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Author Topic: old smith and transfer bar safety?  (Read 3472 times)

MTK20

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old smith and transfer bar safety?
« on: March 08, 2014, 04:56:33 pm »
I've got an old smith and Wesson model 28. I am not aware of when they started putting transfer bar safeties in revolvers and I would like to know if this one has one. I was told this particular one was purchased in the 1970's and with my little experience and naked eye all I can tell us that the firing pin is part of the hammer spur itself.

What do y'all think? Can I load it to five or fully to six?

I believe I see a transfer bar, but figured this might not be a bad question to ask on a boring Saturday afternoon.
Texas
Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

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    Mikee5star

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #1 on: March 08, 2014, 05:45:23 pm »
    Pointy Hammer = No Transfer Bar.  These Smiths use a rebounding hammer IIRC, it will not hit the primer unless the hammer is at full cock.  Single actions W/O transfer bar load 5, double actions load 6.  That is what I do, and I have not had an ND with out my finger on the trigger. 
    Alaska

    MTK20

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #2 on: March 08, 2014, 06:08:16 pm »
    Thanks mike! Six it is then! I still am not eager to drop it to fully test the theory, but I take your word for it  :cool.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    Mikee5star

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #3 on: March 08, 2014, 06:28:14 pm »
    Thanks mike! Six it is then! I still am not eager to drop it to fully test the theory, but I take your word for it  :cool.

    I have not done a deliberate drop test either.
    Alaska

    strangelittleman

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #4 on: March 08, 2014, 06:48:24 pm »
      Yes, it has a "transfer bar safety" S&W actually refers to it as a safety hammer block system, but for the purposes of this discussion, we'll call it the T-bar  ;). You see the firing pin channel in the frame? Look just below it, at the little rectangular bar w/ the slight bevel, that's it.
     
      One can also tell by looking at the side of the hammer. See the 90 degree cut out just below the hammer nose and firing pin? That's one of the engineering changes that was made  sometime after WW2 (mid-1950's for most models IIRC) to accommodate the transfer bar in the frame. Every S&W I own has this feature, from the 1958 K-38 to the 386NG.
     
      When the trigger is released after you've fired and returns to the forward position you'll notice the hammer retracts back out of the frame and is blocked by the T-bar. It's safe to load w/ 6.
     
      S&W continues to employ this safety system in it's newer and current frame mounted firing pin models (which is pretty much all of them these days)
     
      That revolver is a classic!  You're a fortunate man.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #5 on: March 08, 2014, 09:14:52 pm »
    Yup. Six is good to go but do a function test first.  UNLOAD the revolver.  Double check to make certain the revolver is unloaded,  Cock the hammer, then take the heel of your hand and bump the hammer.  Don't slam it hard, just bump it.  You are checking sear engagement and if the hammer drops as you bump it the hammer/sear engagement is out of spec. and unsafe to carry.  No hammer drop when bumped and you're good to go.
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    Mikee5star

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #6 on: March 09, 2014, 12:05:13 am »
      Yes, it has a "transfer bar safety" S&W actually refers to it as a safety hammer block system, but for the purposes of this discussion, we'll call it the T-bar  ;). You see the firing pin channel in the frame? Look just below it, at the little rectangular bar w/ the slight bevel, that's it.
     
      One can also tell by looking at the side of the hammer. See the 90 degree cut out just below the hammer nose and firing pin? That's one of the engineering changes that was made  sometime after WW2 (mid-1950's for most models IIRC) to accommodate the transfer bar in the frame. Every S&W I own has this feature, from the 1958 K-38 to the 386NG.
     
      When the trigger is released after you've fired and returns to the forward position you'll notice the hammer retracts back out of the frame and is blocked by the T-bar. It's safe to load w/ 6.
     name
      S&W continues to employ this safety system in it's newer and current frame mounted firing pin models (which is pretty much all of them these days)
     
      That revolver is a classic!  You're a fortunate man.

    Bold: is the name I was thinking trying to remember when I said rebounding hammer.

    Italics:  I always think of frame mounted firing pins with transfer bar safety's.

    Listen to SLM before me.  He know's his stuff.
    Alaska

    MTK20

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    Re: old smith and transfer bar safety?
    « Reply #7 on: March 09, 2014, 04:34:31 am »
    Thanks guys! Btw the hammer/hand bump test went very well, coelacanth  :thumbup1.

    SLM: thank you! Yes, the moment I saw this no longer produced classic I knew I had to have it. It has a little wear, but as a lover of wheelie booms, old things, and LEO's I think I could've done a lot worse for $400.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

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