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Author Topic: Choosing an MBR  (Read 3547 times)

MTK20

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Re: Choosing an MBR
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2017, 09:48:54 PM »
The only other options I can think of are somewhat exotic.   You can get .308 VEPR's pretty easily, but magazine availability is a problem.  You need to either get it converted to take something more common,  or deal with high-priced VEPR magazines.

You can find BM-59s,  but those are essentially just a more expensive M1A.   

Then you get into the really crazy collectible stuff like a Sig AMT,  .308 Valmet or Galil, etc.

Aren't there some pretty affordable Galil variants out there?
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    mattitude

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #26 on: March 30, 2017, 10:08:19 PM »
    I have a RFB Hunter (24" barrel) and I haven't had a single issue with it. I've also shot a good number of deer & hogs with it, longest shot being a hair over 350yds.  You get all the benefits of the  FA but at a much shorter OAL and is lighter as well.  Future parts availability is kinda moot as history has shown (Obama election for example) that even the most common parts can disappear overnight. IMO you can do a lot worse but not much better for the money. I  picked mine up for 1100.00 OTD.
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    booksmart

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #27 on: March 30, 2017, 10:47:07 PM »
    I would go for an AR-10, because I already have an AR-15, and would stick with the same manual of arms. The only issue with forgetting which one I'm shooting would be reaching for the wrong mag, and that would sort itself out right quickly...

    m1911a1lover

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #28 on: March 30, 2017, 11:00:56 PM »
    I voted for the M1A. I have carried the M14 in service, and I owned an FN FAL para,  I found that I liked the M1A better and alot more fun to shoot in my opinion...
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    Raptor

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #29 on: March 30, 2017, 11:07:13 PM »
    I'm a die-hard, unrepentant FALophile, so I gotta vote for the FAL. An 18" Paratrooper model is pretty high up on my Want List.

    That said, my understanding is that DSA's quality control can be spotty, and their customer service is terrible. I've read lots of horror stories on FAL Files, and I believe our own FMJ had a poor experience with them. And I personally am leery of buying used guns, especially parts builds where I'm not sure of the gun's provenance.

    So my heart says the FAL, my vote says the FAL, but that practical part of my brain says either a PTR-91 or an AR-10, choice being dependent on personal preference and/or budget.
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    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #30 on: March 30, 2017, 11:52:45 PM »
    Back to the OP, why do you want one?  If it is for .30 cal fun, why not go AK?  Or https://www.hmgunworks.com/product/hmg-sturmgewehr-standard-length-223/ in 7.62X39.  I am strongly considering going with that caliber in one for me.
    I already have an AK in x39, as well as two 5.56 assault-type rifles.  I want something in a larger caliber, specifically .308/7.62.

    From what I've seen, Kaso does tend to like German firearm technology from that era. He might love that.
    :hmm I like Mausers...  I wouldn't mind a Luger...  What else?  I am really not a WW2 firearm fanboi.  Mainly just the WW1 armament that was so good that it got carried over.
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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #31 on: March 31, 2017, 12:07:42 AM »
    I already have an AK in x39, as well as two 5.56 assault-type rifles.  I want something in a larger caliber, specifically .308/7.62.

    All good reasons. 

    If I was not wanting interchangeability in caliber, I would lean more towards M1A.  Though I have a soft spot in my heart for the PTR. 

    I am unlikely to ever see a RFB but I want to try one.

    My problem is that I go in a gun shop and the answer is yes I will take one of each.  The MAJOR problem is paying for that desire.
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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #32 on: March 31, 2017, 01:14:17 AM »
    Since I am weak, I will probably end up not keeping my 2017 resolution to bring home no new guns.  So much the better, as far as I am concerned.  :cool

    I already broke mine.  Someone dangled a 17HMR lever action in front of me.  Now I wont feel too bad when I buy a K6. :neener
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    ksuguy

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #33 on: March 31, 2017, 08:23:47 AM »
    Aren't there some pretty affordable Galil variants out there?

