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Author Topic: Killer Kydex  (Read 2223 times)

Gundoc

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Killer Kydex
« on: April 16, 2016, 02:54:25 pm »
You have to check out what these guys can do with holsters. It goes way beyond stock patterns.

http://www.gundocdoctrine.com/#!Killer-Kydex/k79t9/56bf5ab50cf251d9bc9cfa7d

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    MTK20

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #1 on: April 16, 2016, 04:46:01 pm »
    These look good!
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    StevenTing

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #2 on: April 18, 2016, 03:35:37 pm »
    I would have been extremely disappointed with that holster being so faded.  Then again, I'm more likely to just go with a plain jane black.  I only have one kydex holster and it came with a gun that the former owner made.  Works so far but I still have my preference for leather.

    However, I have recently picked up a Glock and haven't decided yet if I will go Leather or Kydex.
    Utah

    StevenTing

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #3 on: April 18, 2016, 03:40:19 pm »
    And why is it that Kydex always has so many rivets?  Isn't there a process where they can melt the two layers together so it becomes seamless?  If not, someone needs to invent and patent the process.
    Utah

    coelacanth

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #4 on: April 18, 2016, 03:52:37 pm »
    I think its because Kydex thick enough to work well as a holster is tricky to mold into complex shapes.  Simpler panel details seem to turn out better with less waste and better conformity to design specs.  Drilling holes and setting rivets is a lot faster, easier and cheaper than the more complex molding procedures necessary to reduce the number of rivets.   :shrug
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    sqlbullet

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #5 on: April 18, 2016, 04:32:37 pm »
    Best bet would be to glue the Kydex rather than try to melt it together.  There are a couple of problems with heat bonding without a glue.

    First, Kydex off-gasses enough at flexible temps that they suggest very, very, very strongly that you not heat it in an oven that will be used for food.  That means even more off-gassing once you got it melted.

    Second, all those noxious chemicals that are gassing out of the Kydex had a job to do in the material to begin with.  Their loss means the melt bonded joint is compromised.  If I were to guess, I would guess it will be very brittle.

    You can make some glue to bond it.  They have instructions.  Basically mix 45% tetrahydrofuran with 10% Kydex shavings until dissolved, then add 45% MEK.  The resulting glue is basically the same as PVC cement from Home Depot, except instead of PVC in the mix it has Kydex.  The THF and MEK will chemically "melt" into the sheet, allow the three Kydex layers (two sides and the 10% in the glue) to bond, and then evaporate, leaving a chemical weld.  Follow the same ventilation precautions as using PVC cement.

    However, sealing it tight is not always desirable.  Kydex can't breathe, so gaps such as those created by riveting, mean better airflow and breathability of the product.

    Also, rivets can be used in the cold without opening windows, killing brain cells, or causing cancer.
    Utah

    Gundoc

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    Re: Killer Kydex
    « Reply #6 on: May 10, 2016, 10:58:20 am »
    I would have been extremely disappointed with that holster being so faded.  Then again, I'm more likely to just go with a plain jane black.  I only have one kydex holster and it came with a gun that the former owner made.  Works so far but I still have my preference for leather.

    However, I have recently picked up a Glock and haven't decided yet if I will go Leather or K
    I would have been extremely disappointed with that holster being so faded.  Then again, I'm more likely to just go with a plain jane black.  I only have one kydex holster and it came with a gun that the former owner made.  Works so far but I still have my preference for leather.

    However, I have recently picked up a Glock and haven't decided yet if I will go Leather or Kydex.

    I have to admit...that was a decent sized let down. If you're going to put out something to help you get more sales...put your best foot forward.

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