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General Topics => R & R => Automotive => Topic started by: Mikee5star on May 30, 2018, 12:08:12 pm

Title: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on May 30, 2018, 12:08:12 pm
A few weeks ago I was preparing to head out of town for work, so I changed the oil in my wife's market truck and added about a pint of anti-freeze to the radiator.  I drove home after work on Tuesday with propane tanks filled and to make the kiddo's school concert, while following them home to swap trucks and get some food, I started smelling burnt sugar.  When I got her 1994 Toyota in site it was billowing clouds of white smoke.  As the 3.0l v6 has a reputation for losing head gaskets that was my assumption.  When we called the mechanic we were quoted $1400.  As we had only paid $1500 for the truck, and the gauges did not work, a decision was made to send it off to a new home.

As I was working up the road where they have car dealerships I went looking for a new, used rig for the family and market.  My wife grows tomatoes commercially and sells primarily at the local farmers market.  So we ended up with a Certified Pre-Owned 2016 F 150.   So far we are happy with this truck.  Pics will follow.

Does anyone on here have experience with Ford's 3.5l v6?  I know that it is a turbo charged engine, but have done no research.  We are getting right at 20 MPG in a 4x4 crew cab truck, which is better than any other vehicle we own.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on May 30, 2018, 02:20:30 pm
None.  My experience with Fords has been confined to normally aspirated engines.  I had the 5.7 V-8 in my late, lamented 2004 F-150.  I have driven the EcoBoost engine in a truck and it produces impressive performance for a small displacement engine but I come from an era when big cubic inches loafing along at low rpms was always the way to go.   :shrug   
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: RetroGrouch on June 14, 2018, 03:37:11 am
I've owned a 2014 F-150 with the turbo v-6 and I've had no problems with the engine.  I think we're over 40k on it now.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mississippi556 on June 15, 2018, 11:43:40 am
Ford's EcoBoost technology is mature.  It comes from their collaboration with Mazda and Volvo when they were a part of Ford.  Both of those companies have deep experience in turbocharged engines.  Ford acquired full access to their R&D.  Should be very reliable.

FWIW:  Turbochargers do wear out.  Expect it.  At about 100,000 miles.  Consider them somewhat of a wear item, like clutches and tires.  They spin at over 100,000 rpm, and even with oil lines to the bearings and water lines to passageways around those bearings, they will eventually need replacing.  Comes with the territory but is relatively inexpensive to do, all things considered.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on June 15, 2018, 05:39:53 pm
Agreed on all counts.  Ford still sells a hell of a lot of normally aspirated 302 V-8's - especially in their truck line for precisely that reason.  With proper care and feeding those engines are damned near bulletproof. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Plebian on June 15, 2018, 08:22:22 pm
My brother has 2 f-150s with the ecoboost v6. One is nearly at 100k and the other is about 50k. They have been working like a charm.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on June 15, 2018, 10:18:26 pm
Do they run them in Oklahoma?  If so, do they use the severe service maintenance schedule?   :hmm
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on June 16, 2018, 03:29:36 am
Good to know.  IIRC wife's truck has about 36,000 miles on it.

With reguard to turbo reliability, my Duramax has about 150,000 miles on it, should I be planning a turbo replacement?  I was figuring on 200,000 before worring about that.  Is the life on Ford tubo's that much shorter? Or is that due to the difference in fuel and engine/turbo rpm?

Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Plebian on June 16, 2018, 08:37:42 am
Good to know.  IIRC wife's truck has about 36,000 miles on it.

With reguard to turbo reliability, my Duramax has about 150,000 miles on it, should I be planning a turbo replacement?  I was figuring on 200,000 before worring about that.  Is the life on Ford tubo's that much shorter? Or is that due to the difference in fuel and engine/turbo rpm?

The Ford turbos are pretty small. So they spend more time at higher RPM. Which is good for doing away with turbo lag, but it is bad for longevity.

None of the Duramax turbos made 200k at work. It could be conditions here, but they just didn't make it. I know that temps are the real killer on turbos so maybe being cooler where you are might be significantly better.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Plebian on June 16, 2018, 08:44:59 am
Do they run them in Oklahoma?  If so, do they use the severe service maintenance schedule?   :hmm

They are my brother and his wife daily drivers. So they do not get worked super hard. He tends to be a baby to his vehicles, and he services earlier than recommended. That could just be him being the grease monkey he is tho.

