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Author Topic: Want to get into shotshell reloading  (Read 4332 times)

The Freeholder

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Want to get into shotshell reloading
« on: October 21, 2008, 09:03:01 pm »
My son is going to eat me out of house and home--he's taken to shooting clays.  I can't do anything about the targets themselves, but I can start to reload the shells and save myself a few bucks.  We have an ample supply of hulls, but I lack knowledge on shotshell reloading.  I have experience in metallic reloading.  Does anyone have a tutorial (preferably online) that outlines not only the process but what all the necessary equipment is, what each part is for and how it functions?  I've Googled up a couple, but they raise as many questions as they answer.  Manufacturer websites haven't been much help either.

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    BruceRDucer

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    Re: Want to get into shotshell reloading
    « Reply #1 on: October 21, 2008, 09:14:26 pm »


         

    Pat-inCO

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    Re: Want to get into shotshell reloading
    « Reply #2 on: October 22, 2008, 12:40:37 am »
    My favorite is the Poness-Warren single stage. I love their progressive, but it is three to four times too expensive for me.

    The single stage has a single resize die, which you move from position to position and reload the hull while it is in the resize die. Requires several cranks on the handle (DUH!) but does a BEAUTIFUL job. In fact, when I was shooting in a trap league out at work, many many people would ask me how I could afford to shoot brand-new AAs all the time. The further into the season, the more I liked that comment (I shot for eight weeks (reload each week) before you could tell that the hulls had been reloaded.

    I did one thing not called for in the manual. I wiped the hulls with a worn out diaper (after washing it  :o ) each time. I found bad hulls that way and cleaned them up, quite a bit.

    P.S. I'm NOT a fan of the Mec reloaders.
    BN-Life - NRA member.

    BruceRDucer

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    Re: Want to get into shotshell reloading
    « Reply #3 on: October 22, 2008, 04:30:38 pm »

         Hmmm....how many "low-end" or beginner reloaders for shotshells are there?   Maybe I ought to have looked more deeply into it.

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    The Freeholder

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    Re: Want to get into shotshell reloading
    « Reply #4 on: October 22, 2008, 09:40:18 pm »
    I never thought about YouTube.

    So that bar he's pushing back and forth--that's the "charge bar", right?  And they come in different sizes depending on how much powder and shot you want to dispense?

    BruceRDucer

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    Re: Want to get into shotshell reloading
    « Reply #5 on: October 23, 2008, 02:00:44 pm »
       Freeholder,  nope,  that is not the "charge bar".

       I can't speak as to the MEC but only my Lee  LOAD-ALL which is the  entry level model doing one shell at a time.

       Keep  this in mind.  From all I've seen,  all the videos and all the "directions" sheets have terrible graphics and quickly move on without clear explanation.  So,  I'll try to clarify it.

       In the LOAD ALL,  below the  chambers for the propellant (left side) and the shot (right side) is a rectangular BOX.  The Box is the CHARBE BAR.   Inside the red plastic BOX are two slots.   Left slot allows the powder to drop.
    You alternately slide the CHARGE BAR back and forth,  Left to Right, to drop either powder or shot.

        There are BUSHINGS of red plastic which precisely fit into the holes in the CHARGE BAR which allow precise  amounts of powder or shot to drip.   Shot bushings are measured in 7/8 ox,  1 oz,   1 1/8 oz  or  1 1/4 oz  etc.

        Powder bushings start way low such as   .130  to  .180.    I more or less assume that these refer to Thousandths of an inch.  They are like little stubby pipes that drop the powder.

         There's all kinds of stuff about reloading that nobody seems to tell you.  None of which stops it from being fun though.   

             Here's an important tip though, good for any reloading.    The HEAVIER the shot/bullet you want to throw out the end of the barrel,  you are going to get two results: 

       (1)  More recoil  and   (2) Higher Chamber pressures.

        Both need to be kept in mind if you're new. 

       If you put an unknown amount of lead weight  in the shell, and it is heavier than specified, the barrel can blow up from the excess of chamber pressure.  The same goes for using excessive and unknown amounts of powder.

         
          I had my shotgun (12 gauge) before the 30-06 rifle, and was pretty nervous about the rifle recoil,  having had my eye brow cut badly by a scope once in Elk hunting camp.

          But when I actually shoulder fired the 30-06  with 150 grain bullets (deer size)  the recoil compared to the shotgun with almost any load, was totally neglibible.  I can shoot the rifle all dang day without a problem.

         Most reloaders will suggest you do shotshells in about the standard  1 1/8 oz   shot load, before going up to ........1 1/4 oz (Heavy Game) size loads.

        I'm different though.  Life is short, and I'm in a hurry, and I want hunting loads for small game this winter.

      Hope some of this is a general help.

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