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Author Topic: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"  (Read 3627 times)

RMc

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"Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
« on: December 04, 2013, 11:38:32 pm »
With hunting seasons in full swing this video will get your attention!

The guns are deliberately blown up in the video with smokeless loaded by blackpowder volume and with modern full bore bullets short started with normal hunting loads.

« Last Edit: December 05, 2013, 12:36:17 am by RMc »
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    Mississippi556

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #1 on: December 05, 2013, 02:23:43 pm »
    Wow!  It is pretty scary just to realize that there are actually enough idiot "bubba" types out there that this video needed to be made.  Sadl,y it does need to be made, but those idiots will never see it.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    Brandon

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #2 on: December 06, 2013, 04:58:30 pm »
    This video it is getting expansive very fast.  On a muzzleloader  is it possible to blow the gun up with an over charge?
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    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #3 on: December 06, 2013, 06:37:04 pm »
    Well I know my dad when I was a kid was going to trade a guy for a muzzle loader, he never did much with them despite owning plenty of cartridge guns. Well the guy he was buying or trading from loaded it up for him to test fire it. When fired it peeled like a banana, octagon barrel split back from muzzle to about 6in. from the action in three fairly even steel splits. Amazingly my dad was not hurt, must have been holding things just right etc, but that was the last time he shot a muzzle loader and I don't blame him. We're not certain what happened, obviously something on the loading process, either double charge, maybe double bullet, something. But it was a good lesson that fortunately didn't cause an injury.

    Now I'm not against muzzle loaders, never much spent time with them, can't say I've fired one honestly. I'd be happy to own several at some point just haven't gotten around to it yet. But it's a good reminder that you need to be careful, much the same way as loading your own centerfire ammo, it can be dangerous and it's best to do it yourself so you know what the heck is done;)

    Luke
    MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, [email protected]

    RMc

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #4 on: November 26, 2016, 03:41:51 am »
    Smokeless in a Cap & Ball revolver?

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    coelacanth

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #5 on: November 27, 2016, 12:48:48 am »
    This video it is getting expansive very fast.  On a muzzleloader  is it possible to blow the gun up with an over charge?
    Yes.  If you are using the recommended powder charge and projectile as well as good loading practices you should be alright as long as there is no defect in the gun or any of the other problems mentioned in the OP - BUT - if you double charge the gun or charge it with the wrong grade of black powder you can easily cause a catastrophic failure.  Finer granulations of black powder burn faster and therefore have a more abrupt pressure curve than the coarser granulations.  Most small bore ( .50 cal or less ) muzzle loading rifles work best with FFG or FFFG granulations.  You should avoid FFFFG in any rifle regardless of its caliber.  FFFFG is a pistol or priming powder only. 

    If you are not using factory made powder pellets and are measuring your own charge weights and volumes from loose powder you should refer to the powder manufacturers instructions on making sure your charges are uniform and of the correct size. 

    I am surprised that the video did not mention putting witness marks on the ramrod of your rifle.  That is the one foolproof way I know of to make certain that there is only a single charge in your rifle and that there is no barrel obstruction.  You put the first mark on the ramrod when it is resting against the breech plug of the empty barrel.  If this mark is even with the muzzle of your rifle it has no charge.  The second mark should be made after the rifle has been charged and the projectile seated on top of the powder charge.  If this mark is even with the muzzle your rifle is charge and ready to fire.  If neither mark is even with the muzzle you have a problem and should safely unload the gun ( do NOT simply fire it  ) and find out what the problem is. 

    For the record, I have a very low opinion of CVA muzzle loading firearms.  I would not own one or fire one that belonged to someone else. 

    The lack of quality control exhibited by that company has been appalling over the years and has resulted in numerous lawsuits and a large scale recall of most everything they sold in this country in the late 1990's.  The name "CVA" has been sold to another company which is not honoring any of the previously recall(s).  I don't know if the guns are still being imported from Spain but if they are out of the same factory as the guns that were defective they are an accident waiting to happen IMO.  Buyer beware.  There are reports online from the Chuck Hawks web site written by an acknowledged shooting, and hunting expert by the name of Randy Wakeman.  He is an avid black powder shooter and hunter and has his own web site which I have frequented for a number of years.  I have found his site to be a very good source for credible information on all subjects he covers. 

    Type in an internet search for CVA muzzle loader problems and take a look for yourself. 



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    Brandon

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #6 on: November 27, 2016, 10:35:03 am »
    here is a video of Iraqveteran8888 doing some wrong power testing with a black power rifle

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    scarville

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #7 on: November 27, 2016, 05:21:32 pm »
    Is there any rifle that 120 grains of HS-6 would not blow apart?
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    coelacanth

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    Re: "Dangerous Muzzleloading Practices"
    « Reply #8 on: November 27, 2016, 08:51:05 pm »
    Well, considering that a maximum load for HS - 6 in a modern .44 Remington Magnum is listed a 13.5 grains for a 210 grain bullet, I'd expect not.  I think 120 grains of that stuff would likely frag a 30 mm mortar.   :scrutiny
    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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