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Author Topic: WTA's Alcohol Thread  (Read 239857 times)

theirishdragon

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Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
« Reply #675 on: July 09, 2013, 08:11:50 pm »
I finally tried Buffalo Trace after finishing my bottle of Bulleit.  I think I like the Bulleit a little bit better.

Still working on the bottle of Laphroaig; probably try Ardbeg after that's finished.  I happen to like Laphroaig, but I'm cheap, so it only comes out for particular occasions, unlike my brother-in-law, who drinks Islay Scotch like I drink beer.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #676 on: July 09, 2013, 10:24:51 pm »
    For instance, if someone asks you if you want to try Laphroaig, look at them for a moment, then quietly ask them "I thought we were friends? Why would you do that to me?" 

    Like sucking on a smoked brick of peat moss. :vomit

    A friend of mine keeps a bottle around, to sip on once a year, to remind him what good stuff tastes like: "Not that."
    OK, so you don't like it.  That just means there's more for those of us that do.   :cool
    Laphroaig is definitely an acquired taste and not something I'd recommend to a beginner, and perhaps not an ultimate preference by many.  I think I have currently the 10, the Quarter Cask, and the Cask Strength versions in their range.  They are mostly for guests who do like the tarred asphalt rope, iodine medicine cabinet, rubber tire burning sort of sensation!   Actually, it's not that bad, although it takes some getting used to.  The shock to the entire system is part of the attraction for them.  Just about everyone attracted to Laphroaig and the heavy Islay maritime style moves on to Ardbeg, especially the incredible Uigeadail version, once I put a glass of that in front of them.  It combines the attack of Laphraoig with a sweet, mellow smoky intangible balance.  Think about a fine Havana cigar experience.  Heat and sweet, if you will. Brine and shortbread.  Complex.

    Personally, I prefer the more subtle, heathery complex sherried Speysides and Highlanders, for the most part, although I have no clear favorite and my taste varies with the seasons and occasion.  At the moment, I'm enjoying Cragganmore 12, perhaps the most fragile, floral, honeyish complex aroma of them all and amazingly affordable when you can find it.
    I commend you on your taste, sir.  You have developed an educated palate.   I notice one of my favorites in your cabinet - Caol Ila - the 18 year old is superb.   I tend to favor the island whisky when the weather turns cool and damp.   Lagavulin is on the short list along with Talisker and Laphroiag.    You are right about Highland Park - it is one of the very best balanced single malts available.  Highly recommended.

    For those of you not sure about Scotch whisky don't despair.  The blended whiskys are not bad - they just lack the depth of character developed by the single malts over time.   J&B is a good place to start or Dewars White label.  Some prefer Johnnie Walker or Ballantine's but if you just want to see what all the fuss is about you can generally do it for about $25.00.   The same advice for drinking it applies though - straight up with a little water on the side.  If you don't care for the taste of it don't drink it, but by all means avoid trying to hide the taste with a mixer.  It generally doesn't work.  In fact the only mixer I've ever found suitable with Scotch is Drambuie and it actually enhances the peat flavor rather than masking it.
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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #677 on: July 09, 2013, 11:23:55 pm »
    OK, so you don't like it.  That just means there's more for those of us that do.   :cool

    You're welcome to it.   ;)

    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #678 on: July 09, 2013, 11:33:52 pm »
    For some strange reason my Caol Ila 18 is almost empty!  I'll have to suffer through the 12 year version until I can locate another.  The whiskey rating snob/gurus actually rate the 12 higher.  Not so sure, but either is mighty fine.

    One of the distinctives of playing with malt whiskys is that some of them have distinct fruit or vegetable signatures.  To me Caol Ila's signature is that of green olives!  Go figure.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #679 on: July 09, 2013, 11:59:11 pm »
    For some strange reason my Caol Ila 18 is almost empty!  I'll have to suffer through the 12 year version until I can locate another.  The whiskey rating snob/gurus actually rate the 12 higher.  Not so sure, but either is mighty fine.

    One of the distinctives of playing with malt whiskys is that some of them have distinct fruit or vegetable signatures.  To me Caol Ila's signature is that of green olives!  Go figure.
    Yup.  Mine evaporates pretty fast too.    ;)     I can't disagree with your characterization of the olives.  I also find that the 18 is one of the very few single malts that is better neat.  Even a drop of water completely changes its flavor for me.
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #680 on: July 10, 2013, 12:24:57 pm »
    Regarding bourbon and/or other American whiskeys (with an "e"), such as Jack Daniels and George Dickel:

    I remain a fan of Tennessee sour mash blends like the two named above.  I especially enjoy George Dickel.  If only they made a pure or single malt version.   And yes, moving up the scale, George T. Stagg and Baker's 7 Year Old bourbons are truly amazing.  I'm looking for a single malt Tennessee whiskey to try.  I need to research that.  I'm sure there must be some small batch versions of that.  Perhaps Corsair Artisan's Single Malt might come close, if I can find it.

