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Author Topic: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!  (Read 26437 times)

PvtPyle

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Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2008, 08:04:08 PM »
Yes Bo, it's the same one I am packing. I just lickd it off and put it away.   :neener
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    Bo Smith

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #26 on: November 17, 2008, 09:49:03 PM »
    Yes Bo, it's the same one I am packing. I just lickd it off and put it away.   :neener

    Again, that's why you're the he-man; and we're just swishy little girls, comparatively.
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    Destiny

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #27 on: January 01, 2009, 06:23:22 PM »
    Having used the Quick Clot a few times... would have to say here in the States.... a +1

    A small pack of some sort of Burn Gel is handy..... for those embarrasing hot barrel incidents.

    A few absorbable sutures if you can find em.... BTDT.

    A few OTC pain killers.... sometimes you do really stupid things while having a Headache.


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    payne87bronco

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #28 on: January 05, 2009, 10:44:16 PM »
    pvt pyle i am new to site and not trying to cause trouble just save a headach. " Nose trumpet. The techincal name is long, so nose trumpet works. They are good if you are still awake and your face is gone...." you never use a nasal airway if there is facal truma, it could go in to the brain and not the airway, a trach would be better for that, but that is just the emt in me talking
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    ridata

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #29 on: January 05, 2009, 11:22:53 PM »
    payne: I thought a nose trumpet was a nasopharyngeal airway (nasal airway)?
    I've never done it myself, but as I understand you do use them when there is facial trauma.
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    Medikman

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #30 on: January 06, 2009, 12:12:52 AM »
    payne: I thought a nose trumpet was a nasopharyngeal airway (nasal airway)?
    I've never done it myself, but as I understand you do use them when there is facial trauma.

    This has actually been a topic of debate for a while now in EMS. There has long been a contraindication for using an NPA on patients with maxilo-facial injuries or basal skull fractures due to the increased amount of damage that the responder can cause, however if you don't provide a patient with a secure airway, what's the point? Try to get a patent airway by other means first, but if that is your only option you would have to weigh the consequences of potentially causing greater damage or loss of life.

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #31 on: January 06, 2009, 10:52:24 AM »
    Oohrah, Chinook Medical has everything you need, and then some:

    http://chinookmed.com/

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    jdamsare4kids

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #32 on: April 12, 2009, 02:38:52 PM »
    Id suggest a small soldering iron..its handy for those rare gunshot wounds under the arm pit or the "taint" area ect. that a tourniquet cant be used on ....just stick it in there burn what ever you can then pack it full of gauze for a quick fix
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    Thernlund

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #33 on: April 12, 2009, 03:03:56 PM »
    Id suggest a small soldering iron..its handy for those rare gunshot wounds under the arm pit or the "taint" area ect. that a tourniquet cant be used on ....just stick it in there burn what ever you can then pack it full of gauze for a quick fix

    Why not throw in a few Cautery Pens?

    http://www.dmesupplygroup.com/high-temp-surgical-cautery-pen-5039.html

    http://www.usmedicalsupplies.com/High-Temp-Surgical-Cautery-Pen.htm

    Don't have to plug them in, and they're designed for what you suggest.


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    Outbreak

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #34 on: April 13, 2009, 12:22:48 AM »
    Id suggest a small soldering iron..its handy for those rare gunshot wounds under the arm pit or the "taint" area ect. that a tourniquet cant be used on ....just stick it in there burn what ever you can then pack it full of gauze for a quick fix

    Dude, if you ever stick a soldering iron into that part of my anatomy, I'll kill you. You know I know where to find you. :neener
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #35 on: June 14, 2009, 07:43:24 PM »
    By the way, if you have a tourniquet in your kit, be sure that you store it already threaded/ made into a loop. It's hard enough trying to put one of those together with one hand under any circumstances, but it is virtually impossible while under extreme stress, and bleeding out, even with two.
    Along those lines, you should always try out kits; go through them, see what's inside, take it out, unravel it, practice bandaging with it, and get used to it before you need it. The middle of a hot zone while people are shooting is not the time to try to figure out how the stuff works, or how to unpack it.
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #36 on: January 03, 2010, 01:29:47 PM »
    Great thread... important topic.  Personally, I have started carrying a small kit with me anytime I am teaching. At the CFS Instructor conference in October, I made it company policy for any instructor and we also added a short segment on proper use of Compression Bandage & tourniquet and the recommended equipment to the CFS Instructor Development course last year.

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #37 on: January 03, 2010, 02:15:14 PM »
    That's a good policy.
    I keep a small trauma kit in my truck.  I just pray I never - ever - have to pull it out.   
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    Bo Smith

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #38 on: January 03, 2010, 04:45:50 PM »
    Education has caused me to upgrade my kit a bit recently. I'll get some updated pics soon.
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    kdogmcg

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #39 on: January 15, 2010, 12:02:49 PM »
    When i saw the thread title, i thought "ive got one of those, it's called a diaper bag".

