Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.

Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10
31
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by LowKey on November 15, 2020, 09:25:44 pm »


 :cool
32
Gunsmithing and Weapon Repair / Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
« Last post by LowKey on November 15, 2020, 08:37:02 pm »
Very possibly NOT the route you'd wish to take, but I thought I should mention that CMP will do some refurbishment on Krags.
https://thecmp.org/sales-and-service/services-for-krag-rifle-and-carbine/

When my father passed I found a Krag in his gun safe, most likely aquired from one of the widows in the retirement community after thier husband had passed and they wanted to be rid of it (happens often).   
It's lovely, but it's been sporterized and thus no longer has any collectors value AFAIK.   That being the case I plan on eventually sending it off to CMP and getting it put back into original configuration.  Later it will go in a display case with ammo and be taken out and shot once or twice a year for fun.

Side-note:
It may not be particularly highbrow of me, but I've decided that my "collection" (as opposed to shooters) will be firing condition US Issue Service rifles, repros acceptable when necessary.
33
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by coelacanth on November 15, 2020, 06:15:55 pm »
Just go very slow and pay attention to each station per stroke and you shouldn't have an issue at all. It is just easier to mess up a bunch of stuff at once on a progressive reloader over the single stage type.

You can still grab a single stage as well, and if you are like most you will do so. Just to load low volume high precision rounds.
This ^ .  I am still using my old Dillon 450 from way back and it can be operated as a single stage press but I also have a big O frame single stage that is better for some things.  A press set up like the 1050 is built to produce literally hundreds of rounds per hour which means you can screw up at that same rate.  Spend a few days learning all the finer points of its operation and learning how to spot its weak points and your own.  Remember - you may be able to load at a rate of hundreds of rounds per hour but if you have break down your mistakes its going to be one round at a time.   :facepalm

Congrats on the new toy.   :thumbup1   And I approve of the reloading bench art.   :cool
34
Gunsmithing and Weapon Repair / Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
« Last post by coelacanth on November 15, 2020, 06:03:34 pm »
Seems like a fairly straightforward question but there are a lot of details involved in a stock repair - particularly of an older rifle like you describe. 

Where is the damage?  Is it a crack, a split or a fissure?  How extensive is the damage?  Is the existing wood sound or does some of it need to be replaced for an effective repair?  The answers to those questions would indicate " .  .  .  the best method of repair .  .  . " in your case but without them I couldn't, in good conscience, give you any advice on how to proceed.   Could you post pictures of the rifle and detailed pictures of the damaged wood?    :hmm
35
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by LowKey on November 15, 2020, 05:48:38 pm »
Wow, just wow. So jealous.
I’ve been using a 550 for just shy of a decade and can’t justify going to a 650/750 or 1050. So post some pics so I can drool over yours.
Thanks.
I'll get some pics up once I build a bench for it, it doesn't look like much in the box encased in foam. :)

I still need to pick up a number fo things before I start reloading.
Tumbler- Again, I'm going to bite the bullet and start with wet tumbling, probably a Frankfort.  Steel chips instead of pins.
Scales
Calipers

My wife was looking over when I was watching 1050 set up videos and she voiced adding the Ammobot to the Christmas list.   In a moment of rare restraint I asked her not to do so; first off budgetary issues, secondly I suspect I should have at least 10k rounds under my belt before automating.       

On a humorous note I'm going to try and find a print from the old Warner Bros cartoons, where Bugs is hitting explosive shells with a mallet on a factory assembly line and marking the rounds "dud".   Figure it will look perfect on the wall behind the press.
36
Gunsmithing and Weapon Repair / Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
« Last post by ZackspeeZ on November 15, 2020, 04:46:42 pm »
Hi all,
I have an 1898 Krag-Jørgensen with a cracked stock and I’m wondering what the best method of repair would be. Any suggestions would be appreciated

Be well,
Zackspeez
37
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by lesptr on November 15, 2020, 04:20:20 pm »
Just go very slow and pay attention to each station per stroke and you shouldn't have an issue at all. It is just easier to mess up a bunch of stuff at once on a progressive reloader over the single stage type.

You can still grab a single stage as well, and if you are like most you will do so. Just to load low volume high precision rounds.
I was going to say “you can also use a progressive press as a single stage press”. I can with my 550, but don’t know if a 1050 can.
38
Gun.Deals / HQ ISSUE Handgun Carry Case (Black, FDE) - $29.99
« Last post by apps47inc on November 15, 2020, 04:09:50 pm »
39
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by Plebian on November 15, 2020, 01:30:34 pm »
Just go very slow and pay attention to each station per stroke and you shouldn't have an issue at all. It is just easier to mess up a bunch of stuff at once on a progressive reloader over the single stage type.

You can still grab a single stage as well, and if you are like most you will do so. Just to load low volume high precision rounds.
40
Reloading and Handloading / Re: New to reloading, bought a Ferrari to start with
« Last post by lesptr on November 15, 2020, 11:30:27 am »
Well I am now the proud owner of a Dillon 1050, currently set up for 9 mm.    Later I'll be setting up for 10 mm, 5.56, and 300BLK (sub and supers).
Of course now primers, and to a lessor extent powders, are unicorns.  :facepalm

I plan on going VERY slowly at first.   I understand the wisdom of a single stage as a first reloading press but I knew I'd end up with a 1050 eventually and figured that if I am restrained and stern with my self to not try to run before I can crawl I should be alright.    I like my eyes, fingers, ect so I'll be playing it slow and conservative for the first few hundred rounds.


To be honest I'm also worried that as the founder died a few years back that someday the legendary quality could start to slip, so better a machine made now than roll the dice in 4-5 years.

MY lovely wife has suggested getting me a Mr. Bullet feeder for Christmas.....I am a fortunate man.

When I get farther down the rabbit hole I'm thinking about a Corbin bullet swager.
Wow, just wow. So jealous.
I’ve been using a 550 for just shy of a decade and can’t justify going to a 650/750 or 1050. So post some pics so I can drool over yours. 
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10