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Author Topic: Training kids for situational awareness.  (Read 5705 times)

coelacanth

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Training kids for situational awareness.
« on: June 18, 2018, 05:51:28 pm »
This came up over at Arizona Gun Owners www.arizonagunowners.com and I thought it was a good enough topic to introduce it over here.  The original post in that thread asked if anyone knew if there were any classes or or professional training available to help get kids to think seriously about the subject.  The OP wondered about kids from age 8 to 15 specifically but I think it would work from "Stranger Danger" for little ones all the way to high school graduates.   :shrug

So far nobody seems to be able to track down any professional training or even classes available for this kind of thing but it definitely seems to dovetail with the desire to make our children safer in all environments.  There's a lot of "tactical" stuff from books to videos to seminars and focused training for adults but I'm coming up empty for anything like it for children.   :shrug

What say you?

Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    MTK20

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    Re: Training kids for situational awareness.
    « Reply #1 on: June 18, 2018, 09:34:27 pm »
    I've thought at length about this and this is how I plan on implementing it when my nephew gets a little older. You make it a memorisation game, like the curious George matching game or any other children's game. You tell them the rules that it begins and ends with doorways (entrances and exits).

    Before you enter a store, house, etc you tell them "ready?" And then you can't talk about it until you exit the building. After all, getting help would be cheating. Once exiting ask them what they saw.

    Here are the goals:

    How many people did you count inside?

    How many were boys and how many girls?

    What were some of them wearing?

    Did you see any neat or funny tattoos? What did those look like?

    If uncle MTK is 5' 10" about how tall were some of the other people you would guess?

    That's the start of my game. You start with baby steps of just counting the people, then you can make it as simple or complex as you want (such as what were they doing, guess what's in their pockets, etc).

    Hope this helps!
    Texas
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    Plebian

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    Re: Training kids for situational awareness.
    « Reply #2 on: June 19, 2018, 09:15:01 am »
    Also have kids notice what shoes people are wearing, and what stances people are taking.

    I can just say from bouncing. That almost no one swings on you without switching to an offensive stance first, and they almost always ball their fists up before they swing as well.

    Shoes tell you what the person planned on doing that day. It would be rare for the fellow in sandals to be headed to the construction site.
    Oklahoma"If all our problems are solved, we'll find new ones to replace them. If we can't find new ones, we'll make new ones."

    Chief45

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    Re: Training kids for situational awareness.
    « Reply #3 on: June 19, 2018, 10:06:10 am »
    went through this with Dad, uncles, cousins, etc.   Daily.
    From my own experience,  daily and weekly, is the only way to teach it. In the fields, in stores, shopping trips, hunting trips, in the yard, in the garage, driving down the road, etc.   One of the best I found was to assign a object to be found.   
    "Bud, we need a new XXXXX.    go find them, compare what they have, then come find me and report".
    going to a "class" or "seminar" is a waste of your money and time and the kids 99%+ "won't catch on".   the less than 1% that would,  have already been trained and "gotten it".
    People in general, and kids are just shorter people, don't look at anything outside of their own special point of view.  Same way with "active listening". 
    you look, but you don't see.   you hear, but you don't listen. 

    Takes a lot of effort, patience and time to train someone in those skills.  there are no instant fixes here because it involves changing viewpoints, outlook and how information is received and processed.



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    coelacanth

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    Re: Training kids for situational awareness.
    « Reply #4 on: June 19, 2018, 06:33:22 pm »
    Good stuff guys.  There's also a few really good replies over at the original thread over at Arizona Gun Owners if you want to check them out. 

    I think Chief45's point about classes and seminars for kids is well taken.  Which may explain the apparent lack of anything like that being available.   :hmm

    Also a good point about shoes and stance.   :thumbup1   I admit to getting a little curious about somebody if I can't see both of their hands - especially in a public setting.
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

                                                   Benjamin Franklin

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