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Author Topic: Back when America BUILT stuff  (Read 45124 times)

Raptor

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Re: Back when America BUILT stuff
« Reply #125 on: November 22, 2021, 12:00:54 pm »
Blind driving wheels (i.e. no flanges) were not uncommon on steam locomotives, though IIRC in the US those were typically used on narrow-gauge locos that ran on lines with extremely tight turning radiuses.  Never heard of drivers that could move side-to-side before. I suspect the damage wrought by the AA-20 was a result of the locomotive's massive size and weight rather than the flangeless drive wheels.

N&W 611, for example, is the largest and heaviest piece of equipment to ever operate on the Strasburg Rail Road, so when she visited for the first time back in 2019, there were serious concerns that she might damage the track, especially the switches.  Fortunately, the track held up just fine (though you could hear the rails squealing in protest when she passed over some of the tighter-radius curves going into and out of switches).
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Back when America BUILT stuff
    « Reply #126 on: November 22, 2021, 12:43:43 pm »
    I imagine that the loading of the contact points between the wheels and the rails would have been tremendous in that case and probably caused mechanical deformation as well as heavy abrasion in places.  My reference was to the notation that the trains using that locomotive frequently derailed.

    That can be caused by a number of things but the whole point of the flanges on the wheels is to keep that from happening.  Fewer flanges would reduce the ability of the system to operate safely - IMO. 

    I like the fact that this is the only forum, not actually dedicated to railroads, where I can discuss such things.   :thumbup1
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