    I think Century offers one,  but it's only the 5.56 version.   I don't think anybody is making the 7.62x51 versions at the moment.   
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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #34 on: March 31, 2017, 10:54:38 AM »
    Now that everyone else has had a chance to state a preference, here is my take.  I don't need a .308 MBR, but I don't really 'need' an AR either.  This is just something that should be in my collection for the sake of completeness, and for the off chance that I ever go 'close in' hog hunting.  In order of likelihood that I will acquire:

    Springfield M1A* - Ergonomics and aesthetics are big, as is the fact that it is a proven design in current production.  I should have mentioned in the OP, scoping this rifle was never really a consideration.

    AR-10 - Definitely the most aftermarket support and parts availability, and the greatest range of quality and price. (cheap garbage, to top of the line)  The logical side of my brain says 'AR-10' every time.  But...  I don't know...  If I go this route, it will be with a fixed stock model.

    Keltec RFB - Laugh away.  There is something to be said for a bullpup rifle.  I would definitely need to handle one first, as ergonomics will make or break any of these choices for me.  In contrast to the AR-10, my logical brain says 'definitely not,' but I really do want an RFB.

    DSA FAL - Moved down to last place.  I was initially optimistic, but now with DSA's quality and reputation being called into question...  I have enough problem guns as it is now.



    *Yes, Springfield.  I have no plans to spend a huge pile of cash on a rifle that will not be a main SHTF weapon.  While I welcome H2OMan's input, (no one knows M14s better) he takes these rifles to a level that I never will.

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #35 on: March 31, 2017, 11:23:26 AM »
    If you want an M14 clone, and you do not plan to mount a traditional scope over the receiver you would be wise to consider the standard 22" barrel. The 22" provides you with the longest sight radius, and lets you take full advantage of the awesome iron sights. You can always install a scout hand guard that lets you co-witness said iron sights through an Aimpoint T1 or similar RDS mounted low.

    Raptor

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #36 on: March 31, 2017, 12:22:32 PM »
    I think Century offers one,  but it's only the 5.56 version.   I don't think anybody is making the 7.62x51 versions at the moment.
    IWI just started importing the Galil ACE in .308.  MSRP is something like $2k, however.

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #37 on: March 31, 2017, 02:19:45 PM »
    The SCAR would also be a fantastic option.  Very light weight, very accurate, very reliable, and remarkably light recoil for a .308... very controllable, even when firing rapidly.   
    It's got a higher price point, and mags are stupid expensive... But the system you invest in is probably the best in the world - Period.  And it allows you to switch parts and have a 5.56mm system.
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    ksuguy

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #38 on: March 31, 2017, 07:46:39 PM »
    IWI just started importing the Galil ACE in .308.  MSRP is something like $2k, however.

    Oh yeah, I forgot about those.   I wasn't a fan of them since they changed far too much.   Instead of going with the classic Galil style,  they decided to make a lot of it out of polymer and completely changed the furniture to some hideous crap that looks like low end AR furniture from the Tapco catalog.    Between that and the $2k price tag,  not interested.



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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #39 on: March 31, 2017, 09:38:25 PM »
    If you don't expect to fight a war with it, don't expect to scope it, and might hunt with it- consider a Garand.
    Basically, it is an eight shot M1A.     Hmm- maybe not- I just looked- things are getting very dry at the CMP.  They do have a special field grade left, new barrel, new stock, and a repark receiver with some pitting. $830.
     For a while you could get them in 7.62x51 also.

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #40 on: April 01, 2017, 10:23:09 PM »
    If you don't expect to fight a war with it, don't expect to scope it, and might hunt with it- consider a Garand.
    Basically, it is an eight shot M1A.     Hmm- maybe not- I just looked- things are getting very dry at the CMP.  They do have a special field grade left, new barrel, new stock, and a repark receiver with some pitting. $830.
     For a while you could get them in 7.62x51 also.
    I'm saving like a mad man to try and get one before they're gone...
    I have about half. and I worked 9 hours overtime today so thats about a quarter of it.. plus a membership with a CMP recognized club.

    and don't be afraid of the FAL. they're good. just try and get an Imbel or such.
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    Grant

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #41 on: April 02, 2017, 10:18:51 AM »
       I'm going to say that I think an AR10 will leave you restless and unsatisfied  ;) We had this discussion and there's a reason I've been through two AR10's.  They are perfectly functional and suitable, however they are like an AR15....they have no "soul".

