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Author Topic: Making pool water drinkable?  (Read 10545 times)

JD

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Making pool water drinkable?
« on: July 10, 2009, 03:28:42 PM »
 I'm just about to start research on the topic, but wanted to see if anyone had information and/or experience.
Can swimming pool water be made safe for drinking? Off the top of my head I thought about using a solar still, combined with a hand held filter system and possibly making use of water treatment tablets (Iodine based, Chlorine Dioxide, not sure).
But having a working solar still might not be possible and it takes a lot more time. Plus, I have no idea if it could work. Evaporation would probably leave behind the chemicals I treat my pool with. That stuff is pretty harsh and it might eat away at the walls of the still. I might not even need to add a solar still in this equation. In addition, could treated pool water destroy the filter in a hand held unit? There's all of that and a billion other things running around in my head on this one.

 


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Irwin

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2009, 03:40:52 PM »
I would just buy some jerry cans and fill them with water, for one god knows what goes in your pool and maybe some of that wouldnt get filtered and thus cause problems for you. Two if its for shtf then treating that amount of water would take to much time and effort, who knows you may only get half the water back? If I was you I would buy a crate or 2 of water once a month or when there is good deals on it and rotate your stock pile.

JD

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2009, 03:56:55 PM »
I would just buy some jerry cans and fill them with water, for one god knows what goes in your pool and maybe some of that wouldnt get filtered and thus cause problems for you. Two if its for shtf then treating that amount of water would take to much time and effort, who knows you may only get half the water back? If I was you I would buy a crate or 2 of water once a month or when there is good deals on it and rotate your stock pile.

Oh I should have mentioned... I already have a constant supply of bottled water that I use, then rotate my stock. On top of that, I have a few 5 gallon collapsible containers I use when camping. But I figured since I have a swimming pool and if things got bad, why not purify the pool water if possible? But then again, it could turn out to be a "diminishing returns" effort.

Irwin

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2009, 04:02:02 PM »
Well its a good idea in theory if you are not buging out, but Im not sure idd drink it considering how much chemicals are put in it though saying that if you go down to the public swimming pool and drink some you may feel a little sick but your fine after wards.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2009, 04:38:04 PM »
In a SHTF scenario you are going to be looking at pools that have been left untreated for some time.  Outdoor pools get really funky really fast.  The sunlight burns out the pool chemicals in a hurry and leaves it just water... Water that catches everything that falls into it and stagnates it into a nice stew of pollens, bugs, seeds, ash, leaves, evergreen needles, molds and fungus, debris of all sorts like trash and bird droppings. 
As a source of drinking water - I'd rather drink out of a toilet tank. 
But if you must.
I'd filter it, then boil it.
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JD

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2009, 05:49:38 PM »
 Ok, filter then boil. That sounds good. I forgot about the most of the chemicals burning off in the sun, thanks George.
My pool water isn't "drinking clean", but I have one of those Florida home Lanai's. My pool and the entire area is screened/caged in, so it still gets dirty. But not like a pool without one, man those can get bad. It helps so much with cleaning and keeping bugs out. Plus, as part of the pool filter system there's a do-hickey I place chlorine tablets into. But that will mean nothing if there's no electricity. I'd have to do it quick if that happens...
 Hmmmm, I need to shop around for a good filter/purification system.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2009, 08:00:21 PM »
Set up a system that you'd use for other "grey" or "black" sources of water, and feed that from the pool.  It won't taste nice, but you have several hundred gallons at least, so it's useful to look at.

If all else fails, you can raise catfish in it after the chemicals come out, and use it for a source of food. O0
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scottja

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2009, 03:08:39 AM »
One of the problems, in addition to all the others that have already been stated, is that pool water has a very high concentration of dissolved minerals.
The sun evaporates a certain amount or water every day and we keep adding more water.  The minerals keep building up in the pool.
No amount of filtering can remove the minerals.  Distilling can produce pure water, leaving the minerals in the evaporation pan.
In a pinch, you can filter and boil the water, but you most likely will get diarrhea from the extremely hard water.
Don't boil it too long because you are just driving off the good water, and even further concentrating the minerals.

