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Author Topic: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...  (Read 11436 times)

Mikee5star

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Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
« Reply #25 on: October 30, 2019, 11:56:16 pm »
Talk about mushy triggers, I have a a new Sig P365 and it has the worst damn trigger I’ve ever had. I don’t know why people gush over it. I’ve never experienced so much creep ever. I know mine is an example of one but damn. 

Really?  Send it back to SIG.  Something is out of spec.  Mine is almost 1911 crisp and that is something of a selling point for SIG. 
Alaska

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    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #26 on: October 31, 2019, 01:33:23 am »
    That would be nice.  I think some CNC machines can do some of that stuff, but they are expensive and require stuff like 3 phase power hookups.
    The the industrial CNC set up are spendy.
    I'm thinking something the size of a medium chest freezer, costing around $4000, where you stick in an SD card with the files for the item you want and press the button, able to work on steel as well as Aluminum. Either 110 or 220 volts.     Doesn't have to be fast, it would be a hobbyist set up. 
    Heck, with a library of files it would be useful for machining non-firearm parts.

    Closest I've seen to this is a Grizzly Mill with an aftermarket CNC kit.


    coelacanth

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    Arizona" I won't insult your intelligence by suggesting you really believe what you just said."

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    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #28 on: October 31, 2019, 01:12:15 pm »
    https://www.sherline.com
    Thank you VERY much, kind sir.
    That is precisely the sort of thing I was thinking about. 

    Bookmarked pending funds.


    coelacanth

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #29 on: October 31, 2019, 01:14:11 pm »
    Amazing what you find just kicking around the interwebs.    :whistle    Glad to be of assistance.   :cool
    Arizona" I won't insult your intelligence by suggesting you really believe what you just said."

                                   William F. Buckley, Jr.

    ksuguy

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #30 on: October 31, 2019, 02:50:24 pm »
    Interesting.  I will have to look for some YouTube videos on it.   Having the ability to take a hunk of metal, push a button, and then have it spit out a pistol frame, AR lower, etc. In a day or so would be great.   It would be useful for other small parts too.   

    I thought about looking for some used CNC stuff around here since there is a ton of it available with the aircraft industry here in town, but it's really too much for the average home user.   This might provide something to fill that niche.
    Kansas

    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #31 on: October 31, 2019, 03:28:18 pm »
    Precisely my thoughts.
    When I was looking around their site I noticed they have CNC lathes as well, sold separately to in a package deal with the CNC mill. With both I think a person would be able to make their own barrels as well if needed. Obviously not going to be match grade, or chrome lined, but it would still be cool to be able to do it all "in house".

    As for the "other small parts" I'm thinking that might be a lovely ability for people who collect old machinery, or for people for whom a drive to the store is 4 or more hours round trip.

    Interesting.  I will have to look for some YouTube videos on it.   Having the ability to take a hunk of metal, push a button, and then have it spit out a pistol frame, AR lower, etc. In a day or so would be great.   It would be useful for other small parts too.   

    I thought about looking for some used CNC stuff around here since there is a ton of it available with the aircraft industry here in town, but it's really too much for the average home user.   This might provide something to fill that niche.

    ksuguy

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #32 on: October 31, 2019, 05:18:14 pm »
    I'm thinking more like fire control groups.  For example DSA is always out of stock on various small FAL parts.   

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    kunkmiester

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #33 on: October 31, 2019, 08:41:12 pm »
    Sherline lathes are too small to bore barrels easily.

    You can only go so far on those blocks until you have to flip it for a second operation.  Then you have to deal with fixturing that's different for every part you make, even if it's just soft vise jaws.

    Machining will always be a fairly specialized skill.  What you want is 3d printing in metal to get down to the consumer range.
    WashingtonEvil is Evil, no matter how small

    RMc

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #34 on: October 31, 2019, 08:53:14 pm »
    Alabama

    MTK20

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    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

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    coelacanth

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #36 on: October 31, 2019, 09:49:48 pm »
    My neighbor owned one of those back in the day.   He was torn between doing a pintle mount in the back end of the Dodge or installing it in the previously decorative cupola on top of the house.  I think the idea was to be able to repel boarders while wearing the "IF IT AIN"T BELT FED IT AIN"T SH*T",  t-shirt and sipping adult beverages.  :whistle   He also had a sizeable stock of belted ammo for it.  He passed away a couple of years back and rumor has it his widow lost it in a boating accident on the way to a family reunion.   :cool
    Arizona" I won't insult your intelligence by suggesting you really believe what you just said."

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    sqlbullet

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #37 on: November 01, 2019, 10:05:35 am »
    3-phase isn't that bad as long as you don't need to drive over a 5 HP motor.  VFD's are great!
    Utah

    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #38 on: November 01, 2019, 10:31:55 am »
    Huh.
    I'd figured they should at least be able to do pistol barrels.
    Sherline lathes are too small to bore barrels easily.

    You can only go so far on those blocks until you have to flip it for a second operation.  Then you have to deal with fixturing that's different for every part you make, even if it's just soft vise jaws.

    Machining will always be a fairly specialized skill.  What you want is 3d printing in metal to get down to the consumer range.

    kunkmiester

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #39 on: November 01, 2019, 10:00:45 pm »
    You have a half inch spindle bore, and need to get a drill/reamer/bar through the whole thing, so you need enough space to hold the barrel and the tool.

    The work can't hang out too far, I suppose you could get six inches out of it.  The website says you have 17" between centers, loose a few inches for the slide, split in half and give yourself some clearance, and six is the max, assuming the hang out doesn't kill you.
    WashingtonEvil is Evil, no matter how small

    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #40 on: November 01, 2019, 10:20:38 pm »
    Ok, and thank you.
    What would be the smallest set up you would advice for making pistol and perhaps rifle barrels.
     
    You have a half inch spindle bore, and need to get a drill/reamer/bar through the whole thing, so you need enough space to hold the barrel and the tool.

    The work can't hang out too far, I suppose you could get six inches out of it.  The website says you have 17" between centers, loose a few inches for the slide, split in half and give yourself some clearance, and six is the max, assuming the hang out doesn't kill you.

    kunkmiester

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #41 on: November 01, 2019, 11:08:40 pm »
    A three or four inch barrel might come off one easily enough.

    Look at keeping hangout less than three times the length, and you need the tool past the tool post/turret the full depth you're running it, probably the full length if you're making the bore all at once (best way to avoid issues).

    Sherline could work for a four inch barrel, if it can hold tolerance, for rifles you need at least 20 inches of travel probably.  A bigger lathe though will have a bigger spindle bore so you can seat the part deeper, and some will have a second chuck on the back to support the back end.

    You need what, an inch at least for a barrel?  Most lathes will have that or more.  For a 20" barrel you probably need a 30" between centers lathe.  I think they standardize about that size anyway, you'd end up with 24" or 32" or something like that.  Might end up with a 40" too.

    Keep in mind a lathe won't do rifling.
    WashingtonEvil is Evil, no matter how small

    coelacanth

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #42 on: November 03, 2019, 12:51:28 am »
    True, but you could do a nice little smooth bore .  .  .   :cool
    Arizona" I won't insult your intelligence by suggesting you really believe what you just said."

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    LowKey

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    Re: When will the firearms industry get off its laurels and...
    « Reply #43 on: November 03, 2019, 07:44:59 pm »
    True, but you could do a nice little smooth bore .  .  .   :cool
    I think you could do a serviceable job of rifling a barrel with a button and hydraulic press.
    Not anywhere near match grade, but for a pistol target within 50-100 yards?

    I think Mark Serbu posted a video on this a few years back.

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