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Author Topic: Rebarreling a Mauser  (Read 4184 times)

Kaso

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Rebarreling a Mauser
« on: December 11, 2017, 03:02:08 pm »
I have a K98 type Mauser in 7.92, and I would like to get it rebarreled into a more common cartridge. (read: more readily available and less expensive ammunition)  I have not yet decided what to chamber it in. .308 is a solid frontrunner, but I might be open to other good ideas.

What I need now are recommendations.  Where do I send it?   Who can do the job properly?  It would need rebarreled, headapaced, and I would like if they could contour the front sight so that will hit POA/POI at 100yds on the '1' setting. (The others will of course be out of alignment with a new cartridge)  This will involve them test firing it at distance.

Has anyone here had something similar done?  How did it turn out?

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    Gundoc

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 07:01:15 pm »
    I have a K98 type Mauser in 7.92, and I would like to get it rebarreled into a more common cartridge. (read: more readily available and less expensive ammunition)  I have not yet decided what to chamber it in. .308 is a solid frontrunner, but I might be open to other good ideas.

    What I need now are recommendations.  Where do I send it?   Who can do the job properly?  It would need rebarreled, headapaced, and I would like if they could contour the front sight so that will hit POA/POI at 100yds on the '1' setting. (The others will of course be out of alignment with a new cartridge)  This will involve them test firing it at distance.

    Has anyone here had something similar done?  How did it turn out?
    KDF can here in Texas can. The problem is that fewer shops want to get the tooling for older military rifles. It's a shame.

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    Kaso

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 09:43:45 pm »
    KDF can here in Texas can. The problem is that fewer shops want to get the tooling for older military rifles. It's a shame.
    I looked at their site...  Wow.  They make some nice rifles.  However... What I am after is to keep the old school look.  Military profile barrel, blued to match the rest of the rifle.  I want the engraving on the barrel to be the only way to tell it is not stock.  Maybe they can still do that?  It just seems that they are a bit beyond mere barrel changes.

    Gundoc

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #3 on: December 12, 2017, 06:40:10 am »
    I looked at their site...  Wow.  They make some nice rifles.  However... What I am after is to keep the old school look.  Military profile barrel, blued to match the rest of the rifle.  I want the engraving on the barrel to be the only way to tell it is not stock.  Maybe they can still do that?  It just seems that they are a bit beyond mere barrel changes.
    I believe they can. And if they run into any problems they will bring it to me. Our owner, Dave use to be his head gunsmith and is still their problem solver for the stuff they can't work through on their own.

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    MTK20

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #4 on: December 12, 2017, 06:57:07 am »
    I believe they can. And if they run into any problems they will bring it to me. Our owner, Dave use to be his head gunsmith and is still their problem solver for the stuff they can't work through on their own.

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    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    tokugawa

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #5 on: December 21, 2017, 01:02:38 am »
    Let me play devils advocate.  I am not sure what your gain would be to do the conversion. Obviously, it is your gun and you can do anything you want with it.  Some points to consider.

     If it has any collector value, re-barreling will devalue it almost totally.

    8mm Mauser has been widely available in inexpensive surplus, there has to be boatloads of it still out there, good for  plinking,if you want to use a lot of ammo.

    8 mm Mauser is widely available in good modern loads for hunting, as it is one of the worlds most common sporting cartridges, and hunting does not use much expensive ammo.

     The cost of a re-barrel will buy a lot of ammo. It is hard to see how it would cost less than $500, with a new barrel, removal, threading, sights, headspacing etc. maybe I am wrong? Maybe you could find a compatible military barrel in .308?

    If you really want a military K98 in .308, consider an Israeli one. You get the caliber, and a collectable rifle.

    if you want a sweet shooting military Mauser in a lighter recoiling, accurate cartridge, it is hard to beat a Chilean 1895 7x57 or a Swede 1896 6.5x55.

     Most of the Mauser military  cartridges like 6.5x55, 7x57, 7.65 Arg, 7.92x57,  are available in good hunting loads. ,  safe for the rifles they were originally chambered in.

    MTK20

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #6 on: December 21, 2017, 11:55:59 am »
    Let me play devils advocate.  I am not sure what your gain would be to do the conversion. Obviously, it is your gun and you can do anything you want with it.  Some points to consider.

     If it has any collector value, re-barreling will devalue it almost totally.

    8mm Mauser has been widely available in inexpensive surplus, there has to be boatloads of it still out there, good for  plinking,if you want to use a lot of ammo.

    8 mm Mauser is widely available in good modern loads for hunting, as it is one of the worlds most common sporting cartridges, and hunting does not use much expensive ammo.

     The cost of a re-barrel will buy a lot of ammo. It is hard to see how it would cost less than $500, with a new barrel, removal, threading, sights, headspacing etc. maybe I am wrong? Maybe you could find a compatible military barrel in .308?