strangelittleman

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2009, 12:02:41 PM »
Yes, you should boil then filter, because boiling can raise the nitrate levels and other mineral levels in the water and can cause problems in people with cardiac problems, chronically ill, such as; type 1 diabetics, those with kidney disease, gout, ibs, chronic kidney stones most other auto-immune diseases, etc., high nitrate levels can also cause a problem for children under the age of 5.
Of course this will only become a problem after prolonged intake,( of say 5-15 days, depending on the individual and their medical condition/age) of the water w/ the raised mineral levels for the above mentioned individuals.
So boil it to kill off the micro bios, then filter it to take out a good percentage of the nitrates and other hard minerals that will build up in the systems of the above mentioned.
This also good advice for those that have occasion to take prolonged stays in 3rd world countries.  
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 02:36:03 PM by strangelittleman »
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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2009, 09:12:38 PM »

My 2 cents worth on water.

Water is the most important thing you can store. You should use 55 gallon barrels to store water in your garage or on your property that have been treated with bleach, or one of the many other water purification products. Smaller storage containers may be necessary depending on where you live. If using bleach, use unscented only, and three tablespoons will treat 55 gallons of water for long term storage. If using another product, simply follow the manufacturer's directions. The barrels you use must be food grade. Never use a container which previously held a non-food grade product, as no amount of cleaning will make it safe for water. You will need a minimum of 1 gallon of water per person, per day. Remember, you can live up to 30 days without food, but only 3 to 4 days without water, and in most cases, after a disaster, the water will be off. Your stored water should be elevated at least 3" above the ground to allow for air circulation, to prevent contamination by Radon Gas (which can occur in as little as 1 years time). It's important to note that even after treating your stored water, it is still advisable to rotate it. Water should remain fresh for 3 to 5 years, but a good rule-of-thumb, is to rotate it once a year.
   
Important additions to your water storage plan:

•Several smaller containers (2 to 5-gallons in size). These are for drawing water off the drums for use around the house, and you may need them in the event of an evacuation.
•A barrel style siphon, for ease of drawing water from your barrels.
•Water filter (a good one). In the event of an extended emergency, you will run out of stored water, and any water which does not come from your stored reserves, should definitely be run through a professional carbon/ceramic type filter. Most of the bigger manufacturers of "hiking" water filters, also make larger capacity units, but many of the smaller "hiking" size units are capable of filtering fairly large quantities of water too. Do an internet search or check with local outdoor stores for an assortment of companies that make fine water filters (Katadyn and Berkley are among the best, and on average are capable of filtering upwards of 45,000 gallons of water, which is about 3 residential size swimming pools). On an important side note, never run dirty or murky water through your water filter, as this will shorten its life span. A coffee filter (or in a pinch, even a paper towel) is an excellent way to filter "visible" impurities from dirty or murky water. If you're in a bind, you can always boil water. However, this is not advisable, except as a last resort. Boiling water will kill most waterborne pathogens, but will not remove toxins that might be present in the water. However, if this is your only option, the water should be brought to a rolling boil for at least two to three minutes.

I hope this helps a little...

strangelittleman

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2009, 09:17:34 PM »
Fantasic post DMGNUT!! Very thoroughly explained and well articulated!
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DMGNUT

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2009, 10:06:14 PM »
Thanks StrangeLM, every once in a while, even a blind dog finds a bone.  :cool

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2009, 08:01:47 PM »
Thanks StrangeLM, every once in a while, even a blind dog finds a bone.  :cool

Agree with previous poster - really good little article DMGNUT.
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seanp

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2009, 08:03:59 PM »
As far as the pool water is concerned:

Shock Chlorinate it if possible and it has been standing for a while.  Give it a couple of more days in the sun, filter, and then boil.  But I would not drink any standing water if there was a source of running water nearby.
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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2009, 02:30:24 AM »
Depends on what chemicals you're using to treat your pool. Many folks think it's just chlorine, but there's sooooo much more. I was a licensed Pool/Spa Operator in highschool and college while I was lifeguarding in the summers. Basically, that means I was given the go-ahead from the Health Department to run public pools.

Most private pools use some sort of Sodium Hypochlorite tablets because it's easy. Commercial operations tend to use liquid chlorine on a pump system, which is more accurate and easier to adjust. Our legal levels were between 5-10ppm of chlorine in the water. Way above safe drinking levels, at least in any quantity.

