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Author Topic: Reforming Brass  (Read 4604 times)

Jake91

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Reforming Brass
« on: May 25, 2012, 09:33:53 am »
So I've finally decided to start reloading, starting with the .222 Mag that my grandfather handed down to me. My question is since the parent case of the .204 Ruger is the .222 Mag, if I take .204 brass and run it through a full length sizing die would that make good .222 brass because finding original .222 brass is freaking hard.

Also anyone in the St. Louis area will to help out someone getting started?

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    only1asterisk

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #1 on: May 25, 2012, 10:33:04 am »
    Forming .222 Mag from .204 Ruger involves setting the shoulder back and altering the shoulder angle.  I'm sure it can be done, but might not worth the trouble vs. buying ready made brass.   

    JesseL

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #2 on: May 25, 2012, 01:01:03 pm »
    It's probably worth a try. At worst you might end up with some .204 brass with crumpled shoulders.

    Remember to lube the inside of the neck and if you find you're crushing them you might try annealing the shoulders.
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    Jim147

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 01:18:07 am »
    Did you try the .204 brass? Wondering if they expanded ok?

    You can make them out of the much more common .223. They come up a hair short but unless your trying to load a very short bullet out to the rifling on a long throated barrel you should be alright.

    You need to taper expand the neck out. You'll have a double shoulder until you fire form them.

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    FMJ

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #4 on: October 21, 2012, 05:17:11 pm »
    So I've been reading about about re-forming.  In my case, I have nearly 160 ish pieces of .270 Win once fired brass and this will sooner or later end up as 8x57 for my Mauser rifle.

    I know that you have to anneal to make the brass more flexible, but at what point does one do that step?

    Specifically these are the steps that I'm aware of for re-forming brass:

    *tumble
    *de-prime/resize
    *trim to size
    *de-burr/chamfer
    *anneal


    I wrote the above in no particular order.  My question is, what is the correct order of those steps?
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    reloader7.62

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #5 on: October 21, 2012, 07:12:03 pm »
    Quote
    I know that you have to anneal to make the brass more flexible, but at what point does one do that step?

    In general it's best to anneal the case after you reform it since your cold working areas of the brass that weren't in some cases previously factory  annealed in the past.  This is especially important when reforming cases like .223 to 7.62 x 25 where you cut the entire shoulder off the case and reform a new shoulder and necks altogether.

    I use a 650 degree Tempilstik http://www.tempil.com/products/tempilstik-original/ you can find them at most any place that sells plumbing and welding supplies,price ranges from $9 to $15 depending on the supplier but they go along way.  I usually mark my cases about 1/4" below the shoulder and when they reach the desired temp the tempstik material liquefies.

    In general it depends on what parent case you have and what your converting it to as to the steps,some conversions are more involved than others but 270 or 30-06  is more commonly use brass  for 8 x 57 conversions.  I would probably convert the 270 brass once fire so as not to resize and then expand the neck any more than necessary.  The steps you posted should be fine for the conversion you want.

    RandySBreth

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    Re: Reforming Brass
    « Reply #6 on: November 11, 2012, 02:02:32 pm »
    My website: http://ozarkoutdoorjournal.blogspot.com/


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