    If you really want a military K98 in .308, consider an Israeli one. You get the caliber, and a collectable rifle.

    if you want a sweet shooting military Mauser in a lighter recoiling, accurate cartridge, it is hard to beat a Chilean 1895 7x57 or a Swede 1896 6.5x55.

     Most of the Mauser military  cartridges like 6.5x55, 7x57, 7.65 Arg, 7.92x57,  are available in good hunting loads. ,  safe for the rifles they were originally chambered in.

    To my knowledge, Kaso is not concerned with the value of this rifle. It isn't a German Mauser. If it was a German Mauser, then I'm sure he would be much more concerned  :cool .
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    Kaso

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #7 on: December 21, 2017, 01:41:17 pm »
    No, it is Spanish.  Not a bad thing, but they do not have any sort of collectors' value.  On top of that, I suspect it may have headspace issues, so I am already looking at that sort of money anyway.

    As it happened, another member offered his Israeli Mauser for a good price, so I will be acquiring that one as soon as our schedules allow it to happen.  This one still needs something, but it will not be a .308 barrel.

    MTK20

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #8 on: December 21, 2017, 02:39:51 pm »
    No, it is Spanish.  Not a bad thing, but they do not have any sort of collectors' value.  On top of that, I suspect it may have headspace issues, so I am already looking at that sort of money anyway.

    As it happened, another member offered his Israeli Mauser for a good price, so I will be acquiring that one as soon as our schedules allow it to happen.  This one still needs something, but it will not be a .308 barrel.

    You scared me for a second (my fault, I misread) I thought you snatched up Sanguines Lee Enfield in 7.62. He posted back in May and I'm not sure if he has sold it yet, but the second I get some cash I would jump all over that rifle  :cool .
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    RMc

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #9 on: December 21, 2017, 05:53:44 pm »

    if you want a sweet shooting military Mauser in a lighter recoiling, accurate cartridge, it is hard to beat a Chilean 1895 7x57...

    M1895 Chilean Contract by Ludwig Loewe are pre-1899 and are considered antiques under GCA68.  No FFL is needed and may be shipped interstate direct to your door - provided there are no restrictive state laws to the contrary.
    Alabama

    tokugawa

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #10 on: December 22, 2017, 03:22:17 pm »
    Spanish, huh?  Hmm.  I wonder if it has already been rebarreled once, to 8mm? (7.92)

      IIRC, Spain went from using the 7mm Mauser to .308 (7.62 ) Sometimes you find those old small ring actions chambered for .308. The Chileans re bored and soldered in a .308 chamber insert on some of their 1895's. . Safety of doing so on a small ring action has been widely debated.

     Regarding collectable  firearms- one thing I have seen over the years is the escalation of pricing on mil-surp weapons, I can remember when an Arisaka or Carcano could hardly been given away. Even Swede Mausers in perfect shape were dirt cheap, but all that military surplus is mostly dried up now.  Funny thing is the lesser thought of weapons can have really interesting histories. I would love to have a nice Mexican Mauser from the 19 teens. Or a 1893 Spanish Mauser in 7x57.  What they have seen! Those weapons were the workhorse of a world in flux.

    Kaso

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #11 on: December 23, 2017, 01:46:35 pm »
    Spanish, huh?  Hmm.  I wonder if it has already been rebarreled once, to 8mm? (7.92)
    I doubt it.  The numbers all match the receiver, which is dated 1954 - about 2-3 years before Spain switched to the CETME and 7.62.


    Regarding collectable  firearms- one thing I have seen over the years is the escalation of pricing on mil-surp weapons, I can remember when an Arisaka or Carcano could hardly been given away. Even Swede Mausers in perfect shape were dirt cheap, but all that military surplus is mostly dried up now.
    I understand that.  I saw some of it myself.  Pre-Obama, many of these rifles were plentiful and cheap.  Mausers for $200, Steyrs for $150, and Mosins for $40.  After the election there was a run on everything, and supply was depleted.  Not to say supply would not have dried up soon enough... but that is what did it all at once.

    As it stands, Spanish Mausers have an undeserved reputation for low quality.  They are valued about what a better Mosin is.  While some day we may all lament that all those poor Mosins got cut up and sporterized, that is not going to be for a long while.  I think the same will be for the Spanish Mausers.

    tokugawa

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    Re: Rebarreling a Mauser
    « Reply #12 on: December 24, 2017, 12:53:18 am »
    You must have one of the last ones produced- I had no idea Spain ever used the 8mm.  Ball's Military Mausers indicates the 8mm was adopted by Spain in 1943, and they transitioned to the cetme .308 in the early-mid 50's, as you stated.
    He says the Spanish- German ties led to the adoption of the 8mm.
     A pretty cool rifle in any case! 
     
     just out of curiosity, how does it shoot?

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