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Author Topic: Challenging certain aspects of gun control based on racial discrimination?  (Read 1396 times)

Langenator

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Now, I generally think playing the race card is for losers, but bear with me.

The right to keep and bear and bear arms is an enumerated right.  The right to vote is not - the Constitution only specifies that it can't be denied based on certain specific criteria.

Now, leftist 'voter rights' groups have challenged voter ID laws on the basis that such laws are racially discriminatory (they almost always assume that racial minorities are poor, and couch their challenges this way.)  These challenges have been successful in some federal court circuits.

So why hasn't anyone challenged the ID requirement to buy a gun in those circuits on the same basis, citing their own rulings as precedent?  If the requirement to provide ID to exercise one right is racially discriminatory, then that same requirement should be racially discriminatory for other rights as well.

As the meme man says, change my mind.
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    Kaso

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    Probably because an overwhelming majority of both the voting public and politicians feel that the background check that requires identification is not an undue burden on anyone, nor a major infringement of their second amendment rights.  Not to mention the cost of an ID is a fraction of what even the cheapest firearms cost.

    I would suppose that the vast majority of the public feels the same way about voting, and preventing voter fraud, but leftist politicians want 'everyone' to vote (multiple times, if necessary) because the votes at the lower fringes (racial or economic) are a vital part of their voter pool.

    RMc

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    One could make the same argument using Poll Tax rulings as precedent.
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    RMc

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    Pittman-Robertson act excise taxes that are passed on to consumers when they buy guns and ammunition totaled about $800 million in 2017. This taxing system could be challenged using SCOTUS precedents against excise taxes on wholesale inks and newsprint.

    Another $350 million was raised in 2017 from similar taxes on fishing equipment. However, these taxes do not impact an enumerated civil right.
    Alabama

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