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Author Topic: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock  (Read 617 times)

ZackspeeZ

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Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
« on: November 15, 2020, 04:46:42 pm »
Hi all,
I have an 1898 Krag-Jørgensen with a cracked stock and I’m wondering what the best method of repair would be. Any suggestions would be appreciated

Be well,
Zackspeez
Georgia

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    coelacanth

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    Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
    « Reply #1 on: November 15, 2020, 06:03:34 pm »
    Seems like a fairly straightforward question but there are a lot of details involved in a stock repair - particularly of an older rifle like you describe. 

    Where is the damage?  Is it a crack, a split or a fissure?  How extensive is the damage?  Is the existing wood sound or does some of it need to be replaced for an effective repair?  The answers to those questions would indicate " .  .  .  the best method of repair .  .  . " in your case but without them I couldn't, in good conscience, give you any advice on how to proceed.   Could you post pictures of the rifle and detailed pictures of the damaged wood?    :hmm
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    LowKey

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    Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
    « Reply #2 on: November 15, 2020, 08:37:02 pm »
    Very possibly NOT the route you'd wish to take, but I thought I should mention that CMP will do some refurbishment on Krags.
    https://thecmp.org/sales-and-service/services-for-krag-rifle-and-carbine/

    When my father passed I found a Krag in his gun safe, most likely aquired from one of the widows in the retirement community after thier husband had passed and they wanted to be rid of it (happens often).   
    It's lovely, but it's been sporterized and thus no longer has any collectors value AFAIK.   That being the case I plan on eventually sending it off to CMP and getting it put back into original configuration.  Later it will go in a display case with ammo and be taken out and shot once or twice a year for fun.

    Side-note:
    It may not be particularly highbrow of me, but I've decided that my "collection" (as opposed to shooters) will be firing condition US Issue Service rifles, repros acceptable when necessary.

    booksmart

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    Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
    « Reply #3 on: November 16, 2020, 08:30:03 am »
    Seems like a fairly straightforward question but there are a lot of details involved in a stock repair - particularly of an older rifle like you describe. 

    Where is the damage?  Is it a crack, a split or a fissure?  How extensive is the damage?  Is the existing wood sound or does some of it need to be replaced for an effective repair?  The answers to those questions would indicate " .  .  .  the best method of repair .  .  . " in your case but without them I couldn't, in good conscience, give you any advice on how to proceed.   Could you post pictures of the rifle and detailed pictures of the damaged wood?    :hmm

    Yup. Pictures would help us give good answers.

    ZackspeeZ

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    Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
    « Reply #4 on: November 16, 2020, 01:44:23 pm »
    Hi all,
    Thank you for the replies. I will post pictures shortly!
    Georgia

    Roper1911

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    Re: Repairing a cracked Korg Jorgensen wooden stock
    « Reply #5 on: November 21, 2020, 08:47:37 am »
    yeah. without photos it's hard to say. if it's through the wrist, you need to drill and embed a length of all-thread through the crack. other then that, it's highly variable in how it's best to do it. I like to dowel pin any full splits. it's also best to strip the stock of all finish first. I like to refinish with Boiled linseed oil, it takes a long time, but it's the prettiest way IMO.
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