Also included were muriatic acid (aka hyrdrochloric acid), soda ash, for adjusting pH, and a dozen others, all with different uses and scary MSDS sheets, and used in varying amounts.

Many heated pools use bromine in lieu of chlorine because it holds up to the heat better. Chlorine doesn't like heat or sunlight. It evaporates pretty quickly.

I'd say pool water is a total no-no for drinking water.
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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2009, 03:10:29 AM »
Wow, lots of information to take in. Thanks everyone!

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2009, 07:23:19 PM »
thought on pools....

most pools I am familiar with have covers.  Kept covered, you greatly reduce the amount of biological material that gets into the pool. It's really tree leaves and such truck that provide enough organic material for the pool to 'swamp up.  The best cover, possibly supplimented with a secondary cover of tarp and duct tape should substantially extend the life of  your pool water at it's standard level of drinkability...and that is fine.

but of course it won't last forever that way.  Drink the pool water first, bottled water second.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2009, 09:15:14 PM »
I've been meaning to post this for a while... its about 4 pages long if printed out, so feel free to skip it. But its got some real good information. Enjoy.


Water Purification vs. Filtration

First, lets detail in layman's terms, the difference between purification and filtration, and then examine when either or both might be appropriate or perhaps even necessary.

Biologically contaminated water, is water that contains microorganisms, such as viruses, bacteria, cryptosporidium, etc. These microorganisms will lead to intestinal disorders and infections (and untreated, even death). This water requires purification. Purification kills all the bad stuff living in your water, and is usually accomplished via a chemical process. The following products are common examples of chemicals, which when used properly, will purify your water; sodium hypochlorite, iodine, purification tablets, chlorine dioxide, etc. Heat and UV light can also be used to purify water. Keep in mind that purification will not actually remove anything from your water, like pesticides, unwanted chemicals, heavy metals, etc. It only kills living organisms. It is important to note, that one must be mindful in choosing a purification method, as a variety of extenuating circumstances will determine the effectiveness of each purification method used, when pitted against different organisms and under different conditions.

Toxic water contains chemical contamination from pesticides, mine tailings, and so on. For the sake of this discussion, we will also include dirty, murky or otherwise unusable water, in the toxic water category. This water must be filtered to be safe to drink. Filtration removes these unwanted ingredients from your water, so long as what you're filtering out, is larger than the pores of your filter. Think of a coffee filter, and how it keeps the coffee grounds out of coffee. The same principal applies here, only to do the job you need done, a much finer filter is required... so think in terms of microns. To put this into perspective, 600 microns will fit in the period at the end of this sentence. Most things from both biologically contaminated and toxic water, can be removed via filtration... but not everything. Thus the need for purification. Just as purification will kill microorganisms, but will not remove toxins, and thus the need for filtration.  

Water Purification
Dipping your head into a cold mountain stream and taking a long refreshing drink, is an experience that has basically vanished from the wilderness areas of America. With the increased use of the wilderness, there has also been an increase in the amount of bacteriological and chemical contamination, of backcountry water supplies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that 90 percent of the world's water is contaminated in some way. There are a variety of microscopic organisms that can contaminate water supplies and cause potentially serious, even fatal illnesses, among wilderness travelers. The primary danger in the backcountry from these infections, is fluid loss due to diarrhea and vomiting, which can lead to hypovolemic shock and possibly death (study up on fluid electrolyte replacement, and shock, to learn more about treating shock). But our goal here, is to avoid this all together.
In order to drink the water you find, you should be prepared to treat it. There are numerous methods for water purification, described below in order of effectiveness. Remember however, that infections can also be spread through poor personal hygiene, something that purifying your water won't prevent. So wash your hands... often.

Boiling
Boiling is the most certain way of killing all microorganisms. According to the Wilderness Medical Society, water temperatures above 160°F (70°C) kills all pathogens within 30 minutes and above 185°F (85°C) within a few minutes. So in the time it takes for the water to reach the boiling point of 212°F (100°C) from 160° F (70°C), all pathogens will be killed, even at higher altitudes. To be extra safe, let the water boil rapidly for one minute (especially at higher altitudes, since water boils at a lower temperature there).

