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Information and Education => Reloading and Handloading => Topic started by: RMc on June 05, 2014, 09:34:44 pm

Title: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: RMc on June 05, 2014, 09:34:44 pm
Quite an interesting reading journey back to the reloading technology of 63 years ago.

The shotshell section gave loading data for Dupont Bulk Smokeless powder in Dram measurment. 
Shotshell data for familiar powders like RED Dot were given in grains. 

All hulls shown were paper and roll crimped. Data included instructions on how to fit the fiber and card wading to the hull/load. No specific hull or primer were recommended, with the exception of avoiding High Base (not the same as high brass), hulls when using Bulk powders.  The use High base hulls were recommended with High Density powders like Red Dot to reduced the wad column stack needed to fit the load to low base hulls.


http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/OM/IdealHandbook38.pdf (http://www.castpics.net/LoadData/OM/IdealHandbook38.pdf)
Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: Nightcrawler on June 06, 2014, 01:44:43 am
So how did they figure muzzle velocity before the chronograph was invented?


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Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: RMc on June 06, 2014, 12:56:02 pm
So how did they figure muzzle velocity before the chronograph was invented?

The earliest reliable method was the ballistic pendulum.  Here is a reasonably short explanation:

http://firearmshistory.blogspot.com/2011/01/testing-firearms-measuring-bullet_14.html (http://firearmshistory.blogspot.com/2011/01/testing-firearms-measuring-bullet_14.html)
Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: RMc on June 06, 2014, 01:50:48 pm
Due to the limitations of early mechanical chronographs, Pre-WWII shotshell velocity was recorded as the average velocity over 40 yards.

In  pre-WWII Winchester catalogs,  "3 dram equivalent" trap load, (#7 1/2 shot), velocity was listed at 850 fps.  With the coming of electronic chronographs, manufacturer advertising circulars began listing the "muzzle" velocity of trap loads at 1200 fps.
Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: JesseL on June 06, 2014, 02:05:48 pm
So how did they figure muzzle velocity before the chronograph was invented?

I've got a chronograph that probably dates to about that time.

(http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m5/J_M_Lambert/Guns/chronograph.jpg)

It used wire screens that each had a single continuous wire looping back and forth through it, so that it could detect when a bullet had cut the wire. The screens had to be set up something like 10 yards apart, and the measurement was read out in binary coded decimal with incandescent lights.
Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: RMc on December 04, 2020, 06:34:24 pm
Update for online PDF of Ideal Handbook #38

http://www.nzha.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/IdealHandbook38.pdf
Title: Re: 1951 Ideal Loading Manual #38
Post by: cpaspr on December 05, 2020, 01:49:57 pm
Thank you for updating the link.

I recently came into possession of my father's copy of that booklet, but it is missing the first few pages.  I've been meaning to look to see if I could find a copy online.  Now I don't need to, and can leave it safely in the envelope he stored it in.