      As far as a FAL......*shrugs* like I said, I avoided a DSA and got a good kit build for the same price.    No reason to go DSA in my mind.    Not with good builders and fixers like gunplumber and the like around.
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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #42 on: April 02, 2017, 01:08:40 PM »
    I have about half. and I worked 9 hours overtime today so thats about a quarter of it.. plus a membership with a CMP recognized club.

    Cheapest club is probably the Garand Collector's Association, that's only $25 a year and you get a quarterly magazine.   Or your state level gun rights organization.  For example, the Kansas State Rifle Association also counts. 

    So far I've got 6 of the Garands, and 1 carbine.  Wish I would have bought another carbine or two back in 2009, but I was just more interested in rifles at the time.   I wish the CMP had cut down on the scalpers a little sooner,  there were way too many guys going in and buying their 10 rifle a year allotment (plus another 10 for their wife), and then flipping them at gun shows.   I think the current system where they limit you to one in-store purchase at a time is better.

    I'd still like to get an International Harvester so I could have one from all the manufacturers,  but those have a pretty steep collector premium on them.   

    Kansas

    Grant

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #43 on: April 02, 2017, 01:29:59 PM »
      I joined the GCA to be applicable.  Worked out good.   Got two Garands for myself.  One for me, one for if I ever have a kid.  They'll be expensive by then.  Woulda liked to have gotten a couple spares but I waited until the price got to $730 apiece so I didn't have the cash.

      I SHOULD have done it years ago when good Garands were $530 shipped.   

       
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    ksuguy

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #44 on: April 02, 2017, 02:11:21 PM »
    I got their special grade back in 2009.  It was a little pricey, but it was like a brand new gun.   I also got an H&R Service grade and an IBM carbine at the same time.    I picked up two more field grades when I was driving by the South store a year later.  Then I bought one of their beat up Winchesters without the stock and rear sight.  I took one of those Italian .308 kits that Sarco was selling and had it rebarreled and refinished.

    Finally, got the last service grade when I went to Dragoncon last fall.   It was one of the ones that had the new replacement CMP stock on it, and the finish was very good.  The barrel was also in really good shape.   

    If I do another one,  I might look for another one that is really beat up and have it rebarreled to .270 and refinished like I did with the Winchester.   
    Kansas

    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #45 on: April 02, 2017, 08:47:25 PM »
    I went to a gun show today, and was able to handle some guns and talk to a gunsmith.  In short, I handled a FAL, and I don't think that is the route I want to go. 

    The more I think about it, I might just have an AR-10 built with a 20" pencilweight barrel, and a CavArms A1 stock.  The question would be whether I want to get it free floated with flip sights, or go for a retro A2 look... :hmm
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    Raptor

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #46 on: April 02, 2017, 09:27:40 PM »
    I looked into AR-10 barrels a while back, and IIRC nobody makes a pencilweight .308 AR-10 Barrel. That said, Columbia River Arms (aka/formerly known as Black Hole Weaponry) offers a light-contour AR-10 barrel, and there is an outfit that does carbon-fiber AR-10 barrels (actually carbon-fiber wrap over a thin steel blank). Can't remember the name, and IIRC they're pretty expensive, but they (supposedly) give all the strength and rigidity of a heavy barrel but without the weight.

    As for configuration, I'd recommend flip sights, especially if you're planning on running an optic.
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    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #47 on: April 03, 2017, 12:11:29 AM »
    A 'light' profile would be acceptable, I think. 

    And if I am going with a flat top and a scope, then I am going to be tempted go with a short, 16" barrel and mount a can. :hmm
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    LowKey

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #48 on: April 03, 2017, 05:24:11 AM »
    A 'light' profile would be acceptable, I think. 

    And if I am going with a flat top and a scope, then I am going to be tempted go with a short, 16" barrel and mount a can. :hmm
    That sounds like a very good set up.
    Almost ideal in fact.

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #49 on: April 03, 2017, 01:19:40 PM »
    I owned an AR10 with a 16" pencil barrel, it wasn't very rigid, and I imagine a 20" version
    would generate quite a bit of barrel whip. I ended up selling it to fund another 18" M14 build.

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