Chemical Purification
There are two common types of chemical treatment; those using iodine, and those using chlorine (for another option, see the MIOX, by MSR). There are a variety of products on the market, so follow the directions on the container. Be advised that many of the tablets have an expiration date and become ineffective after that point. Also, once the container has been opened, the tablets must be used within a certain period of time. When in doubt, buy a new container. Remember that chemical purification methods may only be partially effective, depending on the temperature of the water you are treating.

General Chemical Treatment Procedures
•   The effectiveness of all chemical treatment of water is related to the temperature, pH level, and clarity of the water. Cloudy water often requires higher concentrations of chemical to disinfect.
•   If the water is cloudy or filled with large particles, strain it, using a cloth, before treatment. Large particles, may have been purified only, "on the outside."
•   Add the chemical to the water and swish it around to aid in dissolving. Splash some of the water (with the chemical already in it) onto the lid and the threads of the water bottle, so that all areas are treated.
•   The water should sit for at least 30 minutes after adding the chemical, to allow purification to occur. If using tablets, let the water sit for 30 minutes after the tablet (or tablets) have dissolved.
•   The colder the water, the less effective the chemical is as a purifying agent. Research has shown that at 50°F (10°C), only 90 percent of Giardia cysts were inactivated after 30 minutes of exposure. If the water temperature is below 40°F (4°C), double the treatment time before drinking. It is best if water is at least 60°F (16°C) before treating. Consider placing the water in the sun to warm it up before treatment.
•   Chemically treated water can be made to taste better by pouring it back and forth between containers, after it has been adequately treated. Other methods include adding a pinch of salt per quart or adding flavorings (lemonade mix, Kool-Aid, etc.), once again, after the chemical treatment is completed.

Iodine Treatment
Iodine is light sensitive and must always be stored in a dark bottle. It works best if the water is over 68°F (21°C). Iodine has been shown to be more effect than chlorine-based treatments in inactivating Giardia cysts. Be aware that some people are allergic to iodine and cannot use it as a form of water purification. Persons with thyroid problems, who are on lithum, women over fifty, and pregnant women, should consult their physician prior to using iodine for purification. Also, some people who are allergic to shellfish are also allergic to iodine. If someone cannot use iodine, use either a chlorine-based product, or a non-iodine based filter, such as the PUR Hiker Microfilter, MSR WaterWorks, or the Katadyn Water Filter. Generally, the procedure for iodine is as follows:
•   Liquid 2% Tincture of Iodine Add 5 drops per quart when the water is clear. Add 10 drops per quart when the water is cloudy.
•   Polar Pure Iodine Crystals Fill the Polar Pure bottle with water and shake. The solution will be ready for use in one hour. Add the number of capfuls (per quart of water treated) listed on the bottle, based on the temperature of the iodine solution. The particle trap prevents crystals from getting into the water being treated. It is important to note that you are using the iodine solution to treat the water, not the iodine crystals. The concentration of iodine in a crystal is poisonous and can burn skin  tissue and eyes. Let the treated water stand for 30 minutes before drinking. In order to destroy Giardia cysts, the drinking water must be at least 68°F (20°C). The water can be warmed in the sun before treating or hot water can be added. Refill the treatment bottle after use, so that more solution will be ready one hour later. Crystals in the bottle make enough solution to treat about 2,000 quarts. Discard the bottle when it's empty.
•   Potable Aqua This is an iodine tablet product. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for use.

Chlorine Treatment
Chlorine can be used for persons with iodine allergies or similar restrictions. Remember that water temperature, sediment level, and contact time, are all elements in killing microorganisms in water. Halazone is an example of a chlorine tablet product. To use, follow the manufacturer's instructions.

Tricks of the Trail
Always have at least one backup method for water purification in case one fails. This can be any combination of methods. Be the cautious person, and always have two backup methods: water filter and 2% tincture of iodine, or Polar Pure iodine crystals. You can always boil the water. If boiling is your backup method, make sure you have enough fuel.
Adding vitamin C (about 50 milligrams) to iodized water, completely eliminates any taste or color of iodine. You must wait until the iodine has purified the water before adding the vitamin C. The vitamin C in drink mixes like Tang™ has the same effect.