He lives in far west OK near my parents. So it is a bit warmer and drier than here in the middle where I live.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on June 17, 2018, 01:16:28 am
Just curious.  Here in Phoenix we always run under the severe service schedule because of the heat and the microfine dust.  It's usually in the fine print of your vehicle warranty but if you've lived here for any length of time it becomes obvious why you need to do it that way. 

Fords are big sellers here and the EcoBoost engines seem to do fairly well.  I've heard a few horror stories but no more than with their old 6.0 L diesel engines. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Plebian on June 17, 2018, 04:06:44 pm
Just curious.  Here in Phoenix we always run under the severe service schedule because of the heat and the microfine dust.  It's usually in the fine print of your vehicle warranty but if you've lived here for any length of time it becomes obvious why you need to do it that way. 

Fords are big sellers here and the EcoBoost engines seem to do fairly well.  I've heard a few horror stories but no more than with their old 6.0 L diesel engines.
I think as engines have become more and more sophisticated along with more power produced per liter of displacement. Then when it fails it really fails instead of just limping along for awhile.

In western OK tons of folks run severe dust service plans. Especially true for folks like my family that are on dirt roads. That fine red dust is rough on filters. That is for all engines no matter if on tractors, cars, swathers etc etc.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on June 18, 2018, 12:50:15 am
Agreed.  I have a friend who was a heavy line mechanic for a car/truck dealership here for many years and he tells horror stories about finding enough of the microfine dust here in the bottom of an oil pan to make a passable polishing compound.  Filters almost completely clogged with the stuff.  Deteriorated CV boots full of the stuff.  Bad news all around if you ignore the severe service schedule. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: LowKey on June 18, 2018, 12:14:53 pm
Speaking of micro-fine dust and engines,  anyone here know how those washable/reusable foam air filters deal with that sort of environment?
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on June 18, 2018, 05:25:21 pm
I ran a K&N filter for years on my old Chevy K5 Blazer and liked it fine.  Its a bit of a pain in the a&& when it comes time to clean and re-oil the filtration element but that was the designated hunting/camping truck and it spent considerable time out in the dirt and the filter seemed to do its job.  If I had it to do over again I would pair it with a high snorkel intake to cut down on the amount sucked in when following another vehicle but other than that it was money well spent IMO.  I don't remember exactly how many miles that truck had on it when I sold it but I do remember it was over 100,000 and the heads had never been off it and the mains were original and it still passed the emissions test.  I ran a synthetic blend in it and changed the oil and filter every 3000 miles like clockwork. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on November 26, 2018, 12:25:01 am
I liked the wife's truck so well that I went and bought one for me.  I got the 10 speed auto and get a little bit better mileage the the Wife does.  So far I hate having payments, but love the truck and not having to work on trucks unless I want to.   

Gas is $.20 per gallon cheaper than diesel, and I went from 16 mpg to slightly better than 19mpg.  I was given 30 gallons of Jet A, the Duramax went back to the truck I knew and loved.  The mileage went back to almost 18, and the power was better.  I think I am done with diesel unless I can find a good cheap source of old school #2 diesel.  The newer fuel is absolute crap.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on May 04, 2019, 08:26:25 pm
I have not taken any pics, but today's project was to put a do-it-yourself bed liner in my new truck.  I worked on the prep for the last three days after work, and scuffing the entire bed was an absolute pain in the ass.  I rolled out the Hercaliner this afternoon.  Hoping that it will dry enough so that I can put on the second coat after dinner so that it can have a chance to dry before the rain forecast for tomorrow.

