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Author Topic: New (old) rifle  (Read 2464 times)

mattitude

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New (old) rifle
« on: August 20, 2016, 11:48:43 am »
I recently picked up another old gun in a trade to go along with my FG42, a mid-1944 dated duv coded G43 rifle.  I've owned at least a half dozen of them over the past 15 years but for one reason or another I ended up selling them, and I regretted every sale.  I used to have a decent sized German WW2 collection but was priced out of the hobby a number of years ago and didn't want to deal with the mountain of fakes that goes along with the hobby. 

I've been trying to pick up another G/K43 for quite some time but was either way too poor to buy a rifle that was way over priced or had every trade fall through or not even considered.  Even original parts have gotten out of control so building up a rifle from parts is cost prohibitive.  I was lucky enough to come across a fellow trying to sell his mismatched G43 but surprisingly no takers despite asking a lot less than what the average shooter is going for.  I made a trade offer that he accepted and 5 days later I finally had a G43 in my possession. 

Overall the condition is typical...metal in good shape, stock has been sanded w/stampings barely visible, mismatched parts (duv barreled receiver w/Walther complete bolt group), common coded magazine & somewhat decent bore.  I've been smart enough to have kept my restricted gas piston so that I can safely shoot the rifle.  Every G/K43 is over-gassed to the point that the rifles will self-destruct eventually, some sooner than later, and will damage/break expensive parts along the way.  This rifle does have some small cracks on the back of the action cover that will need to be welded/filed/finished/blued and luckily that is the only damage to the whole rifle. 

I did get to put 20 rounds through it yesterday morning along with the FG42 and in typical fashion it mangles brass like nobody's business.  I don't have that much 8x57 brass and unfortunately what I do have will end up getting destroyed and I'm not exactly happy about that.  At one time 8mm was the cheapest surplus ammo but that is far from the case today.  I'll have to put some more rounds through it and see what kind of accuracy I can get and if it's good enough it might even go into my Vintage Military rifle rotation.

 
North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

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    Kaso

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #1 on: August 20, 2016, 12:56:02 pm »
    If it mangles brass, is steel- cased an option?

    GeorgeHill

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #2 on: August 20, 2016, 02:56:55 pm »
    That's freaking cool.
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    mattitude

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #3 on: August 20, 2016, 03:32:24 pm »
    Unfortunately steel cased ammo is still pretty expensive. It's slightly cheaper for me to buy the brass and load it myself and end up with a more consistent round.  What I'm doing right now is I've formed some 30-06 brass and they are in my case cleaner as I speak. If it trims down and has good neck tension then I'll load up 5 or 10 rounds and see how it does.

    If it mangles brass, is steel- cased an option?
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    coelacanth

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #4 on: August 20, 2016, 04:40:38 pm »
    Nice.   :thumbup1
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    Kaso

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #5 on: August 20, 2016, 05:03:21 pm »
    Unfortunately steel cased ammo is still pretty expensive. It's slightly cheaper for me to buy the brass and load it myself and end up with a more consistent round.  What I'm doing right now is I've formed some 30-06 brass and they are in my case cleaner as I speak. If it trims down and has good neck tension then I'll load up 5 or 10 rounds and see how it does.
    Well if it is still cheaper to buy new brass and handload, I guess that is a no brainer.  I always figured it was only cheaper to hand load if you recycled brass, and if the rifle was only going to chew up brass anyway... Steel-cased.

    I am seriously considering an 8mm rifle.  I am not into hand loading yet, but what is your cost per round?

    mattitude

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #6 on: August 20, 2016, 05:48:41 pm »
    If I can get a deal on the brass for around 50-75 cents per piece and last time I looked Midway had a sale on projectiles for 40 cents per and primers have come down a bit to around 3 cents per piece. I estimate around 200 rounds per pound of powder at about 30 dollars per pound so if my math is correct that's 15 cents per powder throw. So I'm looking at 1.08-1.33 per round, not exactly cheap and the fact that I'm losing the brass doesn't make me feel any better. I do have some steel cased Romanian stuff but it's corrosive and not what I would call that accurate and at 15.00 for 20 rounds it's not cheap blasting ammo. I love to shoot in vintage military matches so I'll spend a little more if it makes me more competitive...but I still hate losing the brass.

    Well if it is still cheaper to buy new brass and handload, I guess that is a no brainer.  I always figured it was only cheaper to hand load if you recycled brass, and if the rifle was only going to chew up brass anyway... Steel-cased.

    I am seriously considering an 8mm rifle.  I am not into hand loading yet, but what is your cost per round?
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    JesseL

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #7 on: August 20, 2016, 11:05:35 pm »
    I've got so much .30-06 brass around, I'd probably spend the $35 to get a forming die to convert that stuff to 8x57.
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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #8 on: August 21, 2016, 12:11:05 am »
    All you need is a full length sizing die and then trim to length. The case head & extractor groove is exactly the same size and the -06 case Web is .001" larger. A cutting jig would save a lot of time from the case trimmer. I'm using some Greek -06 surplus and seeing how it does.  I also ordered some projectiles from midway for 16 cents per and some more brass for 36 cents per and I have a few thousand primers that I bought 10 years ago for 16.95/thousand so my price per round is about half of what I calculated above.

    I've got so much .30-06 brass around, I'd probably spend the $35 to get a forming die to convert that stuff to 8x57.
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    mattitude

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #9 on: August 21, 2016, 12:13:46 am »
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #10 on: August 22, 2016, 04:42:44 pm »
    Sweet.
    And it's a shooter not some wallhanger you would be afraid to use for fear of ruining it's value.
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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #11 on: August 22, 2016, 04:57:03 pm »
    I have some Turkish 8mm that I haven't been using if you would be interested.  It is corrosive though.
    Kansas

    mattitude

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #12 on: August 22, 2016, 08:37:03 pm »
    Thanks but that stuff is death incarnate in semi autos and I avoid it anyway on general principle.

    I have some Turkish 8mm that I haven't been using if you would be interested.  It is corrosive though.
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    ksuguy

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    Re: New (old) rifle
    « Reply #13 on: August 22, 2016, 10:57:57 pm »
    No problem,  I kind of figured you might pass.   I've only used a little of it in my old Turkish Mauser.  Cleaned it pretty good, but found it started to rust a few days later and had to reclean it a second time.   I wouldn't want to try cleaning it out of the gas system on a semi either.  Especially one of your expensive ones.  It's one thing if the Mauser I paid $60 for gets some rust,  much worse for a K43. 

    Haven't had much chance to shoot it since it attracts a magnet.  None of the ranges want to let anyone shoot anything with any steel in it at all, either because they are afraid it is AP and will damage the backstop at the indoor range,  or the outdoor places are worried about it causing sparks and setting something on fire.   
    Kansas

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