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Author Topic: Reloading Manual  (Read 2444 times)

StevenTing

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Reloading Manual
« on: April 02, 2014, 11:20:13 am »
What is the latest and greatest reloading book out there? Figured I should get one. I've only used the online reloading center from Hodgdon but it'd be more handy to have the info in an actual book. What do you guys recommend?
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    Outbreak

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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #1 on: April 02, 2014, 11:40:26 am »
    I use the Speer book for most loads, though they don't list lead bullets. I use the Lyman Cast Bullet book for those.
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    Mikee5star

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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #2 on: April 02, 2014, 09:45:59 pm »
    I use the Speer book for most loads, though they don't list lead bullets. I use the Lyman Cast Bullet book for those.

    Yupper.  Those are my main two manuals.  If I could only have one I would have the Speer.

    I also have Hornaday, Nosler and Lee.  Those are the ones I have with me.  I have at least three more of different editions with my other reloading stuff.  I find that different manufactures have different loads for similar bullets.  I usually cross reference when looking at a new load. 

    I use load data from John Taffin for cast lead 10mm loads.  I am VERY careful using online load data.
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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #3 on: April 21, 2014, 01:29:28 am »
    A Hornady 2 volume set, and a Speer, if you're only going to have 2.

    But - if you shoot cast bullets at all(even if you don't cast your own) I HIGHLY recommend the Lyman cast bullet handbook as an additional reference. It covers just about anything and everything about cast bullets, not just the actual casting itself.
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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #4 on: April 21, 2014, 11:17:52 am »
    But - if you shoot cast bullets at all(even if you don't cast your own) I HIGHLY recommend the Lyman cast bullet handbook as an additional reference. It covers just about anything and everything about cast bullets, not just the actual casting itself.

    I have the Lyman book. I can usually find the weight of bullet I need, but rarely the shape of bullet I have. They only seem to have certain molds. I also have no clue what alloy was used to make my favorite bullets, so that just adds confusion.
    TexasOutbreak

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    only1asterisk

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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #5 on: April 21, 2014, 12:00:34 pm »
    I have the Lyman book. I can usually find the weight of bullet I need, but rarely the shape of bullet I have. They only seem to have certain molds. I also have no clue what alloy was used to make my favorite bullets, so that just adds confusion.

    The Lyman book only list bullets from Lyman molds.  99% commercial cast bullets are done on machines.  These bullets are designed with manufacturing in mind as much as shooting.  You can use the starting loads for LEAD bullets of similar design & weight so long as the seating depth is the same or slightly less for the unknown bullet.  Most commercial bullets are made from a fairly hard alloy which in turn makes for a lighter weight.  Difference in lead alloy harness isn't a so much an issue of safety, but one of accuracy and leading.  The harder the alloy, the more pressure is needed to make it obturate, or seal the bore.

     

    only1asterisk

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    Re: Reloading Manual
    « Reply #6 on: April 21, 2014, 12:10:12 pm »
    What is the latest and greatest reloading book out there? Figured I should get one. I've only used the online reloading center from Hodgdon but it'd be more handy to have the info in an actual book. What do you guys recommend?

    Bullets makers books have loads for their bullets.  Powder makers have loads for their powders with a variety of bullets.  Most people need two or three to be able to crosscheck things.  I have no idea how many I have, but it must be in the dozens.  The Sierra, Accurate Arms, and Lyman manuals get the most work, but Speer, Hornady and Nosler are commonly used.  You cant have enough.  I have several of the Hodgden annuals and I like the idea, but the get handled lots and will fall apart. 

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