I wanted to use the Raptor spray on liner, but it would not ship to AK and it would require me to rent a shop in order to get the necessary temperatures for it to cure.   
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on May 05, 2019, 12:49:43 pm
Truck still running Ok?   :hmm   How do you like the 10 speed transmission?   
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on May 06, 2019, 10:49:24 pm
I have got 6500 miles on mine, 10 speed is really nice for a slush box auto.  I would still like a 6 speed manual even if I lost a bit of mileage.  But IIRC 8th is 1:1, and both 9th and 10th are overdrives.  I get around 2.5-3 mpg more than the wife's truck with the 6 speed auto, about 46,000 on hers, 20.5 mpg vs 17.5-18 mpg.  We are about 7 miles of highway from town, 2.5 miles from the house to the highway, 7 miles of 55, then about 2.5 miles to town at 45, and then what ever it is to the job.  I usually average about 17 miles each way to work. 

I do generally keep my foot out of what ever I am driving, despite going 5-10 mph over the speed limit.  The 3.5l is a powerhouse.  When I was going from a 7.3 diesel to the 4.9l gas, I missed the power and torque.  My boss's truck has the 5.8L and it feels like a dog in comparison, but most of that is the 4 speed auto and heavier vehicle weight . I really like the power, even if I rarely use it, love the responsiveness, and it rides almost as nice as a Chevy.

I rolled it across the scales at the dump last Friday, three totes of tools 200-250lbs, half a tank of gas approximately 18 gallons, and it said 5800 pounds.  I think that my Duramax scaled out at 1000-1200 lbs more with a similar load.

No problems with either, and she drove hers twice to Fairbanks this winter and we did nothing special for the harsh cold, it was fine.  I am not sure I am sold on the aluminum body, but Ford sure seems to have the bugs worked out of this generation of F-150.  If something were to happen that we needed to replace either one, it would be another F-150 3.5L 10 speed.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on May 07, 2019, 03:55:54 am
 :thumbup1
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on December 30, 2019, 01:06:58 am
I ended up having my truck towed to the stealership on Friday after work.   The drive train is still flawless with 13,800 miles on it over the last 14 months, but I have been fighting with Ford over the fact that the door latches freeze in the open position.  It happened a few times last winter, but it was a warm rainy winter and I did not think much about it.  Warm rainy winter here means that it is 35 and rain one day and 25 the next.  I was talking to the dealership about another minor issue and just casually asked about the door latches freezing and was told that there was a service bulletin for that.  After two visits to the stealership, I was told that they had done all that Ford was allowing them to do and that if I wanted further action I had to deal with ford customer care.  I have now been fighting with them for a month or so.  They don't seem to understand that if you can't close the door, you can't safely drive the vehicle.  I have had to carry a heat gun and an extension cord so that I can thaw the latches whenever I need to and where ever I am.  I have had to thaw doors mainly at home in the mornings, and occasionally after work.  I have been spending 1-2 hours per week working on the truck just so that it is drive able.  Then this Friday after thawing the same door for the second time I finished my errands and swung by the company office to drop off the sub-floor adhesive that I did not want to freeze over the weekend, and when I attempted to close the door I heard a funny noise and looked and saw a spring sticking out of the latch.  After talking to my wife and deciding that we could figure out a way to not have two vehicles for a week or so I decided to call Ford road side assistance and have the truck towed to the dealership to re-enforce the fact that the truck is un-driveable with out working door latches.

So fortunately I had put off the guy who wanted to buy my old 1992 ford.  So I spent yesterday getting it out of the snowbank and running.  Damn I miss my new truck.  I like having a standard and an eight foot bed again, but that 28 year old truck sure is showing it's age.  It rattles, wanders, drips, and shakes.  I tried putting my time sheets above the visor, but they kept shaking loose and falling on the floor. 

I am trying to get Ford to fix my truck 100% right now or buy it back.  I went to the dealership on Thursday and looked at used trucks but would not accept the trade in deal they offered.  I am pissed, but will not take a $8000 loss on a truck that I am happy with except for the one stupid little thing. 

I guess that that is the lesson.  Ford can't keep up with fixes for the problems in their new vehicles.  How hard is it to figure out how to make door latches work on your number one selling product?
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: MTK20 on December 30, 2019, 05:26:59 pm
I'm sorry to hear this. Personally, I really like Ford.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on December 30, 2019, 10:40:51 pm
I'm sorry to hear this. Personally, I really like Ford.

Me too.  I have owned twice as many Fords as any other brand.  Ironically I will most likely buy another Ford to replace the current one if they can't fix it.  I wish I could get a super duty frame, and body with the F-150 power train.  Seriously best of all worlds.