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #40 on: May 16, 2010, 11:05:00 PM »
    Updated my kit writeup, now with rationales: http://762rifleman.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/blowout-kit-redux/

    Feedback and comments are welcome. Imageshack already lost one of my pics to the Ether, and I have to take two more on needle decompression, but the meat of it is done.
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    RevDisk

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #41 on: May 17, 2010, 12:02:33 AM »
    Updated my kit writeup, now with rationales: http://762rifleman.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/blowout-kit-redux/

    Feedback and comments are welcome. Imageshack already lost one of my pics to the Ether, and I have to take two more on needle decompression, but the meat of it is done.

    Good kit, IHMO. 

    Couple of nitpicks, if even that.  I've never been overly impressed with the Israeli bandages.  But you included Cinch Tights, and they are quite nice.   Why the two different types?

    Also, any specific reason you went with the ratchet strap?  Cost?   Personally, I'm a fan of either the NAR or SOF tourniquets, which I usually source through Rescue Essentials.  (Same as the H&H, Cinch Tights, etc)  Admittedly, they are much more expensive.

    You might want to include a razor.  Either a scalpel blade or something like this.

    Now, some people think I'm crazy, but I ditched one of my bandages and included a travel sized bottle of contact solution (sterile saline with some preservatives), a very small roll of tape and some excellent bandaids.  Yea, if one person was shot than I had compression bandages for, maybe I'd regret it.  But, honestly, I've used those additions significantly more than the compression bandages.  And if you're dealing with a nasty wound site, irrigating it is a friggin blessing it.  Makes it a LOT easier to handle. 

    Also, no alcohol pads for a specific reason?

    Why the chemlight instead of an tiny LED flashlight and a spare battery?
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #42 on: May 17, 2010, 03:53:14 PM »
    Good kit, IHMO. 

    Couple of nitpicks, if even that.  I've never been overly impressed with the Israeli bandages.  But you included Cinch Tights, and they are quite nice.   Why the two different types?

    Also, any specific reason you went with the ratchet strap?  Cost?   Personally, I'm a fan of either the NAR or SOF tourniquets, which I usually source through Rescue Essentials.  (Same as the H&H, Cinch Tights, etc)  Admittedly, they are much more expensive.

    You might want to include a razor.  Either a scalpel blade or something like this.

    Now, some people think I'm crazy, but I ditched one of my bandages and included a travel sized bottle of contact solution (sterile saline with some preservatives), a very small roll of tape and some excellent bandaids.  Yea, if one person was shot than I had compression bandages for, maybe I'd regret it.  But, honestly, I've used those additions significantly more than the compression bandages.  And if you're dealing with a nasty wound site, irrigating it is a friggin blessing it.  Makes it a LOT easier to handle. 

    Also, no alcohol pads for a specific reason?

    Why the chemlight instead of an tiny LED flashlight and a spare battery?

    I'll take your questions in order. I don't have Cinch Tight dressings. I have Cinch Tight compressed gauze. I do want to try some of the Cinch Tight "H" dressings. I just haven't had a large enough order to  get over Chinook's $50 minimum. The IBD is for applying pressure to the wound. The Cinch Tight gauze is packing material, The applications are different.  The ratchet strap tourniquet was at PVTPyle's recommendation. I really want to order a couple of SWAT tourniquets. They seem compact and easy to use. If they pass muster they'll save quite a bit of space and weight. The razor is an interesting thought. I have some in my big medical kit, but don't need one in my BOK, since I am nearly hairless. I will be adding a few scalpels to my big kit (my other person kit. I think it boils down to space and weight. Similarly, I would love to have some saline in there. I just don't know how to swing it right now.

    I have a second boo-boo kit in my pack, full of band-aids, ibuprofen, and all of that jazz. I don't want to have to dig through snivel meds in the event of a life-threatening emergency. 
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    kdogmcg

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #43 on: May 18, 2010, 08:47:38 AM »
    just had a demo of the items we are discussing here. our on staff medic is a big proponent of celox vs. quick clot. apparently, celox can be removed later on with saline. the quick clot requires debriding the flesh. also, the celox applicator http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/05169/s-hemostatics/-CELOX-A-%28Applicator%2C-6-gr%29---------------------

    is perfect for GSWs. you use it just like a tampon. also, for tourniquets, this is awesome, you can do it yourself quick and easy (well, relatively easy, considering the probable circumstances)  http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/05149/s-tourniquets/-SOF-Tactical-Tourniquet------------------------  The rod is anodized aluminum.

    Gunnguy

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #44 on: January 26, 2011, 09:31:55 PM »
    In a scout training seminar we had to put together whatever we think of as medical supplies from household items.

