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Author Topic: A different Sunday, December 7th, 73 years ago  (Read 1497 times)

THE NORSEMAN

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A different Sunday, December 7th, 73 years ago
« on: December 07, 2014, 12:14:59 pm »
We all know the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and while some or even most here may already know, here's what Admiral Nimitz had to say on the subject after taking a tour of the wrecked harbor and the mistakes the Japanese made-
 
Mistake number one: the Japanese attacked on Sunday morning. Nine out of every ten crewmen of those ships were ashore on leave. If those same ships had been lured to sea and been sunk--we would have lost 38,000 men instead of 3,800.

Mistake number two: when the Japanese saw all those battleships lined in a row, they got so carried away sinking those battleships, they never once bombed our dry docks opposite those ships. If they had destroyed our dry docks, we would have had to tow everyone of those ships to America to be repaired. As it is now, the ships are in shallow water and can be raised. One tug can pull them over to the dry docks, and we can have them repaired and at sea by the time we could have towed them to America. And I already have crews ashore anxious to man those ships.

Mistake number three: every drop of fuel in the Pacific theater of war is in top of the ground storage tanks five miles away over that hill. One attack plane could have strafed those tanks and destroyed our fuel supply. That's why I say the Japanese made three of the biggest mistakes an attack force could make.

Thought it a fitting day to share this for those who may not have known.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 12:39:18 pm by THE NORSEMAN »
This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

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    TommyGunn

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    Re: A different Sunday, December 7th, 43 years ago
    « Reply #1 on: December 07, 2014, 12:28:48 pm »
    Yea....
    They also did not take out our submarines or our aircraft carriers (carriers were at see IIRC) and those two elements alos played a big role in the Pacific Theater of WW2.

    December 7th ...."A day that will live in infamy."
    "Through ignorance of what is good and what is bad, the life of men is greatly perplexed." ~~ Cicero.

    THE NORSEMAN

    • To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them. - Richard Henry Lee
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    Re: A different Sunday, December 7th, 73 years ago
    « Reply #2 on: December 07, 2014, 12:48:19 pm »
    Enterprise, under Admiral Halsey, was on the return trip from Wake Island.

    Lexington, under Rear Admiral Newton, was in the Midway area.

    The Saratoga was at San Diego.

    Yorktown, Ranger and Wasp were with the Atlantic fleet. 

    http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq66-9.htm

    As for US subs? 
     
    There were four U.S. submarines in Pearl Harbor during the attack:

    USS Narwhal (SS-167)

    USS Dolphin (SS-169)

    USS Cachalot (SS-170)

    USS Tautog (SS-199)

    http://www.bowfin.org/submarine/faq

    Japanese subs?  This gets interesting-

    Quote
    The remains of a Japanese mini-submarine that participated in the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor have been discovered, researchers are to report today, offering strong evidence that the sub fired its torpedoes at Battleship Row.

    That could settle a long-standing argument among historians.

    Five mini-subs were to participate in the strike, but four were scuttled, destroyed or run aground without being a factor in the attack. The fate of the fifth has remained a mystery. But a variety of new evidence suggests that the fifth fired its two 800-pound torpedoes, most likely at the battleships West Virginia and Oklahoma, capsizing the latter. A day later, researchers think, the mini-sub's crew scuttled it in nearby West Loch.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2009/dec/07/science/la-sci-minisub7-2009dec07



    This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

    xsquidgator

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    Re: A different Sunday, December 7th, 73 years ago
    « Reply #3 on: December 08, 2014, 10:33:28 pm »
    When I was a USN submarine JO 20-some years ago, I had a surreal experience at Pearl Harbor Sub Base where we (USS Francis Scott Key) were tied up.  A JDF submarine was tied up two or three berths down from us, doing a port visit and some training.  Walking on the pier past the JDF boat, I received and returned a salute from one of her crew, just a couple hundred yards east of the USS Arizona memorial.  Who would have seen the post-war changes back then?

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