I have had fewer problems with my Chevy's, but I have never owned a new one.  Also I bought one with a serious issue that I knew there was a bulletin on, that saved me $6000.  My buddy missed getting his truck fixed under that bulletin, injectors, and it cost him almost $9000 by the time his mechanic figured out the problem and fixed his truck.

I am back to thinking about building my own truck.  Frame and body would be Ford Super duty crew cab long bed, axles dana 60 front and rear with the Ford suspension.  If I go gas it will be a LS engine probably a 4.8L so I could turbo charge it.  I would like to go I6 love the Chevy and Ford inline 6's, but want more power than they produced.  Don't need crazy power but would like 200-250 horse power with decent torque.  If I go Diesel then Cummins 12 valve but they are hard to find cheap and decent.  So most likely 6.9 turbo or a 7.3 turbo, NOT powerstroke.  Transmission will be a ZF 6 or a ZF5 if I can't find a 6.  One reason I have not gotten rid of my 1992 is that it has an engine, trans, and rear axle for this build.  If I went OBS then I also have dash cluster, pedals, tilt column, and fuel tanks with sending hardware.  Ironically most of the truck will be Ford, and as modern of a Ford as I can get just without all the electronic crap.  I really have not figured out a good way to tow 10,000 lbs, have 2000lbs of payload, and still get 20mpg on the highway empty with out driving a newish vehicle.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on December 31, 2019, 12:32:32 am
Sorry to hear about your truck problems.  I would be really interested to know what the service bulletin said re: how it identified and described the problem and what the authorized fix was.  Was the problem any better after they did the repairs authorized by the bulletin?    :hmm

I imagine that kind of thing is a problem other places besides Alaska and it might be good to hit some of the Ford owner forums to see what, if any, solution(s) others have found to it.   Maybe folks in Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota and Michigan have some way to deal with it that hasn't made its way to your neck of the woods.   People running commercial trucks might also have a few ideas to pass along.    :shrug

I agree that it seems like something Ford should have figured out by now.   :facepalm   
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on December 31, 2019, 02:24:43 am
I am not on nor have read about the issue on any Ford/Vehicle forums.  I have been swamped at work and with plumbing catastrophes at home.

The identifier is latches freezing more than "normal" combined with a complaining customer.  The latches freeze in the open position not closed.  Authorized fix is modified internal channeling and weatherstripping.  Combined with removing latches, drying them, re-greasing and then reinstalling.  According to the service manager at my local dealership this works about 40% of the time in his experience.  After the dealership did the "fix" they called my wife and she was there 1.5 hour later to pick it up, and one of the doors was froze by then.  She went in and told them, so they brought it back in and re-did the "fix".  She then drove 1.5 hours back home.  I got home an hour after she did, and the door that had been "fixed" twice was frozen again.  I have noticed a slight reduction in the frequency of the frozen latches, but it has been cold with low humidity until recently.

Customer fixes work at a slightly higher rate, but require a heated shop/garage as the first "tool".  Basically put the truck in a heated space, open the doors and leave for 2-7 days, a fan is optional but recommended if you are shooting for the shorter time frame.  Then re-lube with aerosol Kroil.

The real problem is that the latches are a semi-sealed unit filled with grease made by the lowest bidder.  This causes the required water shielding/weather proofing to change with the suppliers.  The grease filled part makes drying the moisture out of the mechanism problematic.  Apparently Ford has changed suppliers as the wife's '16 does not have the freeze problem.  And the freezing problem is spotty in the '18.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on December 31, 2019, 03:05:54 am
Got it.  Sounds fairly typical in today's manufacturing environment.  Any chance of retro-fitting an older style latch mechanism less prone to the freezing problem?    :hmm    Trying to work through this one is a bit out my experience - considering we don't deal with much ice and snow and sub freezing weather here in Arizona.   :cool
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: aikorob on December 31, 2019, 09:57:08 am
https://www.fordf150.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=123522 (https://www.fordf150.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=123522)

if you can see this topic..............about halfway down page 3, a guy posted his solution to prevent/redirect the water away from the latch

Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on December 31, 2019, 06:44:04 pm
https://www.fordf150.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=123522 (https://www.fordf150.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=123522)

if you can see this topic..............about halfway down page 3, a guy posted his solution to prevent/redirect the water away from the latch

I knew the problem was ongoing and had existed for several years.  Thanks for the link, I will read through it later.  I have to call the dealership to find out when they think they can get to mine.  I might send the link to  my service manager. ;) 

My wife's '16 does not have the issue, as we bought it used we don't know if the fix was applied or if it came fine from the factory.  The service manager said said that Ford had updated the service bulletin three or four times on what the "fix" is.

