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Author Topic: Choosing an MBR  (Read 3163 times)

Kaso

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Choosing an MBR
« on: March 29, 2017, 10:34:46 PM »
Since I am weak, I will probably end up not keeping my 2017 resolution to bring home no new guns.  So much the better, as far as I am concerned.  :cool

I have been batting the idea around, and I do feel that I should have an MBR in my arsenal.  Of the above six options, which 18" 7.62 battle rifle would you choose? 

Of the five listed, I am open to any except the PTR.  I am not interested in those, but I left the option up for the sake of completeness.  If that is your preference, say so anyway.  I am not the only one who will reference this thread in the time to come.

Thanks!
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Here's to a great four years!

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    Grant

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #1 on: March 29, 2017, 10:59:48 PM »
       I voted DSA FAL because, it's a classic design, lots of history, and is still a solid design to use over 50 years from introduction.   I like the left side charging handle, they balance well, shoot well and are reliable.

      ALL of the above in the list would be a good choice.    However FAL is the direction I went  ;)

      I'll say DSA isn't quite up to the high standard they used to be, hang around the falfiles and pick up a quality build from a known smith and pay the same price for a gun worth half again as much as a DSA>
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    ksuguy

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #2 on: March 29, 2017, 11:02:15 PM »
    I've got all of them with the exception of the Keltec.  Well and the PTR, but I think a CETME is close enough. :)   I'd avoid the Keltec strictly due to the rarity.  You can't even find the things, and good luck finding replacement parts if it breaks 10 years from now.

    AR-10 probably has the widest variety of available accessories.   Used to be that they were rare,  but now AR's are all over the place.  You can really customize it up however you want.  Optics mounting is the easiest of the three if you get a flat top. 

    If you had asked this question 10-15 years ago, the FAL would have won hands down due to magazine and parts availability.  That's not the case anymore.  They are still around, but there aren't piles of surplus parts all over the place, and DSA is the only major manufacturer of new ones.    That being said, DSA makes very nice rifle and they offer all sorts of accessories and customization options.  Plus, I think they look the coolest out of the three.   Optics mounting is easy, but you will need to buy a railed dust cover.

    M1A's are good if you shoot better with a more traditional stock.   The downside is that they are a little more expensive,  and optics mounting is probably the hardest of the three.   

    You can find magazines for any of them for less than $20 if you hunt around.    This is one area that the PTR (or CETME) really has an advantage in since G3 magazines are still super cheap.   

    You are going to spend about the same amount of money for the basic rifle on all three of them,  it's the accessories that are going to determine price difference.   


    Kansas

    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #3 on: March 29, 2017, 11:09:29 PM »
      I'll say DSA isn't quite up to the high standard they used to be, ...
    Is that across the board, or specific to their budget line?

    I guess I am asking if the main company has changed, or that now they offer the Voyager series that everyone picks over the high end models, and so now 'DSA' means 'Voyager?"
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 11:33:05 PM »
    I chose the AR 10.  Mostly because the platform is pretty adaptable, parts are fairly plentiful and a caliber swap is considerably easier on them than most anything else.  And, I can get Gundoc to build one for me.   :cool
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    MTK20

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #5 on: March 30, 2017, 12:47:11 AM »
    Any of the above are good, but it was a toss up between fal and M1a, due to styling. Fal won my vote.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
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    LowKey

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #6 on: March 30, 2017, 01:17:21 AM »
    .308 AR.
    Ergonomics, weight, and accuracy.
    I've also built and worked on hundreds of ARs so familiarity with maintenance and repair on this system is another factor.

    H2O MAN

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #7 on: March 30, 2017, 08:23:02 AM »
    I'll recommend the M14 type, but not a new Springfield M1A. LRB, SEI, Bula, etc... these shops make fine M14 clones using higher quality parts than current M1As. An older M1A that was assembled with USGI parts is also a good choice. You are not married to the standard stock, and old school problems mounting optics because there are modern alternatives... the lightweight Blackfeather RS imported from Canada is hands down the best modernized chassis stock / optics mounting system available. The adaptable Blackfeather RS lets you use pistol grips or Mossberg 500 butt stocks, and there are several optic mounting solutions.

    Know that in the world of M14s, nothing of quality comes cheap - prepare to spend some money.

    This is my current Blackfeather set up, two rifles - one chassis.
    They are robust, reliable, accurate, and require little maintenance.



    With a pistol grip.


    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #8 on: March 30, 2017, 08:34:51 AM »
    I see someone voted 'Something Else' in the poll...  Which is fine...  But I would really like to know what they had in mind.  What other options would you consider?
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    sarge712

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #9 on: March 30, 2017, 08:43:07 AM »
    I voted AR10 but I also have a M1A Scout/Squad that I love. An M1A, as noted by H20Man, is a money pit but even without an optic it's a tack driver. IMO the M1 Garand/M1A sights are the best precision irons evar.
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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #10 on: March 30, 2017, 08:45:40 AM »
    I see someone voted 'Something Else' in the poll...  Which is fine...  But I would really like to know what they had in mind.  What other options would you consider?


    I voted 'Something Else' because the M1A is not your only option when it comes to M14 clones.

    sarge712's Scout has an 18" barrel, and it's been my experience that the 18" Bush/Scout/MK14 length barrels are the best non-standard length barrels. They are available in standard & medium heavy weight profiles, I'm sure there is a heavy 18" out there - but why?

