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21
General Firearms Discussion / Yet another useless ammo burning idea
« Last post by kunkmiester on July 22, 2021, 10:14:37 pm »
They've ruled the trigger cranks are not machine guns.  Has anyone tried a multi pull trigger?  The trigger has multiple...detents I guess is a good word.  At each on the sear is tripped, so a 3/8" pull would be say three rounds.  You need a separate pull for each round like a crank.  I'm thinking a ratchet type layout on the trigger, allowing the action to reset with another latch to release without resetting the trigger.

I'm not the first to have the crazy idea, but a quick google search doesn't bring up anyone who has actually done it, just an old forum thread from 2011 asking about it on the firing line.  Technically it should be legal, but it is in that gray area batfu likes to mess with.

Anyone heard of the idea?
22
R & R / Re: This is my jam.
« Last post by coelacanth on July 21, 2021, 08:54:22 pm »
RIP,  Robbie Steinhardt .  .  . 

23
Strategy and Tactics / Re: Expandable Batons are Useless.
« Last post by coelacanth on July 20, 2021, 12:55:28 pm »
Exactly.  The physics are inarguable.  Parry/parry/ re-position - parry/counterstrike - all techniques with the quarterstaff can be adapted to ambidextrous use and I don't recall ever seeing a fencer capable of that.  Close in techniques using the ends of the staff can be devastating and the transition from defense to offense are often part of the same motion.  As you say, the sword is likely at a disadvantage against the quarterstaff assuming both opponents are reasonably skillful. 

I wouldn't trade my 1911 for one but as a historic footnote, when my great grandparents were travelling to and from the nearest town on business there was always a couple of tobacco sticks in the wagon along with a shotgun and maybe a revolver in a purse or pocket.  The tobacco stick is a about  1 inch square,  about 5 1/2 feet long,  and made of well seasoned, local hickory wood.  You could break one but you'd really have to work at it.  More than one copperhead snake met its end when that stick was picked up and more than one aggressive stray dog was taught the error of its ways as well.  The firearms were reserved for more serious threats. 

The trip to town and back was an all day affair behind a couple of plodding old mules and the road was a lonely, narrow affair through rolling, sparsely populated country for most of it so the means to solve any problems encountered were considered essential. 





24
Strategy and Tactics / Re: Expandable Batons are Useless.
« Last post by Plebian on July 20, 2021, 10:14:51 am »
Points well taken.  A good, stout stick may not have been man's first tool but it was probably the second.  European use of the quarterstaff was old news when the Romans were dominant there.  Some form of baton or stick fighting is featured in every culture I am aware of for exactly the reasons outlined. 

Parry and counterstrike techniques are easier with lighter, shorter sticks ( think escrima ) but watching someone skilled in the use of a full sized staff is amazing.  I know this is a gun forum but ancient weapons have always fascinated me.   :thumbup1

That almost every fencing treatise from Europe has the 'master' holding a quarterstaff while teaching, to defend himself from students with swords. Should be a sign of how effective quarterstaffs are in defense.

It only takes one session of fencing against someone that knows quarterstaff decently well to learn that sword vs. quarterstaff is a losing proposition for the sword. The staff has 2 striking ends, 3 parrying surfaces, and about 4 feet of reach on you without having a close range 'deadzone'.
25
Strategy and Tactics / Re: Expandable Batons are Useless.
« Last post by coelacanth on July 20, 2021, 01:50:56 am »
Points well taken.  A good, stout stick may not have been man's first tool but it was probably the second.  European use of the quarterstaff was old news when the Romans were dominant there.  Some form of baton or stick fighting is featured in every culture I am aware of for exactly the reasons outlined. 