Got it.  Sounds fairly typical in today's manufacturing environment.  Any chance of retro-fitting an older style latch mechanism less prone to the freezing problem?    :hmm    Trying to work through this one is a bit out my experience - considering we don't deal with much ice and snow and sub freezing weather here in Arizona.   :cool

My dad offered to take my truck to Tuscon when he and my mom head back there in a couple of weeks.  We both figured the problem would go away down there.  It was 38 and raining when I got up this morning, by noon temp had fallen 15 degrees and it was blowing 25mph and snowing about an inch a hour.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on January 01, 2020, 12:28:30 am
After reading through that thread about the problem(s) that aikorob posted it kind of makes me mad at Ford for not just owning this issue for the folks affected.  You can bet your a$$ets that they knew about this problem from their dealers when it first showed up.   You can't have a hundred or more F series trucks all setting out in the weather on the lot and not get real familiar with this one.    :scrutiny    I neither know nor care what the internal communication situation is at Ford or how they handle a screw up of this magnitude but I have to think if I were running the show those responsible for letting this problem get out of hand and remain that way for two or three years would be looking for a new job.

Ford is not alone in this kind of thing - all the manufacturers act this way in my experience.  They spend hundreds of millions of dollars over the years on product development and testing and that much again on marketing and promotion but none of that is going to buy you any customer loyalty when you don't do the right thing when your product fails in the real world. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: aikorob on January 01, 2020, 06:36:05 am
..................... I neither know nor care what the internal communication situation is at Ford or how they handle a screw up of this magnitude but I have to think if I were running the show those responsible for letting this problem get out of hand and remain that way for two or three years would be looking for a new job. .............

especially their flagship product

but, it's a calculated risk to the bean counters------
out of all the trucks sold; only a small subset will be outside, in freezing conditions, where this problem will show up. Ford sold over 800K   F-series in 2016
if 100K vehicles are affected, and the repair cost is $500=5M     If the cost for an improved design over all 800K trucks is more than $62.50 each; they lose money
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Raptor on January 01, 2020, 09:09:14 am
Unfortunately, this appears to be SOP for Ford. My family had a very early 90s Ford Taurus station wagon that we bought new. Don't recall the exact model year since I was in kindergarten when we got it, so almost certainly a 1991 or 1992 model. The type of engine that was in our wagon turned out to be seriously defective. As in multiple serious recurring issues. Leaky head gaskets was one, and I recall that some senor or valve kept malfunctioning, and the timing belt never stayed in tension either (as a result of of the last one, the car made a sound like fingers on a chalkboard whenever it idled or accelerated).

And Ford being Ford, to the best of my knoweldge they promptly acknowledged the problems and implemented permanent solutions repeatedly refused to admit that there was anything wrong with the engine model whatsoever, and their authorized repairs consisted of similar quick 'n' done patches like with your latches, though they thankfully did fix them under warranty... until the warranty expired. Then owners were screwed. They finally did acknowledge the issue and offer to compensate the owners according to the current market value of their car... in the early 2000 when the cars were so old that they were barely worth anything. My Dad was so disgusted with the car by that point (which seemed to be in the shop on a monthly basis by that point) that he took whatever deal they were offering, put the money towards a Honda minivan, and vowed to never by an American car brand ever again.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on January 01, 2020, 02:02:04 pm
Unfortunately - for all concerned - the "bean counters" have an effect on the whole industry.  The problem(s) we are discussing are not confined to one manufacturer or the manufacturers of any one country.  They span the entire spectrum of the automotive industry.  I won't list anecdotes here but they are a few mouse clicks away for any and all manufacturers if you'd care to look for them.

