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Author Topic: Two Presses  (Read 3334 times)

StevenTing

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Two Presses
« on: January 26, 2014, 07:12:19 pm »
How many of you have two reloading presses?  I have a Dillon 650 that I loaded 45acp and will shortly be loading .308. One nice convenient thing here is that both calibers use large primers.   If I wanted to load 9mm,.40 or .223, I'd have to change out the primer system to handle the small primers.   

This got me to thinking, maybe I should just buy a second press.  One to handle large primer and the other to handle small primer.  Then all I would have to so is change out the tool head and I can start cranking rounds out very quickly. 
Utah

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    xsquidgator

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 07:21:50 pm »
    I have ... four presses.  Started with a Lee turret, didn't like it so much and found a deal so I got a Lee Classic Turret press.  I got a cheap ($20 something at the time) Lee single stage for cast bullet resizing, and once in a great while I'll use it for resizing cases.  Then I finally spent the money for something better and got a Hornady progressive that ever since has carried 99% of my reloading load.  I keep the Lee classic turret as a backup and for odd things like 30 Carbine.  The only thing I use the original (not so hot) Lee turret press for now is to loan out to people who want to learn reloading and give it a try.
    So, I only really have one press that gets almost all the use, but there are others in there too.  In your case, I wouldn't think the cost of another progressive press would be worth the slight gain in convenience in not having to change the primer system.  I have to do the same switcheroo on the Hornady and it's a little bit of a chore, but it isn't worth $500 to me to not have to worry about it.

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 08:49:42 pm »
    I have a Dillon 550 that I bought used for 125.00 at least 10 years ago and I also have a small Lee hand press that I'll use for universal depriming.  As far as priming, I use the RCBS APS priming strips with their hand primer and I'm better able to switch from small to large primers as it only takes me about 30 seconds.  I can't remember the last time that I used a press to prime cases.  You might want to check out a similar system and you might find out that hand priming is quicker than with your current setup.
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    StevenTing

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 09:40:14 pm »
    I have a Dillon 550 that I bought used for 125.00 at least 10 years ago and I also have a small Lee hand press that I'll use for universal depriming.  As far as priming, I use the RCBS APS priming strips with their hand primer and I'm better able to switch from small to large primers as it only takes me about 30 seconds.  I can't remember the last time that I used a press to prime cases.  You might want to check out a similar system and you might find out that hand priming is quicker than with your current setup.

    I don't think hand priming will ever be faster than my Progressive.  If I have all my primer tubes loaded, I can load 600-700 rounds in an hour.  I think it would take me longer than that just to hand prime.

    One reason I'm looking at a second press is that the Primer Quick Change is $81.  A new Press is $566.
    But if I throw in the cost of purchasing a new caliber conversion kit and Tool head and powder measure, I'm looking at the following.

    Primer Quick Change - $80.95
    Caliber Conversion Kit - $77.95
    650 Deluxe Quick-change Kit - $107.95

    That comes out to $266.85 versus $566.  That's a difference of $299.

    I'm just brain storming here.  To buy a second case feeder would be $218.95.  But then I could just as easily move the case feeder between machines.  I guess my biggest thing is that changing out the priming system seems complicated.  I think I need to hit some YouTube videos.
    Utah

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 09:09:58 am »
    Another benefit of a second 650 would be not having to wait for press parts should anything go wrong.  As good a Dillon customer service is,  they are fairly overwhelmed right now.

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #5 on: January 28, 2014, 12:48:15 pm »
    With my hand primer I can prime cases while watching TV or at least be comfortable and not be confined to my bench in the garage.  I can also prime a bunch of cases ahead of time and store them in ammo cans.  I don't have the money for another press so my options are much more limited than yours.

    I don't think hand priming will ever be faster than my Progressive.  If I have all my primer tubes loaded, I can load 600-700 rounds in an hour.  I think it would take me longer than that just to hand prime.
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    only1asterisk

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #6 on: January 28, 2014, 02:34:15 pm »
    With my hand primer I can prime cases while watching TV or at least be comfortable and not be confined to my bench in the garage.  I can also prime a bunch of cases ahead of time and store them in ammo cans.  I don't have the money for another press so my options are much more limited than yours.


    How long does it take to load the primer tubes?  I know that I could never keep up with you hand priming, but if you take the time it takes to convert the priming system on the press and the time it takes to load primer tubes, I can hand prime more than a few cases.  Not just that, I can do it while watching my daughter's piano lesson or talking to my wife or watching cartoons with my son.
    Now, I'm in the process of switching over to small primer .45 brass to speed things up for bulk loads, but runs of less than 500 that need a large primer are easy enough to do by hand. I prime all precision rifle ammo and most hunting ammo by hand as I want to feel the primer seat.

    StevenTing

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #7 on: January 28, 2014, 07:21:16 pm »
    2 minutes to load a tube of 100. 
    Utah

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #8 on: January 28, 2014, 07:42:44 pm »
    I use RCBS APS priming strips and I dump a pack of primers (large or small, the strip loader needs no conversion) onto the loading tray and shake it for a few seconds to flip the primers and then put on the plastic cover.  Next is to slide a 25rd strip into the feeder, shake the primers into the strip and press down the lever. Done.  It takes me less than 1 minute to load 4 strips and I can store them in vacuum sealed bags and the strips are color coded for type & size.  I usually have a few hundred preloaded on strips.  It's just how I do things, but that doesn't mean it works for everyone.
    North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

    THE NORSEMAN

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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #9 on: February 11, 2014, 11:24:45 pm »
    Steve, I thought that over very hard after having my 650 for about 6 months, decided not to.  I just wait to load until I'm ready to load 3-4K rounds of something, set up and go.  I run two presses mounted at all times, the 650 and a rockchucker, but I don't have the room really on my bench, nor can I really justify the expense.  I just take the 20 minutes and change over.

    Though I do try to load multiple calibers with the same primer size back to back to cut down on time.
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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #10 on: February 14, 2014, 09:37:47 am »
    I considered a second progressive press for the same reason as Steven. I have the 650, and I was going to use that for large primer and brass prep. I was going to get a 1050 for small primer, since that's the vast majority of what I load, and it takes care of crimped primer pockets. But in the last year my work time has dramatically increased and range time dramatically decreased. I may have been able to justify it a few years ago when I was shooting about 1k pistol rounds a month and getting into 3-gun in a region where shooting sports were growing.
    Now I'm lucky to shoot 2-300 a month, maybe 6 matches a year, and one or two 3-gun matches. Definitely don't need TWO progressives.
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    Re: Two Presses
    « Reply #11 on: March 02, 2014, 08:41:20 am »
    Two or more presses makes sense to me.
    Now my experience runs to shotgun shell reloading for all for four gauges in yesteryear...
    Both single stage and progressive. I have been known to have eleven presses set up at one time...

    Currently, I only reload .38spl with a borrowed Dillon 300. Still my Mentors, and my good gun buddy today, runs more than one press.

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