Parry and counterstrike techniques are easier with lighter, shorter sticks ( think escrima ) but watching someone skilled in the use of a full sized staff is amazing.  I know this is a gun forum but ancient weapons have always fascinated me.   :thumbup1
26
Strategy and Tactics / Re: Expandable Batons are Useless.
« Last post by booksmart on July 19, 2021, 10:04:58 pm »
 :thumbup1
27
Strategy and Tactics / Re: Expandable Batons are Useless.
« Last post by Plebian on July 19, 2021, 09:24:32 pm »
I know this is a thread being risen from the dead, but after my session this afternoon at jiu-jitsu with some self defense sparring. It became clear that many folks are overlooking the pure defensive use of a singlestick/baton/walking stick. I am talking pure defensive, parrying incoming strikes, holding measure(distance), increased reach.

What training I have had in European martial arts completely switched the power dynamic. There are about half a dozen folks in the class that can tap me consistently while rolling, and I have no doubt would take me in a 'street' fight. They are just more skilled, faster and younger. A single nylon/foam stick about 2 foot long completely changed that.

I think with very little training a baton can change the dynamic of power completely. Even without the use of the weapon to injure(strike bones/head), the simple ability to parry off grips/strikes is incredible. The fact they have to close a greater distance to reach you also changes the dynamic of the fight.

I had never used the singlestick as a purely defensive tool before in class, but the thought had crossed my mind in the past so I implemented it today. My usual technique was simply to use it to strike key areas, but I think the original video is missing the key part of the baton in 'proper' use. I think our modern ideas on weapons are focused on their offensive use. You defend yourself with a gun by seriously harming the other individual. I always thought the police swords from the 1800s in England were really stupid, but I can see how basically any 'stick' type weapon gives anyone many more options from lethal to very non-lethal with very little training. 
28
General Firearms Discussion / Re: Block 19 lego pistol
« Last post by coelacanth on July 19, 2021, 02:14:53 pm »
Seems to be a lot of that going around.   :coffee
29
Activism and Gun Politics / Re: Second Amendment Rights of 18-to-20-Year-Olds
« Last post by coelacanth on July 19, 2021, 02:12:09 pm »
Good points - well articulated. 

The same crowd that would make the argument that the restriction is on the FFL holder, and therefore on the license, would also argue that private transactions should be banned or regulated under the same standard as FFL transactions.  They would also argue that private transfers of any sort - even from generation to generation for heirloom pieces should be banned or strictly regulated to conform to that same standard.  If there is no legal way for the eighteen year old to exercise the right(s) guaranteed in the Constitution because of statutorily mandated delays the right is denied and thus unconstitutional. 

It may be argued, and probably will, that this is a straw man argument but such laws and regulations already exist and more are in the planning stages.  People elected or appointed to high office(s) are very unhappy when their perceived legal authority is challenged - or negated - or ignored.  They typically redouble their efforts to extend that authority by any means at hand - legal or illegal.   
30
Activism and Gun Politics / Re: Second Amendment Rights of 18-to-20-Year-Olds
« Last post by sqlbullet on July 19, 2021, 12:11:29 pm »
First, let's clear up some terms.  We have here a mixed discussion about the "age of majority" and the "age of license".

The age of majority is the age at which a person acquires legal control over their person, actions and decisions.  This would include things like entering into contracts, criminal and civil liability, voting, enlisting or being conscripted into military service, etc.

The age of license is the age at which a license to engage in an activity is conveyed.  In some cases this is a physical license such as drivers license or associated learners permit.  In other cases this is not a physical license, such as the drinking age of 21 in US states.

The question at hand is whether the purchase of a handgun is a right that comes with legal control over your person, actions and decisions at the age of majority, of is a licensed activity that is granted at a different age.

Since rights are not licensed, then this is a violation of constitutional rights of 18 year olds.  They are born with a right to own arms, but until the age of majority that right is held by proxy by their parent or legal guardian.  Once the age of majority is reached the parent/guardian looses their proxy and the individual directly acquires the right.

An argument can and no doubt will be made, that since an 18 year old can own a gun, and buy a gun, and the actual restriction is not on the citizen but a restriction on the FFL holder, there is not an infringement of rights.  Being a federal gun dealer is a matter of license and is well established.  A regulation they must abide is that they cannot sell a handgun to a person under 21.

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