    To the point (and perhaps useless trivial detail):  There is an interesting and not generally known incestuous relationship between the American whiskey industry and the single malts of Scotland.  It's about the barrels and the aging process.  Not only do the same parent companies now own most of the American and Scottish distilleries, but they share resources in an interesting way, going back to far earlier than common corporate ownership.

    A long time ago the Scots figured out that their single malts aged best in a certain type of white oak barrels from a very narrow geographic region in the American Ozarks in southern Missouri.  They also figured out that the best single malt flavors came from those same American oak barrels that had been previously used to age bourbon or Tennessee whiskey.   What emerged is a reverse lend-lease program.  The Scots, then and now buy the oak and have the barrels made and the inside charred (an important element in flavor), all here in the U.S.  They then lend, lease, rent or otherwise permit the American bourbon industry to age American whiskey in those barrels.   

    Then those very same once used barrels get shipped to Scotland where they are used to age single malt whisky.  For example, Glenmorangie uses barrels that have first held Jack Daniels!  So, if the 10 year old Glenmorangie reminds one of what a single malt JD would taste like without the grain whiskey blended into the JD before bottling, there is a reason! 
    « Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:36:50 pm by Mississippi556 »
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #681 on: July 10, 2013, 02:18:10 pm »
    Speaking of which, Gentleman Jack isn't bad stuff, either.

    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #682 on: July 10, 2013, 09:26:15 pm »
    Dickel is indeed my favorite Tennessee whiskey.  Always preferred over Jack Daniels for me.  You mention George T. Stagg - I have already gone on record earlier in this thread as saying it is the finest KSBW being produced today.   Nothing else matches it IMHO.   Probably the closest would be Blanton's or Black Maple Hill.   Any of the Buffalo Trace products are completely acceptable but Bulleit is their equal in the mid range bourbons and the Bulleit rye is VERY good.   :thumbup1














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    louie the lumberjack

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #683 on: July 10, 2013, 11:32:59 pm »
    I liked Bulleit Rye the one and only time I had it, but for the most part I tend to avoid whiskey in spite of my taste for it.  Why?  Turns out it was my grandfather's favorite meal.... so it has to be a particularly bad day for me to go there.

    Besides, I find beer much more interesting, especially once I learned to make my own.  Here's my latest: an amber ale.  This was the first time I tried liquid yeast as well as my first attempt at dry hopping.



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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #684 on: July 11, 2013, 12:17:13 am »
    I can sympathize: alcoholism (and adultery) run in my father's side of the family as well.

    They both stop with me. I will not pass that along to my son.

    Plebian

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #685 on: July 11, 2013, 02:54:25 am »
    I can sympathize: alcoholism (and adultery) run in my father's side of the family as well.

    They both stop with me. I will not pass that along to my son.

    My father's entire side side of the family was outlaws and various folks of less than stellar reputation. My mother's side is all preachers tho. So I should be even steven right? :D

    There has been far too much talk of rye. It makes me wish for some of my cousins canyon run stuff from home.
    Oklahoma"If all our problems are solved, we'll find new ones to replace them. If we can't find new ones, we'll make new ones."

    FMJ

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #686 on: July 11, 2013, 09:07:05 am »
    Last night when I got home from work late and pulled out a beer from the fridge, I noticed that I have Stockholm syndrome when it comes to IPA.  I don't particularly like that flavour it has, but I still drink it.  I even went out of my way to try Arrogant Bastard Ale because of this forum alone.  :hide

    And I would also love to try the Laphroaigh.  Surely, it can't be that bad.  If Glenfiddich is exemplary for a Speyside, it's a bit delicate.  Not bad, but at bit delicate.

    Last but not least for now, a good bottle of Tequila never disappoints the soul.  Not that Cuervo s___ either.
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    Coronach

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #687 on: July 11, 2013, 09:27:55 am »
    There's no shame in not liking IPA. The taste of hops is an acquired one, and IPAs have it in spades. Also, it is not right for some conditions. Like, if I'm hot and thirsty and want something crisp and refreshing, an IPA is the last thing I want.

    Have you tried Belgian beer? Get a nice Chimay. They're taaaaasty. And not overly hopped.

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    Canthros

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #688 on: July 11, 2013, 09:46:21 am »
    Laphroiag really does have some iodine in its flavor profile. I find this pleasantly interesting, but YMMV. (I've a bottle of the Quarter-Cask, at the moment.) I find myself liking it a lot, but ... I might be weird. I drink a lot of tea, at times, and my favorites are Pu Erh (described as having a mineral flavor: it tastes like dirt, really) and Lapsang Souchong (smoke, lots and lots of smoke). But that's another thread.

    My whiskey drinking is pretty limited and narrow (some bourbons; Johnnie Walker in red, black, green and blue; a couple other scotches; and Jameson), so I can't draw a lot of comparisons, especially to other single-malt scotches.

    I'll have to check out the Ardberg. And probably see what I can find airline bottles of the next time I'm at the liquor store. They're overpriced, but much cheaper for experimentation and exploration.

    booksmart: the Corsair Triple Smoke is nice, but not very complex. If Laphroiag is "Smoke! iodine! peat!", Triple Smoke is "SMOKE!!!!!" This is fine, but not very complex. :)
    Kentucky

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #689 on: July 11, 2013, 09:59:11 am »
     :shrug  When I drink Triple Smoke, I get the different flavors of smoke, while with Laphroiag I just got "PEAT!".