    Popsicle sticks for splinting hands, finger, toes, etc.

    Folded Paper towels and alcohol for sterile wipes.

    Tape, scissors, plastic wraps.

    Feminine Pads for Bandages and Compresses

    Tampons for bullet holes.


     :neener
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

    RevDisk

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #45 on: January 27, 2011, 12:47:09 AM »
    In a scout training seminar we had to put together whatever we think of as medical supplies from household items.

    Popsicle sticks for splinting hands, finger, toes, etc.

    Folded Paper towels and alcohol for sterile wipes.

    Tape, scissors, plastic wraps.

    Feminine Pads for Bandages and Compresses

    Tampons for bullet holes.


     :neener

    Not good unless you have no other options.  If you have no other materials, sure, why not.  I'd caution that it's far wiser to follow the Boy Scout motto and be prepared with proper materials. 


    Paper towels and alcohol - You'd introduce foreign material into the wound.  Paper towels are not sterile, and will have all kinds of lint or whatnot attached.  Plus, you really don't know what else might be in the paper towel.  Might want to be careful what type of alcohol you use.  Maybe not a huge deal, but alcohol wipes are cheap and safer. 

    Plastic wrap - same.  Foreign material, non-sterile, not intended for usage on wounds, etc.

    Feminine pads aren't the most horrible material to use as a make-shift pressure bandage, as they are intended for use on folks.  But they're not intended for direct contact with lacerations and whatnot.  On the plus side, if one is female, it could be dual use so that is a consideration.

    Tampons and bullet holes, very bad idea.  They are not designed for that application.  Not sure who started that meme, but it should be an extremely last resort.  If you have literally nothing else and the alternative is 100% certain death by blood loss, sure, go ahead.  I'd say the same thing if you wanted to shove a pine cone in a wound channel.  You want a Celox-A "injector". 
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #46 on: January 27, 2011, 01:05:54 AM »
    I'll tell you what's stupid...and this falls more in general med than blowout kit, but dealing with heavy bleeding...

    At work we deal with chainsaws, skil saws and the like. Powersaws of various types have a good potential for injury, right (even considering a very careful operator, accidents do happen, and the likelyhood increases as the day goes on due to fatigue, getting used to the task and not paying as much attention, etc)

    So the last time I had to take a first aid class...it was all about boo-boo type injuries...how to put a bandage on, don't remove a stick or object from a wound, how to put a splint on. Basically 20 minutes of info stretched out into one boring 8 hour class. I asked the instructor about how to stop truley heavy bleeding from bad accidents and such, specifically asking him to show the class tournaquit application and how to fashion and apply one.

    Fat liar sat there and told us "Oh, we don't teach how to use a tournaquiet, you don't need to know how, it will cause limb loss, etc". Yeah, if you don't remove the tourniquet after several hours, nevermind that we'd be at the hospital in 20 minutes but that won't matter if somebody bleeds out within the first two minutes. So essentially, we didn't actually learn any real lifesaving skills in that class.
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #47 on: January 28, 2011, 08:18:15 AM »
    Not good unless you have no other options.  If you have no other materials, sure, why not.  I'd caution that it's far wiser to follow the Boy Scout motto and be prepared with proper materials. 


    Paper towels and alcohol - You'd introduce foreign material into the wound.  Paper towels are not sterile, and will have all kinds of lint or whatnot attached.  Plus, you really don't know what else might be in the paper towel.  Might want to be careful what type of alcohol you use.  Maybe not a huge deal, but alcohol wipes are cheap and safer. 

    Plastic wrap - same.  Foreign material, non-sterile, not intended for usage on wounds, etc.

    Feminine pads aren't the most horrible material to use as a make-shift pressure bandage, as they are intended for use on folks.  But they're not intended for direct contact with lacerations and whatnot.  On the plus side, if one is female, it could be dual use so that is a consideration.

    Tampons and bullet holes, very bad idea.  They are not designed for that application.  Not sure who started that meme, but it should be an extremely last resort.  If you have literally nothing else and the alternative is 100% certain death by blood loss, sure, go ahead.  I'd say the same thing if you wanted to shove a pine cone in a wound channel.  You want a Celox-A "injector". 
    Thank you for your informative criticism. I appreciate the feed back.
    However...

    This was a last resort class to teach what you have on hand is what you have on hand. I was trying for some levity with the tampons and bulletholes, but guess it missed the mark.

    As far as materials go. This was a certified and licensed Nurse Practitioner that taught us these things. Similar to Self Aid and Buddy Care/ Chem Training in the military.

    Paper Towels and "Rubbing" alcohol (Whiskey, Vodka, NippyNip, etc...) Paper Towels contain a small amount of chemical bleaching agent and the alcohol would sterilize the Paper towel anyway. This was for small wound care not huge gashes and severed limbs.

