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Author Topic: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media  (Read 4869 times)

RMc

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Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
« on: July 03, 2013, 10:36:31 pm »
Excellent information on this site for any handloader - even if you only load Jacketed Bullets.

http://www.lasc.us/FryxellSafeHandlingLead.htm

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    coelacanth

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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #1 on: July 03, 2013, 10:42:01 pm »
    Good article.  I've always been a fan of wet tumbling and seeing what can be done with stainless steel polishing media makes me doubt I will ever go back to corncobs or walnut hulls.   I don't cast my own and I very seldom frequent indoor ranges but even so its good to be aware of the hazards.
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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #2 on: July 04, 2013, 01:32:24 pm »
    I always keep my media slightly damp.  Just use a cheap 99 cent spray bottle filled with water.  A few pulls of the trigger when you start a new batch, and you're good to go.

    I would add a couple footnotes to his ALWAYS WASH YOUR HANDS BEFORE EATING warning as well--

    1.  Keep your hand away from your face as well.  No rubbing your eyes, itching your nose, or fingers in the mouth for any reason until you've washed.
    2.  Wash with COLD soapy water, using a gentle washing motion, not a hard scrub.  Cold water closes your skin's pores, and a gentle motion washes residue off, where scrubbing hard can rub residues in, and warm water opens the pores in your skin.

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    coelacanth

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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #3 on: July 04, 2013, 08:39:19 pm »
    Rubber gloves are cheap and easy to use - take off the residue with the glove and toss it in the trash can.
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    Outbreak

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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #4 on: July 05, 2013, 01:20:14 pm »
    Rubber gloves are cheap and easy to use - take off the residue with the glove and toss it in the trash can.

    I do this when sorting brass and sometimes when reloading.
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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #5 on: July 07, 2013, 01:14:58 pm »
    I've tried the glove route before, and it's just not for me.  My hands get way too sweaty.
    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    Gunnguy

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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #6 on: July 07, 2013, 03:26:35 pm »
    Neoprene gloves.
    Less sweaty that latex.
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    RevDisk

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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #7 on: July 07, 2013, 10:49:59 pm »

    Indoor range ventilation is a huge issue. I generally try to avoid any range without serious ventilation. Once or twice is not dangerous, but it can easily become cumulative.

    Hand washing is another really good point. As is the water for the tumbler. I honestly never thought about ventilation for tumbler material. Bit of water should make it a near non-issue, but I'll have to consider tumbling outside...
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    Re: Safe Handling of Lead and Brass Tumbling Media
    « Reply #8 on: July 12, 2013, 05:18:31 pm »
    That was a really cool article. I personally do not reload, but I have always been curious about the proper procedures of casting bullets. I have only seen my Dad cast once or twice that I can remember, but I have always felt a little uneasy when watching the small lead bars be dropped into the melting pot (?) as he did it the garage (door open) with no more protection then a surgical mask. On the same token though, I have been shooting many times at the range and handled spent brass with no worries of lead contamination.  :whistle
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