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Author Topic: Question for LEO's...  (Read 6026 times)

Coronach

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Re: Question for LEO's...
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2012, 05:03:31 am »
Probably not a patrol unit, though I don't know for sure, obviously. We have a couple of specialized units that roll around in plain cars and wear tac gear. Some of them (eg, Gang Unit) have areas that they routinely check and would be well known to the locals, but even so they are not patrol units in the sense that you think of when you say 'patrol'. For example, they would not be showing up in tac gear to take a report on your fender bender.

Mike

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    Daylight

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #26 on: August 17, 2012, 07:24:34 pm »
    Legal in most places. Sometimes it is an additional charge to wear them in commission of a crime.

    I haven't been able to get rid of the idea of Martha Stewart breathing a sigh of relief that she wasn't wearing a ballistic vest when she insider-traded.
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    Tanner

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #27 on: August 17, 2012, 09:56:37 pm »
    I would love a "Class B" uniform to patrol in and you know, do actual police work.  Then have the Norman Rockwell "Class A" uniform for ceremonies or desk duties.  The dress pants with the stripe are like $75 a pop, and they do not hold up well to hard use.

    But then I got promoted to Sgt a while back and now I am the guy saying "wear your hats"...   :facepalm

    Ours hats are more like Chicago PD's though, except no taxi-cab stripe above the brim.
    MichiganTanner


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    akodo

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #28 on: August 18, 2012, 03:08:39 am »
    Usually the 'in commission of a crime' clause is reserved for scenarios in which the item in question assists in the commission of said crime. So, bad for armed robbery, irrelevant to reckless operation of a MV.

    Usually. Silly places may do silly things.

    Mike

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    I've seen laws for ballistic vests where wearing them during the commission of a felony means more severe sentences...but they also had a clause in there that it didn't apply to police and security guards.

    Believe me, if police and security guards are out committing felonies with their vests on, I want the book thrown at them just as much as a gangbanger who is wearing a vest during his felonies.

    seanp

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #29 on: August 18, 2012, 09:16:52 am »
    Some of them (eg, Gang Unit) have areas that they routinely check and would be well known to the locals...

    To some extent doesn't that defeat the purpose of driving in an unmarked?
    "Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave."
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    Coronach

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #30 on: August 18, 2012, 07:45:21 pm »
    Yes and no.

    It makes them harder to spot on approach, so they're able to get up on a scene and see what is happening before everyone is all "5-0! Cops com'n!" That, alone, is an advantage. It also prevents people from approaching them and bogging them down with requests for service when they're supposed to be doing other stuff. They're plainclothes, not patrol, but they're also not supposed to be covert.

    Mike

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    sarge712

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #31 on: August 18, 2012, 08:55:22 pm »
    Here's what might make a good police uniform, if ol' Nightcrawler were in charge:

    The uniform is made of lightweight, breathable, 50/50 nylon/cotton ripstop. Low maintenance and comfortable. Shirt has bi-swing shoulders and is cut to stay tucked in. Velcro on chest pockets and low profile buttons. Check

    Name and badge are sewn on. Check

    Pants are same material, BDU style with cargo pockets. . . Cut so that you can move in them, run in them, hop fences in them. Check

    Alternative hats are a wool watch cap for winter and a ball cap with agency ID on it. Check but we still have Smokey Bears for parades, funerals, etc. I carry a cowboy hat on my front seat for the almost daily rain we get here. My chief thinks its cool and so far I haven't been told to cease and desist...but so far a police commissioner or tribal council member hasn't complained yet. :bash

    The vest is Level IIIA, with good side coverage and stab resistance. Designed to be lightweight and breathable. It is worn over the uniform shirt. It has high-vis agency ID panels and a couple pockets for little stuff, as well as places for radio mikes and such. It's not intended to be a loaded-up IOTV or anything. Check sorta. We have a throw over vest carrier issued to each of us to use at Harley rallys, concerts etc. that we can slip our patrol vest inside of

    The gun belt carries the sidearm and most of the other police equipment. Holster rides a little lower to clear the vest. Check

    Every cop carries a small trauma kit in his cargo pocket, including tourniquets he can put on himself if need be. This does not replace the first aid kit in the car, but allows him to perform immediate self aid if wounded. Check (some of us do and we are issued same but most don't)

    Each officer is also issued a layered Gore Tex ensemble for inclement weather. This includes jacket and pants, a designed around allowing access to his duty belt and being comfortable. Check on the jacket (actually two, one winter and one summer weight) but no pants

    A plate carrier with rifle plates and ammo pouches for carbine or shotgun rides with those weapons. Designed to be quickly thrown on over the duty vest and work with the duty belt. Check on order and on the way
     

    Very good points and my PD is up on most of them. We started out a few years ago with a poly cotton BDU type patrol Class B that was similar in fabric to a Dickies mechanic's work clothes. When washed and faded that's exactly what it looked like. They were good in winter as they blocked the wind better then the traditional polyester uniforms but most of us have gravitated back to the 100% polyester in a BDU cut becasue its cooler due to breathability and it dries in a snap as we are in a high humidity work environment. Even in winter it is prefered since it dries so fast although the wind blows right through it. It also has a stretch factor that the "Dickies" cloth didn't. We are isssued one pair of Danner Acadia boots every two years or we can get one pair of Under Armor, Oakley or Converse boots once a year. 5.11 rain gear tops it all off.
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    Speak the truth always even if it leads to thy death.
    Safeguard the helpless and do no wrong.
    That is thine oath.

    Gunnguy

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    Re: Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #32 on: August 18, 2012, 09:07:32 pm »
     :facepalm
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

    Avenger29

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    Question for LEO's...
    « Reply #33 on: August 19, 2012, 11:50:08 am »
    Yes and no.

    It makes them harder to spot on approach, so they're able to get up on a scene and see what is happening before everyone is all "5-0! Cops com'n!" That, alone, is an advantage. It also prevents people from approaching them and bogging them down with requests for service when they're supposed to be doing other stuff. They're plainclothes, not patrol, but they're also not supposed to be covert.

    Mike

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    I just assume a charger or crown Vic is automatically a cop unless it's a donk...then I know it's an ex cop car...
    South Carolina
    I don't THINK I'll ever have to face down routers in the streets.

    I should hope not. Mobs of rogue woodworking tools would suck to repel.

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