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Author Topic: interesting reading for gun nerds  (Read 2523 times)

akodo

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interesting reading for gun nerds
« on: November 22, 2009, 09:30:44 pm »
http://www.gunporting.com/index.htm

I stumbled upon this website when looking for information about Remington barrels being gobbed up in the middle and screwing up accuracy.

I enjoyed reading the gunsmithing emails where he talks to the customer about all the extra oddball problems he finds or challenges he encounters while attempting to do custom work on some older firearms.  It also illistrates to me why the best gunsmiths are always going to end up keeping your gun for a long time.

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    FMJ

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    Re: interesting reading for gun nerds
    « Reply #1 on: November 22, 2009, 11:08:23 pm »
    Let me understand better...

    Porting is like a muzzle brake already contained inside the barrel?
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    JesseL

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    Re: interesting reading for gun nerds
    « Reply #2 on: November 22, 2009, 11:12:28 pm »
    Let me understand better...

    Porting is like a muzzle brake already contained inside the barrel?

    It's something like turning the end of the barrel into a muzzle brake. Often though it's not so much intended to reduce recoil as to reduce muzzle rise, by only having ports on the top o the barrel.
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    akodo

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    Re: interesting reading for gun nerds
    « Reply #3 on: November 23, 2009, 06:59:29 pm »
    porting is basically putting holes in your barrel, so hot gas jets out that hole.

    a jet of air going one way pushes the other way, so if you have ports on the upper surface, it pushes the gun down.  If you put them at a bit of an angle on the sides, it can pull the gun forward a bit, reducing recoil.

    But...I personally was more interested in some of the stuff like this

    Quote
    We last discussed completely leaving out  the forearm  locking mechanism.  Well there was a reason why Colt engineered one into the system in the first place.  Upon firing  your gun with the newly made locking machanism out it attempted to unlock prematurely  and it destroyed the firing pin/ejector lever, plus broke off a piece of the hammer.  This ejector  lever will need to be remade.  I have engineered an additional spring lever  now which will allow the  newly made forearm locking lever to be put back in  and will ONLY ALLOW THE FOREARM TO UNLOCK WHEN THE TRIGGER IS FULLY FOWARD.    When the trigger is pulled back the forearm is locked in place.   This is far beyond what Colt had designed.   In addition, your Colt is now prevented from slam firing if you chamber a round with the trigger already pulled back.   This is a safety concern which all manufacturers have addressed with a trigger disconnector buit into their firearms since the 1960s.

    it's pretty crazy for a customer to ask that a gunsmith drastically change a gun component, especially on an old classic.  It is pretty ballsey for the smith to try such, and the fact that test-firing the change caused him to blow bits of the gun apart is  :o

    Or how about this one

    Quote
    The wrist of this gun was held together by a tin can plate, screws and black electrical tape.  When we removed the plate the stock disintegrated into 13 separate pieces.  Each piece was glued back in one at a time.  We had numerous cracks showing where the pieces fit together.  Tiny plugs were made from a suitable old stock and glued into place  until the cracks disappeared.  About 120 tiny plugs were made and installed before the job was done.

    or this

    Quote
    This rifle (Marlin Model 1881 45-Gov't) was brought in by one of our local customers for identification.  It had been in his family since about 1916.  His father purchased the rifle at the age of 13 in the year of 1916.  He believes his father lived in the Mena,  Arkansas area at that time and reportedly paid $5.00 and a pocketknife for the rifle. 

    I wish I was alive in the days where a 13 year old could buy himself a rifle with $5 and a pocketknife.

    or this

    Quote
    We have a Sharps Midrange # 1 in our shop now which apparently was shot out and rebored and rerifled to a .577 blackpowder express.  When that was shot out it was used as a 20 ga shotgun. It shipped from the factory on Feb 10, 1877.    We are to reline it back to 40 70 Sharps Bottleneck and antique in current made sights to look like they were on the gun forever also.  This Sharps is unique in that there was just 102 Midrange # 1 rifles manufactured and in my research it is the only one shipped from the factory with double set triggers. We received it from a collector in Ohio who had seen our work.  This Sharps is in really excellent shape otherwise and I value it as is at about $8,000 to $10,000 and our work will increase substantially the value of the gun.  This gun and the one like yours are clearly worthwhile  to make parts for. The original finish and patina is left alone and the replacement part are made to look original as is possible.

    Fast cartridges tend to wear out barrels pretty fast.  It is pretty common for a guy with a 22-250 to burn through a few barrels, but to shoot out the barrel of your 40-70 takes a LOT of shooting, to then have it rechambered t0 577 and wear it out a second time, then convert it to a 20 gauge shotgun, boy, that's a hell of a lot of shooting folks.  I bet whoever owned that gun could hit what he aimed at.

    also, such an attitude says a lot about today's throw-away society

    mnw42

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    Re: interesting reading for gun nerds
    « Reply #4 on: November 30, 2009, 01:40:24 am »
    Beware the man with one gun... he probably know how to use it.

    It is more than likely that that gun had seen more than one owner in its life.
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    kunkmiester

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    Re: interesting reading for gun nerds
    « Reply #5 on: November 30, 2009, 01:44:28 pm »
    I've heard of .22 barrels being honed out by lint sticking to cartridges put in pockets.  There are other things that could accelerate bore wear too, I'm sure.
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