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Author Topic: WTA's Alcohol Thread  (Read 239866 times)

JesseL

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Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
« Reply #650 on: July 07, 2013, 08:36:41 pm »
I found out that Scotch>Bourbon>Rye Whiskey.

 :scrutiny

I love me some good rye.
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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #651 on: July 07, 2013, 11:05:33 pm »

    JesseL

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #652 on: July 07, 2013, 11:08:36 pm »
     :shocked

    I will keep my eyes open for that.
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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #653 on: July 07, 2013, 11:39:19 pm »

    :shocked

    I will keep my eyes open for that.

    Everything else I've had by them - from the Barrel Aged Gin, through the Triple Smoke, to the Insane In The Grain has been top notch stuff.

    And I hate gin. Everything else tastes like floor wax, by comparison.

    FMJ

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #654 on: July 08, 2013, 01:05:17 am »
    :scrutiny

    I love me some good rye.

    I tried Bulleit.

    The way it all felt to me was strange, but I think you'll understand.


    Scotch and bourbon are to the recoil of a .45 Auto, whereas Rye is to the recoil of a .40 S&W.

    :hide
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

    JesseL

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #655 on: July 08, 2013, 01:28:27 am »
    Yep, good rye has a bit of a spicy burn. Not so sweet as bourbon or as peaty as scotch (in ultra generalized terms).

    Definitely it's own thing.
    Arizona

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #656 on: July 08, 2013, 01:54:55 am »
    It wasn't even that it was spicy, but the way aftertaste seemed to not last as long inside the mouth--like it didn't have a follow-through, if you will.

    It was different.
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

    coelacanth

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #657 on: July 08, 2013, 02:35:35 am »
    A lot depends on the recipe.  Bulleit is not bad, though.    :thumbup1
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    Coronach

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #658 on: July 08, 2013, 02:50:53 am »
    Did someone say Rye?

    https://www.thepartysource.com/express/item.php?id=33758

    It's not just rye, its' white dog rye (non-aged...strong stuff).

    These guys are seriously, seriously good. Their reserve bourbon is absolutely delicious. http://middlewestspirits.com/

    Mike
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    FMJ

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #659 on: July 08, 2013, 03:26:48 am »
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

    JesseL

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #660 on: July 08, 2013, 07:04:59 pm »


    With credit to Michael Z Williamson for pointing this out on facebook.
    Arizona

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #661 on: July 08, 2013, 11:30:50 pm »
    Emphasis on rough .   .    .    :facepalm
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    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #662 on: July 09, 2013, 03:22:38 pm »
    Twenty Seven pages!   What a diverse group we are when it comes to how to wet our whistle!   Some simple observations from a new member:

    1.  There is a profound and highly sophisticated interest in all the wonderful nuances of beer.

    2.  Despite number #1, and even though beer and malt whisky (without the "e", meaning I refer to Scotch) are made from the very same ingredients, there seems to be little interest in the fine points of the latter, the distilled brother of ales and lagers.

    Allow me to step forward as a modest and beginner level devotee of single malt whisky.  After all it is from the Gaelic "usquebaugh" shortened to "usque" or "usky" that the Scottish original gave birth to our modern whisky or whiskey.

    I try to keep a well-stocked bar of single malts (see photo below, arranged alphabetically) for sipping with a few carefully selected friends and make an interesting addition from time to time.   I am no expert, continue to learn the endless intracies and regional variations daily, and enjoy the hobby almost as much as shooting.  BTW:  High alcohol content beverages, such as malt whiskys do not age in the bottle, contrary to popular belief and unlike wine.  The aging is only in the oak cask, exposed to the oak.   So, a 12 year old remains a 12 year old, once bottled, no matter how long it is on your shelf.

    Apologies for the poor cell-cam quality.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #663 on: July 09, 2013, 04:00:53 pm »
    I can't read the "O's"... got any Oban in there?

    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #664 on: July 09, 2013, 04:30:34 pm »
    I can't read the "O's"... got any Oban in there?