    Saran Wrap (Plastic Wrap) is an excellent way to stop small sucking wounds or to bind other bandages to wounds. The plastic wrap has a very small amount of anti-microbial added to keep it clean for food grade use. As long as it isn't obviously contaminated with fluids or dipped is shlitz before you apply it the plastic wrap should be good to use.

    Feminine pads HAVE to be sterile and clean enough for women to use them. They are meant for use in blood loss, remember? And they make a great pad or pressure application when used with other materials. Very absorbent and plentiful. May not be the best choice, but when all else fails they beat a dirty bare hand.

    Tampons for bullet holes. Ok, this was for laughs I admit. But when you have no celox-A injectors or other options it could be useful when used with a pad and some plastic wrap to stop bleeding out. Again, all last option choices.

    For those serious about it. I have two field surgical kits, telfa pads, sterile bandages, cold compress packs, and turniquet materials. I am in the process of updating the carry bag to a larger, medical response bag.  The Celox-A injectors is an excellent option as also others mention in this thread. But I do have a few questions. What about turn around for shelf life? How long is too long for some of these items? Pads, bandages, wraps, etc. Injectors should have a date on them, but what about the rest of it?

    Thank you in advance for your replies.

     :hide

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    huey148

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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #48 on: January 28, 2011, 11:46:52 AM »
    Quick and dirty thoughts for BOK usage in today age...assuming you are not in a TEOTWAWKI scenario...

    Extremities (arms, Legs)- tourniquet, plain and simple, clamp down as proximally close to the wound as you can.  Most 911 services today will have you in a trauma center within 60 minutes...

    Torso, head. "other" - Celox sponges and Israeli bandages/field bandages/maxi pads or whatever...

    Sucking chest wound - while saran wrap will work it is not ideal..too flimsy in some applications...need to have a thicker piece of plastic, I have a zip lock bag with a piece of cardboard in it with a couple of feet of 100mph tape in it...use the bag ILO the saran wrap and the tape to keep it in place (remember to leave a corner untaped!)

    and always have a charged cell phone ready to call 911
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    Re: You know what a blow out kit is? You should!
    « Reply #49 on: February 02, 2011, 08:55:03 PM »
    Thank you for your informative criticism. I appreciate the feed back.
    However...

    This was a last resort class to teach what you have on hand is what you have on hand. I was trying for some levity with the tampons and bulletholes, but guess it missed the mark.

    As far as materials go. This was a certified and licensed Nurse Practitioner that taught us these things. Similar to Self Aid and Buddy Care/ Chem Training in the military.

    Paper Towels and "Rubbing" alcohol (Whiskey, Vodka, NippyNip, etc...) Paper Towels contain a small amount of chemical bleaching agent and the alcohol would sterilize the Paper towel anyway. This was for small wound care not huge gashes and severed limbs.

    Saran Wrap (Plastic Wrap) is an excellent way to stop small sucking wounds or to bind other bandages to wounds. The plastic wrap has a very small amount of anti-microbial added to keep it clean for food grade use. As long as it isn't obviously contaminated with fluids or dipped is shlitz before you apply it the plastic wrap should be good to use.

    Feminine pads HAVE to be sterile and clean enough for women to use them. They are meant for use in blood loss, remember? And they make a great pad or pressure application when used with other materials. Very absorbent and plentiful. May not be the best choice, but when all else fails they beat a dirty bare hand.

    Tampons for bullet holes. Ok, this was for laughs I admit. But when you have no celox-A injectors or other options it could be useful when used with a pad and some plastic wrap to stop bleeding out. Again, all last option choices.

    For those serious about it. I have two field surgical kits, telfa pads, sterile bandages, cold compress packs, and turniquet materials. I am in the process of updating the carry bag to a larger, medical response bag.  The Celox-A injectors is an excellent option as also others mention in this thread. But I do have a few questions. What about turn around for shelf life? How long is too long for some of these items? Pads, bandages, wraps, etc. Injectors should have a date on them, but what about the rest of it?

    Thank you in advance for your replies.

     :hide



    Whoops, sorry if I wasn't specific.  Apologies!  Not saying you're wrong whatsoever.  When you have to, you have to.  Improvise however you can.  I'm (personally, not saying anyone does or should do the same) just really really careful when rattling off improvised medical stuff.  Some people don't read or listen too well and take last ditch "Well, if I'm screwed anyways" advice as "I should do this under normal circumstances and/or rely on it inappropriately" advice. 

    How are the tefla pads?  I've been mucking with 3M Tegaderm and very impressed with it thus far.  I replaced all of my old bandaids with Nexcare versions.

    For anyone that hasn't mucked with it, have a glance at http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/SH/SkinHealth/brands/tegaderm/

    Basically, imagine if Gore-Tex and Saran Wrap had a baby named "Transparent Film Dressing", that was sterile, semi-permeable and adhesive backed. 
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