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Author Topic: WTA's Alcohol Thread  (Read 237520 times)

Gunnguy

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Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
« Reply #400 on: February 23, 2011, 09:06:34 pm »
Ah...  Low-end fortified wines are wine + malt liquor or neutral grain spirits.  It is illegal to produce fortified wines without a license from the BATFE to do so, as distilling is entirely regulated.  Homebrewing of beer or wine is unregulated for noncommercial purposes below 100 or 200 gallons per year depending on the number of persons in a household.  Much the same as noncommercial firearm manufacture of non-NFA weapons.  It is tax evasion, essentially.

"Party wines" is the homebrew term for sweet or overly fruity wines.  Those are acceptable under the law to homebrew.   They have a very short shelf life (for wines) and should be consumed within six months.

I will take your selection advise into consideration.  But I will likely stick with my current selection for the near future.  Any suggestions are of course welcome.  I'm not exactly a "wine snob".  I got into homebrewing mostly for gift purposes, because I hate shopping and I'm a frugal person.  I'm not cheap by any stretch of the imagination, I just don't waste money when I don't have to do so.  In one batch, I've recouped roughly a third of the capital costs of equipment purposes by giving wine as a gift instead of purchasing roughly equivalents from my state's monopoly of wine and distilled alcohol sales.  Basically I'm spending approximately $4 per bottle (and roughly 3-5 minutes total time per bottle, which is on rough par with traveling to the nearest "good" state store) plus amortization instead of $15-$30 per bottle. 

I actually don't drink that much. 

Uhm...yeah. Was trying to be funny. I don't drink much either. Just that the thought of wines made me think of MD 20/20 and the cheap stuff you find at grocery stores here in Indiana. Saw some funny crap when friends got drunk on MD 20/20. Stupid stuff teenagers do...ah well.
Tell me, how do you do the home brewery/winery thing and what do you use?

Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

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    RevDisk

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #401 on: February 23, 2011, 09:56:32 pm »
    Tell me, how do you do the home brewery/winery thing and what do you use?

    It is virtually the same way that modern commercial wineries and neolithic cavemen made wine.  Crush any type of fruit or other edible plant to produce juice, sterilize it as best as possible, add yeast, keep air out but vent the CO2, and wait a while.

    Obviously modern technology has simplified things greatly.  Advances in bioscience have made it possible for labs to grow high purity yeast strains at low cost.  Advances in chemistry have trivialized sterilization, with some minor cost reduction.  Aside from the invention of plastic, the rest is pretty similar.  Wine is typically stored in a glass carboy during fermentation.  This was introduced in Europe in the 1400s, from Persia where it was invented quite a bit earlier.  On a commercial level, the wine is aged in a metal or wood cask before being put in a glass container sealed with typically wood.  This is also unchanged over the last several hundred years.  Though some wineries are using plastic corks now, which has mixed reviews. 

    Basically, I grab a food grade bucket, clean and then sterilize (roughly 3-6 minutes, filling with water being the most time).  Drain.  Add bentonite and some water for removing excessive amounts of protein from white wines and aiding clarifying for red and white wines.  Mix well.  Pour in grape juice.  Top off with water to reach 6 gallons.  Gently sprinkle yeast (Red Star brand) on the top.  Install air lock into cap.  Put on cap.  Wait a week.  Rack (transfer liquid to another sterilized vessel, but not transfer sediment in the process).  Wait 14 days.  Stop fermentation with metabisulphite and sorbate.  Stir vigorously to drive out CO2.  Add isinglass clarifier.  Top off.  Wait 14 days.  Bottle.  Wait 30 days (theoretically), drink.

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    Gunnguy

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #402 on: February 23, 2011, 10:14:39 pm »
    It is virtually the same way that modern commercial wineries and neolithic cavemen made wine.  Crush any type of fruit or other edible plant to produce juice, sterilize it as best as possible, add yeast, keep air out but vent the CO2, and wait a while.

    Obviously modern technology has simplified things greatly.  Advances in bioscience have made it possible for labs to grow high purity yeast strains at low cost.  Advances in chemistry have trivialized sterilization, with some minor cost reduction.  Aside from the invention of plastic, the rest is pretty similar.  Wine is typically stored in a glass carboy during fermentation.  This was introduced in Europe in the 1400s, from Persia where it was invented quite a bit earlier.  On a commercial level, the wine is aged in a metal or wood cask before being put in a glass container sealed with typically wood.  This is also unchanged over the last several hundred years.  Though some wineries are using plastic corks now, which has mixed reviews. 