    Yep.  A 14 year old.  It's to the right of the Macallan 12 and left of the Old Pulteney.  For those of us with access to fresh seafood, it goes extremely well with oysters on the half shell.  Fresh, crisp, clean, slightly salty, firm, dry but smoooooth.  The smoke is relatively mild and comes in late.  A nice choice, sir.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #665 on: July 09, 2013, 04:59:07 pm »
    I would recommend to you some of the other products by Corsair Artisan - the same company I linked to for the Ryemageddon... Very nicely crafted products.

    Occasionally, they make a bourbon called 'Rasputin' from an Imperial Stout beer recipe. I have not tried it, but it sounds fascinating.

    Coronach

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #666 on: July 09, 2013, 05:32:05 pm »
    My distilled beverage experience is very limited. I'm slowly gifting into it. The key, I think, is (like beer) going a step or two above your standard fare. The problem is that this means that you can spend a LOT of money on something that you may not like. Buying a sixer of beer that is awful is bad enough. Buying a $40 bottle of whiskey that turns out to taste like shoe leather is a whole different realm of suck.

    Beer, even good beer, is just so much more accessible.

    Mike

    ETA: My current brown distilled spirits selection is limited. I have a bottle of Dalmore and a bottle of Middle West Spirits OYO reserve bourbon.

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    « Last Edit: July 09, 2013, 05:54:10 pm by Coronach »
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    coyotesfan97

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #667 on: July 09, 2013, 05:40:11 pm »
    I've been drinking some Sam Adams Porch Rocker right now. The first bottles were in a sampler pack.

    It's good right now for the hot humid weather here in AZ right now.  Similar to a summer shandy.


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    ArizonaThe bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.  Thucydides 471BC

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    booksmart

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #668 on: July 09, 2013, 06:02:11 pm »
    Buying a $40 bottle of whiskey that turns out to taste like shoe leather is a whole different realm of suck.

    For instance, if someone asks you if you want to try Laphroaig, look at them for a moment, then quietly ask them "I thought we were friends? Why would you do that to me?" 

    Like sucking on a smoked brick of peat moss. :vomit

    A friend of mine keeps a bottle around, to sip on once a year, to remind him what good stuff tastes like: "Not that."

    JackCrow

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #669 on: July 09, 2013, 06:20:20 pm »
    Very nice selection there M556, congrats.
    I have sampled a fair number of those over the years. I was with a group whose side hobby was single malts when we all got together. Only single malt, nothing less than 12 years was the rule.

    I still love a good single malt, light on the peat.  :thumbup1
    Arizona"First comes smiles, then lies, last comes gunfire." - Roland of Gilead

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    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #670 on: July 09, 2013, 06:25:06 pm »
    My distilled beverage experience is very limited. I'm slowly gifting into it. The key, I think, is (like beer) going a step or two above your standard fare. The problem is that this means that you can spend a LOT of money on something that you may not like. Buying a sixer of beer that is awful is bad enough. Buying a $40 bottle of whiskey that turns out to taste like shoe leather is a whole different realm of suck.

    Beer, even good beer, is just so much more accessible.

    Mike

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    Understood.   I was the same way, and only knew about the run-of-the-mill blended Scotch and a couple mediocre single malts available in most local stores.  Those choices tend to put most people off on what good malt whisky is all about.  in 2005 my wife and I spent a couple weeks in Scotland.  I got to tour a number of distilleries, castles, churches and old battlefields, not necessarily in that order.  Tasting rooms at the distilleries gave me a chance to sample and not have to spend $$ on stuff I would hate later.

    My advice:  Find a friend with a modest collection and offer to pay a little to sample some.  Make sure this is someone into malt whisky and not a guy with a general bar with a couple bottles of single malt.  You'll soon find out what you like best.