The cost(s) of fixing an existing problem are considerable but they must be weighed against the cost(s) of people swearing off the brand entirely because of bad experience.  A lot of the problem(s) can be traced to the staggering sums of money necessary for governmental regulatory compliance.  It all comes out of the bottom line and corporate shareholders are not known for their forgiving nature over the long term. This makes the corporation choose between the devil you face today and the one you'll probably face tomorrow.  Without getting too deep into the differences between strategic and tactical thinking as they apply to the auto industry, the companies must juggle a lot of competing priorities. 

The problem is the customer who buys a faulty product is invariably the one left holding the bag - whether its a dealer who is losing customers every day because the manufacturer is playing that game they play or the customer who bought the product from that dealer and is simply done with the whole business and looking to limit the losses and move on. 

I have never had a car or truck or any other piece of machinery that was entirely trouble free over a five year period of ownership.  Some didn't make it to the five month mark.   I have owned American, European and Asian makes - both cars and light trucks.  Heavier equipment has been primarily American and Japanese.  To date, the most reliable makes over the long haul have been Ford, Toyota, Kubota and Subaru.   The best dealers are those that have tried to intervene on behalf of the customer with a problem that was clearly a manufacturer's issue.  Those dealers, in my experience, have been Subaru and Chevrolet dealers with Ford and Toyota a notch or two behind them.   

I finally gave up on Chevrolet as a brand in spite of having a good dealer experience.  They may have gotten better since then but I'm not yet willing to take another chance on them.  Subaru has been a pleasant surprise so far.  Ford is still pretty solid despite a few black eyes over time and Toyota has a pretty solid product but their dealer network can be hit or miss and dealership parts and repairs may well fall into the realm of an abusive relationship.  :facepalm   
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on January 01, 2020, 03:54:32 pm
Bean counters are the death of high quality anything.  But without them we could not afford to buy the product and the market would be so small due to length of product life and initial cost the manufacture would not remain in business.   As I have said, I don't know what percentage of trucks have this problem, but it does not seem to show up until truck has been in service for about 6 months.  People who had problem show up right away bought used trucks.  Every repair place I have ever seen has some sort of inside work space, so problems caused by vehicles being out doors can be hard to "repeat".  My sample size is 2.  I have a failure rate of 50%.  It is huge to me.  I spent around $73,000 on both of these vehicles, again huge to me.  But they have a used Limited or Platinum F150, can't remember which, that they are asking $75,000 for USED. :facepalm

My dealer ship pulled my truck in to the shop last night, pulled the door panels opened the doors and are leaving it that way until the parts come in Thursday.  They expect to have my truck back to me Friday.  They are attempting to do right by me. 

I just looked at the Car Fax for the used F350 I was looking at and saw that it went in to the dealer ship for DOOR LATCH FREEZING ISSUE in October.  Not sure what I think about that.  I am hoping that my truck will be fixed, not sure that I will ever trust it fully again.  It is the best compromise of what I NEED that I could find. 

I would look at a Chevy/GMC if there was a dealership closer, but I do not have the time for a 10 hour round trip to look at a truck I am not sure I would buy.  If there was a Toyota, Nissan, and GM 1/2 ton crewcab long bed 4 wheel drive standard truck I would, but nobody makes such a beast any more.  Gm did, they called it a 1500HD, but it only came with a bigger engine and was a 2 or 3 year oddity.  I can't justify the time and expense to look at the compromises when I like hate Ford.  I get mad at Ford, go to something else, and then come back to Ford as they build the vehicles that come the closest to meeting my needs/wishes, at the quality and price I can almost afford.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on January 01, 2020, 09:51:49 pm
If you went to the medium duty F series ( starting with the F 450 ) would it be easier for you to find the mix of features you need?  I know the commercial market typically requests different equipment than the light duty consumer market that the Raptors and stuff like that are marketed to.  I know they offer PTO and special wiring harnesses and different engines in that line so maybe if you went with a little heavier chassis you might be able to find the manual transmission you're looking for.   :shrug
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on January 02, 2020, 06:40:05 pm
If you went to the medium duty F series ( starting with the F 450 ) would it be easier for you to find the mix of features you need?  I know the commercial market typically requests different equipment than the light duty consumer market that the Raptors and stuff like that are marketed to.  I know they offer PTO and special wiring harnesses and different engines in that line so maybe if you went with a little heavier chassis you might be able to find the manual transmission you're looking for.   :shrug

