Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.

Author Topic: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?  (Read 4782 times)

StevenTing

  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 4651

  • Offline
.45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
« on: June 11, 2010, 11:58:20 am »
Getting ready to place my order on a new Dillon XL650.  I plan to reload .45ACP and .308 but most of it will be the .45.  My previous press was a Square Deal B in .45ACP so I didn't have to worry about dies and all the other stuff.

What should I get?  I don't normally make it out to the gun stores for this kinda stuff.  Mostly order online.  Should I get the ones from Dillon?  Steel vs. Carbide?
Utah

WeTheArmed.com

  • Advertisement
  • ***

    THE NORSEMAN

    • To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them. - Richard Henry Lee
    • Moderator
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5071

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 12:08:43 pm »
    Carbide from Dillon.  They have a wide radius mouth for progressive use, and the carbide means a quick hit of something like Hornady one-shot on the batch of brass you're processing is plenty of lube.
    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    StevenTing

    • WTA Staff
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 4651

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #2 on: June 11, 2010, 12:22:54 pm »
    Was thinking about getting the case feeder.  Do you have one?  Only an extra $212 for it.
    Utah

    cpaspr

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2266

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #3 on: June 11, 2010, 12:56:09 pm »
    Was thinking about getting the case feeder.  Do you have one?  Only an extra $212 for it.

    A friend of mine has a 650 with the case feeder, bullet feeder, primer alarms, etc.  I kept the primer tubes full and the outfeed bin emptied, and we cranked through 500 .45s in about an hour without even trying hard.  Take out that automatic case feeder, and it probably would have been more like 300 or less.  Manually placing either the shell, or the bullet, or both, really slows the 650 down.  Not that I'm complaining.  2-300 an hour beats my current production times on single-stage presses all to pieces.  But if you can afford it, I'd get the bells and whistles and really make that thing fly.  So long as you can maximize safety at the same time, that is.

    Oh, yeah.  Ditto on the carbides from Dillon.  The same friend borrowed my .380 dies a couple of months ago.  They're RCBS, not Dillon.  He had to wiggle each cartridge in place to get each to go into the die as he was processing, since the dies don't have that wide mouth to assist lining the shells up for progressive press use.

    Though I'm curious about TN's recommendation of one-shot.  Other than .30 carbine, I've never heard of using lubes with any carbide dies.  Not doubting him, as he has way more experience than I with reloading.  Just never heard of it.
    Oregon

    StevenTing

    • WTA Staff
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 4651

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #4 on: June 11, 2010, 01:27:56 pm »
    With my SDB I never used any lube.  Had no problems with it.  I took them straight from the tumbler to the loader.  Too bad I threw away the SDB cause I broke it.  Didn't even think to send it back to Dillon for repair under their warranty.  With that SDB, I was doing about 300-400 an hour and I would break a sweat doing it.
    Utah

    seanp

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 4977
    • Redneck Canadian

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #5 on: June 11, 2010, 03:28:30 pm »
    Definitely carbide.
    "Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave."
    The Road - Cormac McCarthy

    THE NORSEMAN

    • To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them. - Richard Henry Lee
    • Moderator
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5071

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #6 on: June 11, 2010, 10:05:28 pm »
    When loading straight wall pistol calibers using carbide dies I'll lay out 100-300 cases(depending on the physical size of the caliber I'm loading) on the old cookie sheet I have for the purpose, give them a VERY light, VERY short shot of one shot case lube, roll them around on the cookie sheet for 5 seconds or so, then dump them in the case feeder.

    Case feeder, primer alarm, and a half dozen or so extra primer tubes, are, IMO, mandatory for the 650.  Otherwise, the 550 is capable of as much or more production than a 650 anyway.

    With several extra primer tubes filled, and all your other stuff organized and ready, the 650 will run an easy, relaxed, and safe pace of about 600-700 rounds per hour.  That's only averaging a full handle stroke every 4-6 seconds.  Not a hurried pace at all.  But to hit 600-700 per hour safely, you must have all your components laid out and ready.  

    Hornady One Shot lube:

    Only straight wall calibers loaded with carbide dies.  It leaves almost ZERO residue, and lubes just enough that when you punch out a full 8 hour snowy winter day loading session, your joints, and the press will thank you.  Loading that kind of volume, the reduction in friction makes a large difference in wear and tear on both you and your gear.
    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    cpaspr

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2266

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #7 on: June 14, 2010, 05:58:34 pm »
    Thanks Norseman.  That explains your preference a lot.  Not required, but makes a long session more bearable and thus, more enjoyable.

    I have a used 550 I picked up last September, but I haven't used it yet.  Only have it set up for .45 ACP, and I need to lube the bullets my dad gave me (that I made in 1973).  Then set up to mould some more, as he gave me his entire setup with about 20 pounds of lead.
    Oregon

    StevenTing

    • WTA Staff
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 4651

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #8 on: June 14, 2010, 06:17:33 pm »
    $935.65   that's the amount sitting on my screen right now for a new Dillon setup.  Can't seem to put in my CC info.  Can someone lend me their CC number for a bit?  That means I need to load about 4000 .45ACP bullets to break even.  If I was shooting .308, it'd be even less.
    Utah

    eskimo jim

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1210

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #9 on: June 14, 2010, 08:56:27 pm »
    I've been happy with my Dillon 550B.  I've had it for several years.

