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Author Topic: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .  (Read 1850 times)

coelacanth

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the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
« on: October 17, 2021, 03:04:57 pm »
I suppose this is only tangentially related to guns but when we discuss that small category of items often referred to as "EDC" the wrist watch is almost never mentioned.  Due to an unfortunate accident I was recently deprived of my long time companion.  Even the robust and very well made ETA 2824-2 caliber is not designed to withstand being dropped from five feet above a hard surface.  As someone once said, "Its not the fall that kills you - its that sudden stop at the end.".  Indeed.   :facepalm

The watch in question is an Ollech&Wajs UDT Professional model, stainless case and bracelet, dive rated.  As it turns out the watch was repairable and I took the opportunity to replace the crystal as well.  The shop I used was located in another state as I was not enthusiastic about the local shops I had dealt with.  The online reviews were good and after a brief, confidence inspiring conversation with the shop owner ( also the guy doing the repairs ) I decided that was the place I wanted to do business with.  The parallels between this process and what we go through in looking for a competent, reliable gunsmith are uncanny.  Perhaps that is because the technical nature of the work, the level of precision and the the costs involved are also very similar. 

The happy ending is that the old beater is back on my wrist where it belongs and is currently pacing the atomic clock, digital receiver in the house without error.  It feels like an old friend has returned to me and the reassuring weight of the thing just puts a grin on my face after its absence. 

All this brings me back to the "EDC" thing.  Very few items regularly occupy our close personal space and fewer still that we interact with several times a day.  For me those items have to be not only supremely functional but they need to have some sort of aesthetically pleasing design characteristics.  The pocket gun or other concealed carry gun is what we have focused on here over the years but most days I get a lot more use out of my watch, my pen, my pocket knife ( or small fixed blade ), vehicle keys, and a few other things I generally don't leave home without. 

It seems to me that this is a phenomenon has existed since before the dawn of recorded history.  I can well imagine a Cro-Magnon husband and wife conversation around the camp fire or in a cave somewhere revolving around, "Have you seen my ( stone axe, bone needle, throwing stick, etc., etc. ) ?  I remember leaving it here but now I can't find it.".   :whistle    Its the reason such things as pouches and pockets and carry bags were invented.  It is also the reason why such things as wrist watches, writing instruments, pocket knives and other accoutremont are still popular long after the actual need for these things has mostly disappeared form modern life.   Perhaps we are not so different from our ancestors as we like to think.   :cool
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    cpaspr

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #1 on: October 19, 2021, 07:31:17 pm »
    Maybe not "needed", but after 50+ years of wearing one, I often feel naked without one.  And last weekend, because my 34 year old beater watch needs a new battery, having to reach for my phone to check the time just felt weird.
    Oregon

    coelacanth

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #2 on: October 24, 2021, 02:54:51 pm »
    Agreed.  My oldest beater is an electric Timex "Dynabeat" from 1978? maybe.  It needs to be cleaned and re-oiled and a new battery installed but for now it occupies "that box" of stuff related to watches we all seem to accumulate over time. 

    Sometimes I have to think hard to remember where my cell phone is and so far I haven't needed Mrs. c to call it so I could find it by listening for the ring tone.  The watch, however, is always on my wrist unless I'm sleeping or elbows deep in something.  I guess it is maybe a generational thing but the habit is deeply ingrained at this point.  The good news is, barring another accident the wristwatch is probably good to go for another four years or so before it should be ready for another COA.  Just wearing it daily provides the energy necessary for the mechanism to run.  No batteries?  No problem.   :cool



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    GeorgeHill

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #3 on: December 19, 2021, 12:17:36 am »
    I have a pretty good watch collection...
    Over 20 different units spanning the price range to well over a thousand dollars... Nothing too extraordinary. Nothing James Bond might wear. I love my Seikos.
    But the watch that I am most fond of... The one I wear most often... Is a $50 watch I got at Walmart.  A Casio Duro.  It's Casio's simple, basic Dive Watch. The one with the Dolphin icon on the face. It's rugged, it's clean, and it's just very damn good. Period. Not "for the money"... Overall. It might not be as fancy or aristocratic... It's just a good solid watch.
    I put a leather NATO strap on it, and it's done soldiers service for about a decade now with only one battery change.  You can't beat it.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #4 on: December 19, 2021, 03:23:15 pm »
    Yup.  Casio nailed it on that one.  A lot of their line has gone over the top design wise but its still hard to beat the original "G Shock" model in terms of reliability and bang for the buck.   I still have an old Timex "Dynabeat" electric from the mid seventies that refuses to give up the ghost and runs happily for many months with a new battery.  It doesn't get daily wear but is more a museum piece from my misspent youth.   :cool

    Seikos are cool too.  My "dress watch" is a Victorinox quartz movement but the first serious timepiece I owned ( and still do ) is a Seiko " Railroad Watch" with a quartz movement from the 1990's.  Unfortunately most folks don't seem to understand that although the quartz crystal that keeps the time in such a movement is completely maintenance free - the geared movement responsible for actually advancing the hands around the dial still requires periodic cleaning, oiling and adjustment to work properly.  Modern synthetic lubes are much better than the stuff used fifty years ago but nothing lasts indefinitely. 

    So, who wants to start a thread about fountain pens .  .  .   :whistle



    Arizona" A republic, if you can keep it."

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    sqlbullet

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #5 on: December 20, 2021, 10:09:00 am »

    So, who wants to start a thread about fountain pens .  .  .   :whistle


    Or mechanical pencils  :D
    Utah

    MTK20

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    Re: the ubiquitous wrist watch . . .
    « Reply #6 on: December 29, 2021, 06:47:54 am »
    I missed this one.

    I had worn my old leather watch band for about 4 years until I broke the fixed/sewn in loop on it.... And then continued to wear it some more for a few more months. Finally got a new strap for it yesterday and it is quite comfortable (more so than my leather one was). I love leather, but I am giving the NATO strap a try. My time piece is a Hamilton automatic and it is the only watch I intend on owning. I am noticing it is about time for it to get cleaned, oiled, and adjusted, so that is next on the to do list.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
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