    Basically, I grab a food grade bucket, clean and then sterilize (roughly 3-6 minutes, filling with water being the most time).  Drain.  Add bentonite and some water for removing excessive amounts of protein from white wines and aiding clarifying for red and white wines.  Mix well.  Pour in grape juice.  Top off with water to reach 6 gallons.  Gently sprinkle yeast (Red Star brand) on the top.  Install air lock into cap.  Put on cap.  Wait a week.  Rack (transfer liquid to another sterilized vessel, but not transfer sediment in the process).  Wait 14 days.  Stop fermentation with metabisulphite and sorbate.  Stir vigorously to drive out CO2.  Add isinglass clarifier.  Top off.  Wait 14 days.  Bottle.  Wait 30 days (theoretically), drink.



    And Whiskey?
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

    Thernlund

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #403 on: February 23, 2011, 11:17:07 pm »
    Whiskey is distilled rather than fermented.  It's an entirely different process.


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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #404 on: February 24, 2011, 02:40:07 am »
    *As far as bottle stoppers are concerned:

    I personally think synthetic corks are better, and the metal screw caps even more so---since these barriers can better keep out oxygen.  Not to mention you don't have to worry about TCA (cork taint) or an older cork crumbling apart while inside the bottle.

    My $.02 on this anyway...

    [When in Mexico] I actually like the everyday Penfold's line, Koobanunga Hill(spell?).  My favorite is the Cabernet-Shiraz blend.  It's like $8 at Trader Joes (in Mexico  :whistle ).
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #405 on: February 24, 2011, 08:48:09 am »
    Whiskey is distilled rather than fermented.  It's an entirely different process.


    -T.

    I'd say it's more an additional process that a totally different one.  You still have to make and ferment the mash, same as beer but with different grains, then filter out the solids.  That's the point at which the processes diverge - whiskey gets distilled, and beer gets hopped.

    Mmmm....hops.
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    Gunnguy

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #406 on: February 24, 2011, 03:55:26 pm »
    Ok, guys I was being funny again. Sheesh!  :facepalm

    I was raised in W.Va. btw, and I had uncles who made REAL moonshine and oak barrel whiskey. So I know the process.


    Let a guy have a little fun for petesakes!

    Rev, really enjoyed the wine process you discussed. Got a lot out of it. I might try making some. Was surprised by the RED STAR yeast packet you stated. I thought certain wines took certain yeasts you have to by at a store or supplier?

    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #407 on: February 24, 2011, 04:02:24 pm »
    Let a guy have a little fun for petesakes!

    Sorry bro.  Inflection doesn't translate very well in a text medium.


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    RevDisk

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #408 on: February 24, 2011, 10:37:40 pm »
    *As far as bottle stoppers are concerned:

    I personally think synthetic corks are better, and the metal screw caps even more so---since these barriers can better keep out oxygen.  Not to mention you don't have to worry about TCA (cork taint) or an older cork crumbling apart while inside the bottle.

    My $.02 on this anyway...

    [When in Mexico] I actually like the everyday Penfold's line, Koobanunga Hill(spell?).  My favorite is the Cabernet-Shiraz blend.  It's like $8 at Trader Joes (in Mexico  :whistle ).

    Ahhh...  It's an on-going issue.  Synthetic corks are not universally better.  "Different" would be more accurate.  A good rule of thumb is don't buy a red wine with a synthetic cork.  White wines that don't need to be aged, sure.  Also, synthetic corks do not allow a wine to age.  It will chemically be virtually identical from the day it was corked to the day you open it.  Whether it's a week or five years.  Synthetic corks might also be leeching chemicals into the wine.  And lastly, synthetic corks are too new to fully understand.  There are wines that are on the shelves in regular wine stores that are 20-40 years old.  Until synthetic corks are that old (and then some), we won't know the full effects. 

    Screw caps can trap gasses you don't want.  If you're drinking a wine with sulfury gases (ie rotten egg smell), it had a screw cap. 

    TCA is becoming less of a problem due to significant capital investments in quality control by cork manufacturers.  Trust me, EVERYONE in the commercial wine industry is honked at the cork manufacturers and the cork manufacturers are a very competitive market.  Capitalism in action, and whatnot.

    The crumbly cork thing is caused by two things.  Someone used cheap corks, or the bottle wasn't stored on its side.


    There's general rules of thumb.  If you're cracking open the wine within six months, it doesn't matter.  Pick whatever ya like.  If you're concerned with cost, you're going to drink the wine within 3 years and the wine doesn't need aging, synthetic is fine.  If you're concerned about quality and longevity, you want high end cork.  There's cork from a hundred plus years ago that is still doing fine.  Undoubtedly, within the next 50 years (that's REAL quick in the history of wine making), there will be vast improvements in synthetic cork chemistry and manufacture that will mitigate most or all of the current deficiencies.