    Another option would be to find a good bar in your city with a decent variety and tell the bartender you want to learn and try several different ones.   Don't order them on the rocks.  Order them straight up.   No ice, and with room temperature tap water on the side.  Add your own water, gradually sipping until you get it to your level of dilution.   The water will release the oily esters and open up the nose of the malt.  Ice or cold water destroys this and masks the subtle distinctions that lead to making a good choice.   Once you figure out what you really like, it's no sin to add ice if you prefer it that way.  Chances are they will not have a proper glass, but a brandy sniffer will do in a pinch.  Again, once you figure these things out, you can drink it from a Mason jar, if you prefer.   All the pretentious crap is only helpful at the beginning to use all your senses to separate the ones you like from the ones you don't.
     
    Or, if you can't find a friend like that, I'll offer two recommendations for widely available single malts that are solid "all-arounders" that most people seem to enjoy, regardless of where in the spectrum their preferences lie.  The first is Glenmorangie Original.  The second, is Highland Park 12.  I have yet to find anyone whose tried either of those who was disappointed.  Neither is "expensive" by single malt standards.  Expect $40-45 most places, perhaps a bit more for the Highland Park. 
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #671 on: July 09, 2013, 06:42:52 pm »
    For instance, if someone asks you if you want to try Laphroaig, look at them for a moment, then quietly ask them "I thought we were friends? Why would you do that to me?" 

    Like sucking on a smoked brick of peat moss. :vomit

    A friend of mine keeps a bottle around, to sip on once a year, to remind him what good stuff tastes like: "Not that."

    Laphroaig is definitely an acquired taste and not something I'd recommend to a beginner, and perhaps not an ultimate preference by many.  I think I have currently the 10, the Quarter Cask, and the Cask Strength versions in their range.  They are mostly for guests who do like the tarred asphalt rope, iodine medicine cabinet, rubber tire burning sort of sensation!   Actually, it's not that bad, although it takes some getting used to.  The shock to the entire system is part of the attraction for them.  Just about everyone attracted to Laphroaig and the heavy Islay maritime style moves on to Ardbeg, especially the incredible Uigeadail version, once I put a glass of that in front of them.  It combines the attack of Laphraoig with a sweet, mellow smoky intangible balance.  Think about a fine Havana cigar experience.  Heat and sweet, if you will. Brine and shortbread.  Complex.

    Personally, I prefer the more subtle, heathery complex sherried Speysides and Highlanders, for the most part, although I have no clear favorite and my taste varies with the seasons and occasion.  At the moment, I'm enjoying Cragganmore 12, perhaps the most fragile, floral, honeyish complex aroma of them all and amazingly affordable when you can find it.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    Coronach

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #672 on: July 09, 2013, 06:45:31 pm »
    Good advice. I edited my post while you were typing, I think. I've tasted a little (Glenlivet, Glenmorangie, but those were so long ago I forget what they tasted like), and I have a bottle of Dalmore 12 year. It's good, but a bit of a challenge. I would not say that it is exactly enjoyable, but there is something to it. I would say that I almost like it, but not quite. ;)

    Now, the OYO Bourbon, on the other hand ...

    I've read (and, possibly experienced) that bourbons are easier for newbies to appreciate. Dunno.

    What's your opinion of the Dalmore?

    Mike
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    Mississippi556

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #673 on: July 09, 2013, 06:59:41 pm »
    There is no Dalmore in my collection at the moment. Perhaps that says something.  It is a northern Highlands region product.  Others in the same geographic region are Glenmorangie, Clinelish, and Old Pulteney, all of which I enjoy. Regional soil, water, temperature, presence or absence of heather in both the water and the peat, proximity to the sea, all produce distinct characteristics.   Dalmore seems not to distinguish itself among that group.   One Dalmore I did like and cannot find at the moment, is their Cigar Malt.  It is pretty darned good.

    Of the whiskys above, the most interesting in terms of "good" uniqueness is Clinelish.  Did you ever think a whisky could remind you of the flavor of mustard?  Subtle, but there, almost like mustard seeds were added to the mash.  Quite good with a roast beef sandwich.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    Grant

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #674 on: July 09, 2013, 07:00:39 pm »
      Lol. ok. I'm not gonna be a expert, I think I'll just drink it.  I think I could put waaaayyy too much thought into it  :thumbup1
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

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