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Author Topic: The Fine Gun family portrait  (Read 6678 times)

MichaelZWilliamson

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The Fine Gun family portrait
« on: November 02, 2019, 09:44:08 pm »
The Fine Gun family pic, all together.

From the top:

Cape Gun, 20 bore, German, about 1800, converted from flint to percussion. Straight polygonal left, rifled right.

Mortimer 12 gauge damascus percussion, Edinburgh, about 1850.

W&C Scott & Sons Special Grade 10 gauge twist, London, 1873.  Has the patented spindle latch now standard on most shotguns.

Henri Pieper Diana, 10 gauge twist, Liege, 1883. Has the patent for the monoblock breech.

Williams and Powell 12 gauge, Liverpool, about 1880, Anson and Deeley boxlock, patent use number 2952.  Rebarreled by Stubbs of London, 1955ish.

Westley Richards damascus 12 gauge, Birmingham, about 1876. Completely refinished.  Anson and Deeley patent use number 1518.

Haenel Gew 88 safari sporter, 8mm Mauser, double set triggers, Suhl, 1909.

Robert Faller drilling, 16 gauge over 8X58R Sauer, Freiberg, 1912-1915.

Luciano Rota sidelock, 12 gauge, Italy, imported by Badol Arms, about 1965.

http://www.MichaelZWilliamson.com
Recent novels:
A Long Time Until Now (paperback edition), July 2016 from Baen Books
Angeleyes, Nov 2016 from Baen Books

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    wyatt

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #1 on: November 02, 2019, 11:36:50 pm »
    That's quite a collection! Imagine the stories they could tell, if only they could talk.

    MichaelZWilliamson

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #2 on: November 03, 2019, 12:30:11 am »
    The cape gun has at least 7 stock repairs, and after the conversion to percussion had a hammer replaced. The cheek rest was an addition. It was no safe queen.
    http://www.MichaelZWilliamson.com
    Recent novels:
    A Long Time Until Now (paperback edition), July 2016 from Baen Books
    Angeleyes, Nov 2016 from Baen Books

    wyatt

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #3 on: November 03, 2019, 01:06:35 am »
    The cape gun has at least 7 stock repairs, and after the conversion to percussion had a hammer replaced. The cheek rest was an addition. It was no safe queen.

    I'd imagine it was passed from father to son for many generations. It must have been used to take much game, defend against enemies and keep the tax collector at bay.

    MichaelZWilliamson

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #4 on: November 03, 2019, 01:44:07 am »
    Probably a lot of hunting in the Black Forest. Likely in regular use from 1800ish to 1870, and then kept as backup.
    http://www.MichaelZWilliamson.com
    Recent novels:
    A Long Time Until Now (paperback edition), July 2016 from Baen Books
    Angeleyes, Nov 2016 from Baen Books

    coelacanth

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #5 on: November 03, 2019, 02:22:20 am »
    A beautiful collection.  Thanks for sharing it with us.   :thumbup1
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    HMPlatinum

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #6 on: November 09, 2019, 10:31:29 am »
    Very nice.  The combined history...
    Missouri"You can only fight the way you practice"  - Miyamoto Musashi

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    RMc

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #7 on: November 09, 2019, 02:21:35 pm »
    Of historical interest, which of your 19th century breechloading shotguns are choke bored in one or both barrels?

     
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    MichaelZWilliamson

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #8 on: November 09, 2019, 07:05:33 pm »
    The Pieper (1883) and Richards (1876) are choked. The WC SCott is not, but is probably around 1873, possibly as late as 1878. The Williams and Powell was rebarreled sometime between 1954 and 1968.

    The drilling is 1912-1915 and choked.

    Chokes became common in the late 1870s, and one of the ways to date British guns is the proofmark NOT FOR BALL--1875-1877.  After that it changed to "Choke."
    http://www.MichaelZWilliamson.com
    Recent novels:
    A Long Time Until Now (paperback edition), July 2016 from Baen Books
    Angeleyes, Nov 2016 from Baen Books

    RMc

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #9 on: November 09, 2019, 08:32:11 pm »
    The Pieper (1883) and Richards (1876) are choked. The WC SCott is not, but is probably around 1873, possibly as late as 1878. The Williams and Powell was rebarreled sometime between 1954 and 1968.

    The drilling is 1912-1915 and choked.

    Chokes became common in the late 1870s, and one of the ways to date British guns is the proofmark NOT FOR BALL--1875-1877.  After that it changed to "Choke."

    That your (1876) Richards has choke boring is quite interesting.
    As I understand, W.W. Greener was the first to develop a  repeatable method of choke boring around 1874.  Apparently Greener's system, or variants thereof. spread very quickly - particularly among English makers.



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    MichaelZWilliamson

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    Re: The Fine Gun family portrait
    « Reply #10 on: November 09, 2019, 08:47:26 pm »
    I'm awaiting a letter from Westley Richards to confirm the date, but the patent use number for the Anson and Deeley boxlock is low 4 digits, as in the first digit is "1."
    http://www.MichaelZWilliamson.com
    Recent novels:
    A Long Time Until Now (paperback edition), July 2016 from Baen Books
    Angeleyes, Nov 2016 from Baen Books

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