    Rev, really enjoyed the wine process you discussed. Got a lot out of it. I might try making some. Was surprised by the RED STAR yeast packet you stated. I thought certain wines took certain yeasts you have to by at a store or supplier?

    There's a number of yeasts, but it's not that many.  Typically, your yeast manufacturer offers about five strains, and that's generally enough to cover everything you need.  Is there some weird stuff out there that requires ultra specialized yeast?  Absolutely.  And I never want anything to do with them.  Honestly, if it doesn't need Premier Cuvee, I'm leery of bothering.  Most of them are just different strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    http://www.fermentis.com/FO/80-Wine/80-11_product_rangeHW.asp

    An alternative is Lavlin Dry Yeast. 

    http://www.lalvinyeast.com/strains.asp
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #409 on: February 25, 2011, 02:16:39 am »
    Thanks for your input, Rev.

    I actually haven't "followed" wine stuff for a while, more so considering the state does not trust me with a bottle for a meal.
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    seanp

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #410 on: February 25, 2011, 03:22:01 pm »
    I used to make hooch using wine kits and Lavlin yeast, which would have been the equivelent of the EC-1118 - the highest alcohol resistant yeast.  It would reach a very high alcohol content inside of two weeks.  Never bothered to age it, just filtered and served in two liter cups with chopped up fruit and ice.
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    Gunnguy

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #411 on: February 25, 2011, 05:18:55 pm »
    Sorry bro.  Inflection doesn't translate very well in a text medium.


    -T.

    True Dat, true dat... ;D
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #412 on: February 26, 2011, 05:23:14 pm »
    CaliforniaThere are many like it, but this one is mine.

    Gunnguy

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #413 on: February 26, 2011, 08:11:23 pm »
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #414 on: February 28, 2011, 01:01:53 am »
    Hadn't seen that before.  Excellent!  :rotfl
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #415 on: February 28, 2011, 01:09:31 am »
    I drink a bit of hard liquor, some wine. Don't really care for beer for drinking, use it in cooking sometimes.



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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #416 on: September 17, 2011, 01:37:56 am »
    I have just discovered that an ounce of Captain Morgan added to a bottle of Yuengling lager is a wonderful thing. In retrospect, perhaps it was too tasty. I now need to sober up enough to safely close my eyes. The night is yet young. AVAST!

    seanp

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #417 on: September 17, 2011, 07:42:19 am »
    Heh.  That's essentially a Boilermaker.  They can be dangerous.
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #418 on: September 17, 2011, 08:13:27 am »
    Oh boy!  Depth charges!!  Dropping an ounce of the Captain in a draft beer at the Las Vegas airport can makes things interesting. Oh yeah what happens there stays there! :hide

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #419 on: September 17, 2011, 10:23:25 am »
    I have just discovered that an ounce of Captain Morgan added to a bottle of Yuengling lager is a wonderful thing. In retrospect, perhaps it was too tasty. I now need to sober up enough to safely close my eyes. The night is yet young. AVAST!

    two things to keep track off here.


    Are you holding onto the floor to keep from falling off ?


    and most importantly.


    Are you to drunk to fish ?





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    Chrissmitty820

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #420 on: September 17, 2011, 10:56:19 am »
    Heh.  That's essentially a Boilermaker.  They can be dangerous.

    Make it 151, set it on fire, then drop it in half a beer and drink.

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #421 on: September 17, 2011, 05:01:17 pm »
    Heh.  That's essentially a Boilermaker.  They can be dangerous.

    Make it Irish whiskey and Guinness or Bass and you've got an Irish Carbomb.
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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #422 on: September 17, 2011, 05:38:45 pm »
    Make it Irish whiskey and Guinness or Bass and you've got an Irish Carbomb.

    Bass? BASS?!   :facepalm

    Jameson, Bailey's in a shot glass dropped in half a Guinness. Drink in one go, before the Bailey's curdles.

    There is no substitute.  :beer

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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #423 on: September 17, 2011, 08:19:03 pm »
    Bailey's curdles in citrus juice (lime juice), an acid.  Not in alcohol.  Alcohol takes a long time to cuddle milk, and only if it's warm.


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    Re: WTA's Alcohol Thread
    « Reply #424 on: September 17, 2011, 09:30:24 pm »
    Bailey's curdles in citrus juice (lime juice), an acid.  Not in alcohol.  Alcohol takes a long time to cuddle milk, and only if it's warm.


    -T.

    Going by what a bartender buddy of mine told me  :shrug  Girl at the bar was hesitating about drinking the car bomb, and bartender gave the admonishment.

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