    Different smokes for different folks, I reckon.  :cool

    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #690 on: July 11, 2013, 11:04:35 am »
    I had an American style hefeweizen day before yesterday from Phoenix Ale, called Fretzy's .   Uncommonly good.  ( and this from a guy who thinks Widmer's is tolerable and doesn't care for hefeweizen generally  :shocked )  If I may also throw in a couple of other observations, FMJ's point about tequila is well taken.  A good 100% blue agave ( sometimes known as the Weber variety ) is a very nice sipping spirit.  My taste runs toward reposado and in some cases anejo as the bite leaves in favor of a lingering smoothness.  Best I ever had was some stuff called El Tesoro de Don Felipe but at nearly $60 a bottle its a bit out of the ballpark unless its a very special occasion.  More likely you'll find a bottle of Sauza Hornitos in my cabinet.  Reposado generally but anejo if I find it on sale.   :thumbup1

    The other spirit that gets my attention during hot weather is rum.  Haven't found anything I consistently like better than Pusser's British Navy Rum from Barbados.  Straight up, over ice or mixed it is pretty good stuff.
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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #691 on: July 11, 2013, 12:02:41 pm »
    Viva Revolucion!  :D

    JackCrow

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #692 on: July 11, 2013, 12:24:34 pm »
    Mescal....eat the worm!  ;)
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    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #693 on: July 11, 2013, 03:06:30 pm »
    Before we depart Scotland and return to Mexico, I thought I'd bring into the maritime malts discussion that jewel of the Isle of Skye:  Talisker.  The island is formed from volcanic rock.  I'm not sure how that affects the water, the peat or the aging in the barrel, but Talisker is intensely peppery. It is hot

    The 10 year old is so much so that it makes the top of my pretty much bald head break out in a sweat!  No other whisky or whiskey has that effect.  The 18 is more well-rounded but still has the pepper up front.  The 18 is incredible, and once again, I favor the Speysides for the most part.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #694 on: July 11, 2013, 09:28:47 pm »
    There's no shame in not liking IPA. The taste of hops is an acquired one, and IPAs have it in spades. Also, it is not right for some conditions. Like, if I'm hot and thirsty and want something crisp and refreshing, an IPA is the last thing I want.

    Have you tried Belgian beer? Get a nice Chimay. They're taaaaasty. And not overly hopped.

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    The thing is, I kinda like it.  But I don't.  It's Stockholm Syndrome.  :hide

    Let me tell you, London IPA tasts completely different than American IPA.
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

    Coronach

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #695 on: July 11, 2013, 09:38:52 pm »
    Well, yeah. England and Belgium do ales properly. The British Isles pretty much have porter and stout on lockdown, as far as I am concerned. For lagers, you go to the continent. But ales are the province of the British Isles- with a notable exception made for the work of the Belgians, who seem to have been able to blend the rough and blue collar world of ales and lagers with the snooty society of French wine, and come up with something completely unearthly in a bottle.

    We Americans may make all sorts of wonderful new stuff, but for the traditional styles we still bow to our ancestors.

    Mike

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    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #696 on: July 11, 2013, 10:37:24 pm »
    Before we depart Scotland and return to Mexico, I thought I'd bring into the maritime malts discussion that jewel of the Isle of Skye:  Talisker.  The island is formed from volcanic rock.  I'm not sure how that affects the water, the peat or the aging in the barrel, but Talisker is intensely peppery. It is hot

    The 10 year old is so much so that it makes the top of my pretty much bald head break out in a sweat!  No other whisky or whiskey has that effect.  The 18 is more well-rounded but still has the pepper up front.  The 18 is incredible, and once again, I favor the Speysides for the most part.
    Talisker indeed.   :cool     The "Rusty Nail" was made with that exact 10 year old as its inspiration.    The warming effect is why I avoid Scotch whisky almost entirely during the summer.
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    MTK20

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #697 on: July 28, 2013, 12:33:01 am »
    I was surprised by a friend who gave me a bottle of "Russian standard platinum" vodka as a gift, I don't really drink but its really good. I was curious what other vodkas rank high on your list? I have seen grey goose mentioned previously, but what are some others?

    Also if one were to venture into the "finer" whiskey's what would be a good start? I think the nicest I have had was Johnny Walker red and it was fine. With the limited knowledge I have now, I am deciding between gentleman jack or or a different JW (perhaps blue).
    Texas
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    strangelittleman

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #698 on: July 28, 2013, 01:45:43 am »
    Vodka? Sobieski.
    Whiskey (Burbon)? Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam Black.
    Whiskey? Johnnie Walker Black.
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #699 on: July 28, 2013, 03:19:35 am »
    Grey Goose and Russian Standard are what I drink.

    I drink more Grey Goose because that's what we have.  We somehow always end up with a big bottle we get free every year, lol.
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

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