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Author Topic: Importance of testing new loads  (Read 2100 times)

nukehayes

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Importance of testing new loads
« on: February 07, 2014, 12:22:33 pm »
Well, I did it.  I finally finished pulling and re-charging (with the correct powder charge this time) the close to 350 rds of 9mm that I loaded in one sitting blindly going off of published load data.  Whenever you change up your load for whatever reason (I ran out of Unique and switched to Bullseye) make sure you make a small batch and get to the range to try it before loading a huge amount.  Also, plated bullets act more like lead bullets and need to have the powder charge backed off.  I was not making dangerous ka-boom type loads, just ones that would shoot patterns vice groups due to the round tumbling from excessive speed.  Handheld inertial bullet pullers work well, but I don't think they were intended for multi-hour sessions.  As my final note, do not store mixed loads in bulk.  I wound up pulling some loads apart that were my favorite Unique load and had to just put them right back together.  Life lesson learned, please don't be as stupid as I was. :facepalm
Ohio-Geoff the Combat Mechanic
www.bubbleheadgunnut.wordpress.com

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    bignate88

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    Re: Importance of testing new loads
    « Reply #1 on: February 07, 2014, 12:39:57 pm »
    I feel your pain when I first started reloading I had to do that with 200 rounds of 45acp that were just a bit to light to reliably cycle in my 1911
    IllinoisThere’s a story about a turtle and a scorpion. Scorpion is stranded on a river bank. Turtle sees this and asks Scorpion to get on his back and he’ll take him across the river. Scorpion gets on Turtle’s back and they go into the river. When they’re about halfway across, Scorpion stings Turtle. As Turtle is sinking, knowing they’re both going to die, he asks Scorpion "Why did you sting me, we’re both going to die?" and Scorpion says "It’s not my fault; it’s what I am."

    StevenTing

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    Re: Importance of testing new loads
    « Reply #2 on: February 07, 2014, 03:26:14 pm »
    I think this is why many people like to just stick with one powder.  But it's a little more challenging now to find it.
    Utah

    cpaspr

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    Re: Importance of testing new loads
    « Reply #3 on: February 07, 2014, 05:29:35 pm »
    As my final note, do not store mixed loads in bulk.  I wound up pulling some loads apart that were my favorite Unique load and had to just put them right back together.

    All of my boxes of handloads have a label noting the bullet type and weight, powder type and charge weight, COAL and date assembled.  Even if less than a full box, I won't mix two different batches together for space saving, unless the only difference is the bullet shape (LRN vs LSWC, but still same weight). 

    Not saying I was particularly smart about it, more just being anal.  You just noted a reason why it's a good idea.
    Oregon

    nukehayes

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    Re: Importance of testing new loads
    « Reply #4 on: February 07, 2014, 08:39:45 pm »
    All of my boxes of handloads have a label noting the bullet type and weight, powder type and charge weight, COAL and date assembled.  Even if less than a full box, I won't mix two different batches together for space saving, unless the only difference is the bullet shape (LRN vs LSWC, but still same weight). 

    Not saying I was particularly smart about it, more just being anal.  You just noted a reason why it's a good idea.

    And that is what I normally do, but for some reason, I thought it was a great idea to crank out 500 and throw em in a .50cal can.  Never again
    Ohio-Geoff the Combat Mechanic
    www.bubbleheadgunnut.wordpress.com

    Outbreak

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    Re: Importance of testing new loads
    « Reply #5 on: February 09, 2014, 08:59:37 pm »
    I don't even keep components for multiple loads usually. I even try to keep multiple calibers to the same components when possible. I load all my handgun ammo with W231, all my .40 with the same bullet, 9mm with the same bullet, etc. I buy in bulk so I don't run out and have to load something different.

    I load on a Dillon, so high volume. There's a quote from an SR-71 pilot that says "you've never been lost till you've been lost at Mach 3." You've never been lost loading till you've been loading wrong at 600 rounds per hour.
    TexasOutbreak

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