    Jim
    Obama-nomics:  Trickle up poverty.

    What have you done for Liberty today?

    THE NORSEMAN

    • To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them. - Richard Henry Lee
    • Moderator
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5071

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #10 on: June 15, 2010, 12:22:46 am »
    Steve, just a note on 650 operation.  Don't get me wrong, I love mine, but:

    Even with practice, it's about a 20 minute process to change calibers along with primer sizes, and get it dialed in and going.  IMO, it's not worth changing around just to load 500 rounds or less.  You spend nearly as much time converting as you do loading.  Drives me nuts.

    As a matter of fact, if I intend to load less than 500 rounds, I'll make it an enjoyable afternoon, and do it  one at a time on my rockchucker for nostalgia's sake.
    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    cpaspr

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2266

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #11 on: June 15, 2010, 03:34:02 pm »
    20 minutes? 

    Back when I had the single-stages in the garage it took me longer than that just to get them uncovered, install the dies, load the powder measure, get the scale out, get the components, and then finally be able to load for an hour.  Then it would take another 20-30 minutes to put everything away and re-cover the presses and powder measure to keep the beloved felines from leaving evidence of their existence.

    Not dissing at all Norseman.  Just that from my perspective, 20 minutes to change things around is quite minor.
    Oregon

    Corey

    • Member
    • **
    • Posts: 245

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #12 on: June 15, 2010, 07:09:58 pm »
    Quote
    Not dissing at all Norseman.  Just that from my perspective, 20 minutes to change things around is quite minor.
    Perspective is everything. I have been loading on a 550B for about 20 years.  I mostly load .45 ACP (get the Dillon Carbide dies) and .30-'06.  That caliber change on the 550 is about 10 seconds.  Compared to that the 650 takes forever to change calibers on.  Now if I have to change the shell plate and primer feed so I can load .357 Mag or .30 Carbine then the changeover is about 10 minutes.

    THE NORSEMAN

    • To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them. - Richard Henry Lee
    • Moderator
    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5071

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #13 on: June 15, 2010, 11:02:15 pm »
    Quote
    Back when I had the single-stages in the garage it took me longer than that just to get them uncovered, install the dies, load the powder measure, get the scale out, get the components, and then finally be able to load for an hour.  Then it would take another 20-30 minutes to put everything away and re-cover the presses and powder measure to keep the beloved felines from leaving evidence of their existence.

    Hhhmm...odd.  When loading on my single stage, it seems to me all I have to do is sit down, load and set the powder measure(scale too, but that's mere seconds), then screw in the correct die. Five minutes tops.  By the twenty minute mark, I've completed the equivalent of 30 rounds or so easily.  

    Why you makin' it so complicated cpaspr?  That deal you describe would exasperate me to no end. ;)
    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    cpaspr

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2266

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #14 on: June 17, 2010, 01:45:38 am »
    Hhhmm...odd.  When loading on my single stage, it seems to me all I have to do is sit down, load and set the powder measure(scale too, but that's mere seconds), then screw in the correct die. Five minutes tops.  By the twenty minute mark, I've completed the equivalent of 30 rounds or so easily.  

    Why you makin' it so complicated cpaspr?  That deal you describe would exasperate me to no end. ;)

    It exasperated me as well.  Which is why I didn't reload much for the first 10 years we had this house.  Most of the time, it just wasn't worth the hassle.  Especially when I wasn't shooting much. 

    The cats sleep in the garage.  And uncovered metal reloading equipment, made of rustable material, is spelled P-E-E  T-A-R-G-E-T.  Doesn't matter that they were fixed at six weeks.  Therefore, I had to keep them covered with custom fitted boxes.  Kept the powder measure empty.  Kept other boxes of stuff on top of the press table just as filler to keep them from walking on it and possibly knocking the boxes off.

    But that was then, and this is now.  December of 2008 I cut the table down and rebuilt it to fit in a closet in one of the bedrooms which has been converted to an office.  Now, I simply close the door.  I can go from typing this, to reloading in less than 30 seconds.  Or back the other way.
    Oregon

    RMc

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2230

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #15 on: September 03, 2010, 01:10:43 am »
    Carbide from Dillon.  They have a wide radius mouth for progressive use, and the carbide means a quick hit of something like Hornady one-shot on the batch of brass you're processing is plenty of lube.

    I agree, Dillon dies are the best for use on the progressive press.  I disagree on the case lube. 

    I have loaded many thousands (lost count long ago) of 45 ACP rounds in Dillon carbide dies with NO lube. The relatively thin, short  ACP case simply does not need any sizing lube in carbide dies. This no-lube approach does not work with relatively  long heavy .44 magnum cases.

    On the other hand, I do clean and degrease my loading dies periodically. Since I lube the dies with Slip 2000  after cleaning, so I may be getting some residual case lube effect from this practice.
    Alabama

    SuperNaut

    • Staff Member Emeritus
    • Senior Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 856

    • Offline
    Re: .45ACP Dies - Which ones to get?
    « Reply #16 on: September 03, 2010, 10:03:45 am »
    Use Dillon Carbide dies and Imperial Sizing Wax.  With Carbide .45 dies I've found that once you run a few (3-5) lubed cases through the die, you don't need to lube the rest, the lube on the die is enough.

    I wish that someone had told me that when I first started.
    Hunting is Green, Reloading is Green


    Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.