In Fords you have to go to a F650 or 700 to get to a "medium" duty truck.  Then you get lots of different choices but generally 4x4 is not one of them.  F450, and F550 are basically a F350 dually with lower gears in the differentials and options for longer wheel length.  Transmissions are the same IIRC. Frames are beefed up some but lots of the parts interchange.  Kodiak is the GM medium duty and they use Allison's.  Most of these size trucks are fleet owned and the newer autos are way down on maintenance, so clutches are going fast.   Big thing to watch out for is if you go over 26,000lbs GVRW then you need to have a commercial drivers license in some states.  In AK as long as it is not for hire, you can drive whatever you want. 

I have a 10,000 lb tow capacity, about 2000lbs of payload, and get 19mpg out of my '18 F150.  If it had a 8' bed and a manual it would be ideal, but I get 95% of what I want.  I would lose driveability, mileage, and tow capacity if I had a manual.  3.5 eco boost has 375 horse power, 475 ft lbs of torque, and gets great mileage.  I can't think of another engine that can do that.  Newish 6.7l Ford diesel is 435 horse power and 975 ft lbs of torque in front of a 10 speed auto.  I think it is rated for 35,000 lbs of towing in the F350 dually.

Auto transmission are becoming more common in semi's.  Also I don't want to supply the company with a truck.  And due to the "heavy" duty nature of these trucks the gear ratios are low so the mileage sucks.  I had a 1997 Super Duty which was what Ford called the F450 before it was F450.  Regular cab, 7.3l turbo, 5 speed, with a 8' wide by 12' long flat bed.  It was 2wd with .430 gears which meant that at 55 mph you were turning almost 2500 rpms and that meant about 12 mpg. 

At this point automatics are standard.  I will have to buy or build a classic vehicle if I want to bang my own gears.  Still looking for a classic pick up to build as a farm truck for the wife to drive to the farmers market.  Think I want to go Studebaker for that one.  It will be a summer only truck so 2wd is fine and it will run to town and back with produce to sell only.  I have my Toyota that I want to fix up as my "Toy".  I need to get the front axles fixed so that I can use it as a back up even in the winter.   I would be driving it now, but you can't go over 35 with the hubs locked in.  There is only 197,000 miles on the 22RE.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on January 03, 2020, 01:01:36 am
 :thumbup1  Got it.  And you're right - TANSTAAFL - re: big engines and big gears and fuel mileage. 
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: Mikee5star on January 25, 2020, 05:14:46 pm
So update time.  My wife went up and got my truck from the dealership on Thursday, 1/9.  Dropped her truck off, then we went up Mon 1/13, picked her truck up and I got my truck back.  If you want to appreciate your new vehicle, go drive a 30 year vehicle for three weeks.  So far the issue has not re-occurred.  In the two weeks it has been back the weather has been clear and cold, below 15F on average.  I think the temp has got over 20F 3 times in the last two weeks.  It snowed an inch or so and I let the truck run and melted the snow rather than sweeping it.  No freezing door latches so far.

So that appears to be the fix, at least until we get lots of rain again,  put the truck in a heated shop for about 10 days with the interior door panels removed.  The water redirection and new sealing around the latches seems to work for smaller amounts of precipitation.  We don't usually get larger amounts of winter precipitation unless the temps are between 20F-40F, so I will know more later.

For all my b____in and moaning I continue to be very pleased with my truck.  For the money, under $40,000, I don't think you can find a better do all vehicle. 

All that said, I think that I will look at cargo vans again.  Now that Ford is making the Transit with all wheel drive, there is an option other than the Sprinter for a AWD van with out going to a Quigley conversion van. And maybe Chevrolet will bring back the Express AWD.  But they all start about $45,000.
Title: Re: Wife's new Truck
Post by: coelacanth on January 25, 2020, 09:10:03 pm
Glad things are working out so far.   :thumbup1