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Author Topic: What Instructors Carry for Defense.  (Read 6484 times)

MTK20

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What Instructors Carry for Defense.
« on: November 14, 2017, 09:42:38 pm »


I greatly enjoy active self protection, but I feel that this is expressing more of a popularity contest than what is actually "better" or "best".

Everyone focuses on equipment for some reason and not the application of it. If it is double stack and reliable, it really doesn't matter if it is striker or DA/SA. Even those old timers that carry wheel guns or 1911's aren't quite as clueless as the polymer kids would like to make them out to be.
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Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 11:16:44 pm »
    Maybe he should have waited until he wasn't tired.   :coffee
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    Mikee5star

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 12:53:34 am »
    I don't know about his conclusions.  I know lots of people like Glocks, and the Glock system.  I find them to be the Bud Lite of the gun world.  They work and work well, but are kind of blah.  Forgettable is the adjective that comes to mind.  Also they are very much the available, low cost leader.  Followed closely by the M&P line in both categories. So ideal for an instructor to carry, as many newbies buy one or the other as a first handgun/carry gun.  I found it telling that 90% out of 46 persons the carry guns were Glocks, and yet only three of those were completely stock.  I know that Glocks are easily modified, all mine are/were modified/upgraded, but... 
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    Chief45

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 03:36:37 pm »
    The firearms I carried as an instructor had minimal or no modifications.  Maybe sights and that was about all.  At the point that any student could pick up one of my pistols and not be able to tell any difference between mine and theirs.  I could also pick up any student gun and baring mechanical issues, make their gun do what I needed it do to.    Saved on arguments.   "It's NOT the gun.  Now listen to what I'm telling you", was valid more than 98% of the time.

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    Plebian

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 04:18:16 pm »
    I think the Glock/M&P in 9mm addresses the problem of self defense in an effective way. There will be few people to argue that it is NOT an effective and good defensive sidearm. I would even go so far as to say it would be quite difficult to argue any other sidearm is 'better' for defensive use.

    The striker-fired 9mm is the arming sword of modern day. It is neither exciting, specialized or notable. It is functional and good.

    If you have specialized needs, style or experience. Then the general purpose defensive handgun is likely not in your interest.

    Whatever your choice, anyone worth listening to and taking advice from will tell you to master it. It is almost always the application that makes real tactical differences. The equipment is just a tool to enhance that application. 
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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 04:35:36 pm »
    First rule of a gunfight is to have a gun.  Rule #1a, is to have a gun that you can run well.  Doesn't matter how cool, tactical, or high-speed/low-drag it is, if you can't run it pretty well, you have missed the point, and are liable to get your silly a$$ in a world of trouble!
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    GeorgeHill

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 04:39:46 pm »
    The only thing that matters is that it Goes Bang when you need it to, and the Bang makes a Hole where you want the Hole to be.
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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 05:53:40 pm »
    The only thing that matters is that it Goes Bang when you need it to, and the Bang makes a Hole where you want the Hole to be.

    I am SO stealing that!!!!
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    ZeroTA

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #8 on: November 17, 2017, 12:20:06 am »
    I found it telling that 90% out of 46 persons the carry guns were Glocks, and yet only three of those were completely stock.  I know that Glocks are easily modified, all mine are/were modified/upgraded, but...

    What’s “modified”? Anything’s better than OEM sights.

    I’ve been known to not leave well enough alone. Changing parts is usually ok. When you start to muck about with “competition springs” and whatnot that’s when you see issues. Factory Glocks and other polymer weapons run just fine. Modified weapons with factory spring weights run just fine.  Start messing with the springs and you’re the guy asking why your weapon doesn’t run. Looks superfly on Instagram though.


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    I'm not saying you should use an M1A for home defense, but I'm also not saying you shouldn't.

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #9 on: November 17, 2017, 09:53:40 am »
    When I first saw this I thought "Not me, my Glocks are bone stock".

    Then I remembered my Glock 29 has TruGlo sights and a +2 baseplate on both mags.

    I guess it isn't so stock after all.

    But my Glock 20 and 19 are both stock.
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    Mikee5star

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #10 on: November 17, 2017, 10:39:49 am »
    My G17 has had some of the springs replaced, otherwise it is completely stock.  Other than it, I have changed sites, barrels, and recoil springs on all my Glocks. Not to mention messing around with mags.
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    Kaso

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #11 on: November 17, 2017, 03:33:04 pm »
    I think the Glock/M&P in 9mm addresses the problem of self defense in an effective way. There will be few people to argue that it is NOT an effective and good defensive sidearm. I would even go so far as to say it would be quite difficult to argue any other sidearm is 'better' for defensive use.

    The striker-fired 9mm is the arming sword of modern day. It is neither exciting, specialized or notable. It is functional and good.

    If you have specialized needs, style or experience. Then the general purpose defensive handgun is likely not in your interest.

    Whatever your choice, anyone worth listening to and taking advice from will tell you to master it. It is almost always the application that makes real tactical differences. The equipment is just a tool to enhance that application. 
    I think this whole post, and specifically the analogy, is the best analysis yet.  The Glock and similar are some of the best, if not the best choices to issue to a person with minimal training.  Not perfect for any application, yet good enough for damn near all of them, and the amount of training required to achieve 'good enough' is less than most anything else. 

    As a personal example, I bought my first Glock after having owned handguns for seven years.  I was not 'skilled' with them, and neither did I pretend to be.  I knew more or less what I was capable of, and it wasn't anything special.  The first time out firing a Glock - the first shots - I was consistently hitting steel at 50yds.  I had lots of trigger time behind pistols, but none on a Glock.  They are just that easy to pick up.  :shrug

    Kaso

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    Re: What Instructors Carry for Defense.
    « Reply #12 on: November 17, 2017, 03:40:47 pm »
    What’s “modified”? Anything’s better than OEM sights.

    I’ve been known to not leave well enough alone. Changing parts is usually ok. When you start to muck about with “competition springs” and whatnot that’s when you see issues.
    I would consider a weapon to still be 'stock,' if it has had the springs replaced with new ones of the same weight.  OEM or aftermarket doesn't matter, but the same weight is key.  That is still 'stock' in spirit.  I also consider a gun to still be stock, if the sights are changed out.  They are replaceable for a reason, and have no functional impact on the gun.  Anything else, and your gun is 'modded.'

    My personal Glock has a customized setup of Meprolight night sights, a 'mid length' Vickers mag release, and the NY1 trigger spring/3.5 disconnector.

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