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Author Topic: M14 - M1A Rifles  (Read 131808 times)

coelacanth

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Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
« Reply #300 on: November 23, 2018, 07:41:56 pm »
 :thumbup1  Good luck.  I hope it performs well for you. 
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    MTK20

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    Mikee5star

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #303 on: May 26, 2019, 09:06:13 pm »
    I watched a Q&A on C&Rsenal from a couple of years ago and they were asked what "modern" rifle they would take back to WWI.  The answer was what rifle would I take back that could be put in production with that tech level, the M14.  IMHO that says a lot about the basic design that it could be made with 19teen tech.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #304 on: May 26, 2019, 10:42:08 pm »
    It would be hard to beat the old M3 "Grease gun" as a trench weapon.   :hmm   I would think ammo would be hard to come by for the M14 but the M1 Garand would work without any supply chain disruption.   :coffee
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    Kaso

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #305 on: May 27, 2019, 12:35:57 am »
    I imagine the M-14 could easily be re-engineered to be chambered in .30-06.  Though I do like the M3 idea.  It would have made the trench fighting very one-sided.

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #306 on: May 27, 2019, 12:40:02 am »
    To the article, I don't know if I can agree that it is 'the worst,' though I think most of us would agree that the politics and decision making process that resulted in both it and the 7.62 round, were among the low points in our acquisition processes throughout history..

    Langenator

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #307 on: May 27, 2019, 08:40:30 am »
    I think subsequent history (i.e., the fact that tons of countries adopted the FAL and the G-3, and nobody but the U.S. adopted the M-14 unless they were given them free) showed that the M-14 was probably not the best military battle rifle available.

    Is the M-14 capable of dominating the competition on the firing line at the National Matches? Yes. (At least until the M-16A2 and 77 grain SMKs came along.)

    Is the FAL a better rifle for actual combat in African jungles, Middle Eastern deserts, and European mud? Also yes.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #308 on: May 27, 2019, 02:14:45 pm »
    Perhaps.  Still, there was no real push to arm American forces with either the FAL or the G3 or even the AR10 which would have had a common manual of arms with the  M16 .    :hmm   The fact that the M 14 in one guise or another is still in service with the American armed forces is testament enough to its standing as a battlefield weapon.  Today its a specialist's weapon and in that role its still pretty good IMO. 

    Not perfect but no battle rifle is.  They are all a bundle of compromises and contradictions designed to pass a certain test at an acceptable price point.  When we decide to arm our folks with the best possible battlefield weapons regardless of cost instead of letting bureaucrats and bean counters decide the issue among the lowest bidders we will begin to see a dramatic improvement in capability.
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    Langenator

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #309 on: May 28, 2019, 08:13:27 am »
    The biggest reason the old M-14s were pulled out of cold storage was because we needed something with better long range performance than the M-16/M-4, and the M-14s were available, without having to go through any kind of new procurement program, and at minimal cost (especially the first ones to be pulled out, which got a scope and hopefully a cheek riser of some sort.  The Sage EBR stock came later). (Without the Hughes Amendment, I wonder if all those M-14s would have been sold through the CMP?)

    The Army and Marines did buy an AR-10 variant - the Knights Armament SR-25, aka Mk 11 Mod 0 aka M110 SASS, as a partial replacement for both the M24 and M40A1 bolt action sniper rifles, as well as to try to fill the SDMR role that the M-14 EBR was doing stopgap duty as.

    The M110 is, as of 2018, being replaced by a slightly more distant AR-10 derivative, the M110A1, which is based on the HK G28, which derives from the HK 417.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #310 on: May 28, 2019, 11:25:51 pm »
    True.  Which was why they were put in storage to begin with.  Yes, they were ( and are ) not the ideal solution but they were available and from what I've heard those troops that got them were pretty pleased with the additional capability. 

    The SR-25 seemed to be a very limited issue item though - unless I am mistaken.   :hmm 

    I follow this stuff distantly - albeit with some interest for how it affects the average combat infantryman.  Thanks for the update.   :thumbup1
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    sqlbullet

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #311 on: May 29, 2019, 05:39:43 pm »
    ...(Without the Hughes Amendment, I wonder if all those M-14s would have been sold through the CMP?)...

    Considering they are still working through M1's I would think not.
    Utah

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    Re: M14 - M1A Rifles
    « Reply #312 on: May 29, 2019, 08:15:08 pm »
    There's no requirement for the CMP to sell the older stuff first.  I remember them selling M-1s (both kinds) concurrently with M1903s. If the DoD declared the M-14 surplus to requirements, and the CMP was allowed to sell them, I'm sure they would have been able to find buyers.

    As it is, how long before the CMP is reduced to selling M-9s, .22 target rifles, air rifles, ammo, and shooting gear?

    Actually, now that the Army has decided to buy new SiG pistols, I wonder how long it might be before CMP has any M-9s?  I'd buy one, just to have it.  (I already have a Beretta 92, but I'd love to have a .mil surplus one with attendant markings.)
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