Water Filtration
There are a number of devices on the market that filter out microorganisms and toxins. A water filter pumps water through a microscopic filter that is rated for certain-sized organisms and particles. The standard size rating is in microns. Depending on the micron rating of the filter, smaller organisms (like viruses) can pass through. Be cautious when selecting a filter. You should know what potential organisms you need to treat for, by studying the area you will be in. You don't want to go to an area where a virus like Hepatitis A is present in the water (a problem in many developing countries) with a filter that will handle only a larger organism like Giardia.

Common microorganisms and the filter size needed
Organism   Examples   General Size   Filter Type   Particle Size Rating
Protozoa   Giardia, Cryptosporidium   5 microns or larger   Water filter   1.0-4.0 microns
Bacteria   Cholera, E. Coli, Salmonella   0.2-0.5 microns   Microfilter   0.2-1.0 microns
Viruses   Hepatitis A, Rotavirus, Norwalk virus   0.004 microns   Water purifier   to 0.004 microns

Two basic types of filters
•   Membrane Filters, which use thin sheets with precisely sized pores that prevent objects larger than the pore size from passing through. Pro: Relatively easy to clean. Con: Clog more quickly than depth filters. Example: PUR-Hiker.
•   Depth Filters, which use thick porous materials such as carbon or ceramic to trap particles as water flows through the material. Pro: Can be partially cleaned by backwashing. Activated carbon filters also remove a range of organic chemicals and heavy metals. Con: Rough treatment can crack the filter, rendering it useless. Examples: MSR WaterWorks II, Katadyn.

Note: Remember, there is a difference between a water filter and a water purifier. Filters do not filter out viruses, but there are some water purifiers, like the PUR Scout, that pass the water through both a filter and an iodine compound, that kills any smaller organisms that have passed through the filter. These purifiers kill all microorganisms down to 0.004 microns; however, this filter should not be used by people who are allergic to iodine.

Common Practices for Using a Water Filter
•   Filter the cleanest water you can find. Dirty water or water with large suspended particles will clog your filter more quickly.
•   Prefilter the water through either a prefilter on the pump, or strain it (through a bandanna, coffee filter, etc).
•   If you must filter dirty water, let it stand overnight for the particles to settle out.

Tricks of the Trail
Some water filters come as sealed cartridges, making it impossible to inspect the actual filter cartridge. If the filter takes a serious fall, it could crack internally. If the filter inside cracks, unfiltered water can flow through the crack. Treat your filter with care, and if it takes a significant impact, throw it away. Also, remember the intake hose from a water filter, has been submerged in unfiltered water. Treat this hose as "contaminated" and store it in a separate plastic bag.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2009, 02:35:11 PM »
Thats a lot of good info DMG!  Thanks.  Reminds me that I need to add more drink mix to my BOB.
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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #19 on: August 27, 2009, 03:23:18 AM »
Quote
Dipping your head into a cold mountain stream and taking a long refreshing drink, is an experience that has basically vanished from the wilderness areas of America. With the increased use of the wilderness, there has also been an increase in the amount of bacteriological and chemical contamination, of backcountry water supplies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that 90 percent of the world's water is contaminated in some way. There are a variety of microscopic organisms that can contaminate water supplies and cause potentially serious, even fatal illnesses, among wilderness travelers. The primary danger in the backcountry from these infections, is fluid loss due to diarrhea and vomiting, which can lead to hypovolemic shock and possibly death (study up on fluid electrolyte replacement, and shock, to learn more about treating shock). But our goal here, is to avoid this all together.
In order to drink the water you find, you should be prepared to treat it. There are numerous methods for water purification, described below in order of effectiveness. Remember however, that infections can also be spread through poor personal hygiene, something that purifying your water won't prevent. So wash your hands... often.


I disagree with this.

For starters, 'modern' contamination such as agricultural and lawn chemical washoff, or heavy metals from mining, these in water will not give you diarrhea and vomiting.  It may give you cancer or destroy your kidneys.  However, it is really more of a problem with someone who regularly drinks the same contaminated water again and again, thus over the year they will have a large intake of the toxic materials.

For most impurities that result in vomitting and 'the runs' you are talking biological.  Guess what...deer have been crapping in the stream for millenia.  I suppose there might be issues where some camper upstream is not properly disposing of his waste but that really has very little impact.  The issue is lack of exposure.  100 years ago people drank well water, or gathered rainwater from a cistern, etc etc.  People were exposed to microbes etc and the body got used to dealing with them.  Now everyone drinks chloronated, filtered water, so people haven't developed the same tolerances.  Think about some guy living on a space station and NEVER encountering the common cold, flu, fever, chicken pox, etc or any of the many illnesses we are exposed to.  Now, he comes down and exposes himself to them all at once. He has such a weak immune system, that even if he was totally healthy, he might just die.  But us who are constantly challenging our immune systems, they are stronger, and take on the common cold with relative ease.

maybe a better example is Mexican Water.  People in the USA who travel to Mexico (or othe third world countries) are told to 'not drink the water' and even told to avoid ice in their drinks because they will get 'the runs' or possibly even vomit.   But the Mexicans at the local village who drink the water every day, they aren't constantly suffereing from diarrhea...because their bodies are used to it.

Take that same mexican from that same little village, he could drink that mountain stream water just fine.  Take some guy from 1850 from his log cabin, throw him in a time machine and bring him to mexico, he'd be able to drink the water in Tuijuana straight from the faucet without any issues.

But we can't because our bodies haven't been exposed to those bugs.  (although, I say 'speak for youself' I grew up drinking well water, I am much less likely to get a bad reaction to the standard biological contaminats)

As far as parasites carried in animal feces, really, that was ALWAYs a risk...and generally that is something that will make you sick a week or two later, not the next day.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2011, 07:17:04 AM »
I am the President of Lazy Day Pools out of Atlanta and my company has been retrofitting swimming pools to provide drinkable pool water for the past five years. The system does not use salt or chlorine and instead uses copper ionization mixed with titanium oxygen generation and ionized glass filtration to render the water crystal clear and drinkable (NSF-61 Certified Drinkable). We are now offering the same system we put on our swimming pools to purify drinking water in whole house systems to every tap. We have had such great success with the drinkable pool water over the past five years that we no longer offer salt or chlorine systems anymore on new pools we build. The average cost to retro an existing pool with these systems is around $3K. I thought your question was interesting because with all that is going on in the world today it is nice to know that as long as I have electric power (generator, etc.) I will continue to have 30,000 gallons of drinkable water in my backyard. I think we aren't the only ones who think about this stuff because sales are though the roof! Hope this information helped.

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2011, 10:54:55 AM »
Here is an example of a water recovery system.  The tanks, clean plastic 55 Gal. drums, are used to settle out sediment.  I used three here, but I've seen as many as six in a system.  The water is then piped to a cistern and stored for use, or it can be run through a filtration system, then distilled, then stored.  I've seen them used mostly to recover rain water from gutters, but brackish pool water could be pumped in as well.

If you are handy, the whole system (including filtration and distillery) can be built for under $1000.
ArizonaStupidity cannot be cured with money, or through education or by legislation.  Stupidity is not a sin, the victim can't help being stupid.  But stupidity is the only universal capital crime; the sentence is death, there is no appeal, and execution is carried out automatically and without pity.  RAH

Mamba1-0

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2011, 02:34:10 PM »
You might want to check out the "British Berkefeld" (Big Berkey) water filters and purifiers.
They filter out metals, chemicals (including chlorine), bacteria and most viruses. (They'll even filter food coloring out of water and leave the minerals.)
People even use them to filter the chemicals from municipal water to make it taste better.

This is one place that has them:
http://www.jamesfilter.com/

They aren't the cheapest - but they're top of the line for water purification.

added; You can get 10-20 gallons per day of pure water depending on the size you get and the number of filters (2 or 4).
Missouri

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2011, 08:12:15 PM »

George is right.  Short answer is "don't".  Moving water is always preferable, as stagnant water breeds bad things quickly.

You'll need to screen it (to prevent the filter from being junked up with crud in a hurry), filter it (with activated charcoal or whatever), then chemically and/or thermally treat it.  Distilling it would also be a good idea.  It will still be unpleasant unless you have quality equipment. 

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Re: Making pool water drinkable?
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2011, 09:50:36 PM »
Don't forgwet the water that is already in your house pipes and hot water heaters. You can put that water into jugs, containers, and whatnot and store it indefinately for use if WTSHTF or something else happens.
But filters and treatments are a must.
A bottle of pure Iodine, packs of PUR 'Dark Blue' three stage filters, and a good hand pump will keep you good for a while.
Don't foget to harness the rain water as well for various needs.
Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'


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