    GeorgeHill

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #11 on: March 30, 2017, 10:05:49 AM »
    Right now, I'd take an M1A.   I'd get the SOCOM 16 version, and put a wood stock on it.
    One of the reasons for this choice, is not just the aesthetics... but the M1A's action is fantastically reliable.  And Springfield has a lifetime warranty on it.   
    Then there is the asthetics... Classic good looks.  Yes, you can make it look like a weapon system from Aliens... but I appreciate the simple rugged handsomeness of an oiled wood stock.
    And nothing Buttstrokes better than lumber...
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    sqlbullet

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #12 on: March 30, 2017, 10:42:29 AM »
    AR-10.



    Tinker toy of rifles.  And prices on these have really dropped, especially if you build.  Easily re-chambered if desired.  And if you are willing to spend M1A money on your build you can make scout rifle weight.



    This one is in 358 Win with a 16" barrel.  But an 18" barrel with a pencil profile would probably weigh a big less.
    Utah

    GeorgeHill

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #13 on: March 30, 2017, 11:03:31 AM »
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    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #14 on: March 30, 2017, 11:19:12 AM »

    Pretty, and I agree about M14s that look like Aliens props, but I would want a synthetic stock for stability.  OD Green, if a Springfield.
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    MTK20

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #15 on: March 30, 2017, 11:42:20 AM »
    I wasn't expecting a wooden stock and Socom to go so well together.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #16 on: March 30, 2017, 12:42:29 PM »
    Wood stocks feel great and they can be pretty, but they are also highly susceptible to changes in the weather. Your accuracy changes as the wood expands and contracts. GI synthetic stocks resist changes in the weather, but they are also pretty heavy. With the exception of the E2, neither of the vintage / retro wood & synthetic stocks are easily scoped. Modern Aluminum chassis stocks can be lighter than wood & synthetic, they are impervious to changing weather conditions, and they can make adding optics as easy as with an AR10.

     

    Kaso

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #17 on: March 30, 2017, 01:56:57 PM »
    Wood stocks feel great and they can be pretty, but they are also highly susceptible to changes in the weather. Your accuracy changes as the wood expands and contracts.
    This is my reasoning against wood.  That, and it dents too easily.  Synthetic will gouge, but only with significantly more effort than wood will.
    Donald J Trump, by the Grace of God: 45th president of the United States.
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    RetroGrouch

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #18 on: March 30, 2017, 06:35:34 PM »
    I voted other.  If I were going to get one, I'd go with a FN SCAR.  Of the ones listed that I've actually shot, that was the easiest to shoot, lightest, lowest felt recoil.  Also most expensive.


    If price were a concern, I'd get a bolt action and practice getting shots off quickly.
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    zayerpaul

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #19 on: March 30, 2017, 07:01:42 PM »

    Man alive, that just looks right. There may be newer, more efficient and economical options, but that picture just silences all of the arguments in my head anyway. You can't argue with style like that.   

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    Mikee5star

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #20 on: March 30, 2017, 07:09:48 PM »
    I voted AR-10.  That is because I already have a hi-cap .308, well kinda, in the form of my Savage 99.  9+1 is sorta hi-cap. 

    I have a burning urge to play with some of the semi-auto platform large calibers specifically in .458 and .338 calibers. 

    If I was serious about it I need to sell a couple of the poodle shooters to fund the lower build.  I don't see any need for a larger cost toy rifle, unless I can hunt with it.  165gr .30 just don't do it around here unless it is really moving.  I do have a fondness for large bullets poking along.

    Back to the OP, why do you want one?  If it is for .30 cal fun, why not go AK?  Or https://www.hmgunworks.com/product/hmg-sturmgewehr-standard-length-223/ in 7.62X39.  I am strongly considering going with that caliber in one for me.
    Alaska

    MTK20

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #21 on: March 30, 2017, 07:54:46 PM »
    I voted AR-10.  That is because I already have a hi-cap .308, well kinda, in the form of my Savage 99.  9+1 is sorta hi-cap. 

    I have a burning urge to play with some of the semi-auto platform large calibers specifically in .458 and .338 calibers. 

    If I was serious about it I need to sell a couple of the poodle shooters to fund the lower build.  I don't see any need for a larger cost toy rifle, unless I can hunt with it.  165gr .30 just don't do it around here unless it is really moving.  I do have a fondness for large bullets poking along.

    Back to the OP, why do you want one?  If it is for .30 cal fun, why not go AK?  Or https://www.hmgunworks.com/product/hmg-sturmgewehr-standard-length-223/ in 7.62X39.  I am strongly considering going with that caliber in one for me.

    I wasn't aware that this existed, thank you!

    From what I've seen, Kaso does tend to like German firearm technology from that era. He might love that.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    H2O MAN

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #22 on: March 30, 2017, 08:31:19 PM »

    Penguin

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #23 on: March 30, 2017, 08:56:18 PM »
    I voted for the FAL. Out of the list I like the FAL and the M1a. Both are great though I prefer full length barrels. In an 18" barrel I would get a Para FAL because of the folding stock.

    On the other hand the AR10 is the easiest to scope which sure is something to consider in a 308. With a 308 I feel the real advantage is range and a scope sure helps to take advantage of it. I just don't like the AR platform rifles though I have never shot one in 308.

    The KSG just doesn't feel right to me and availability is spoty at best.

    Whe we are on this topic did deseret tec ever come out with that semi auto bullpup they were working on?
    Doobie Doobie Doo...

    ksuguy

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    Re: Choosing an MBR
    « Reply #24 on: March 30, 2017, 09:20:58 PM »
    The only other options I can think of are somewhat exotic.   You can get .308 VEPR's pretty easily, but magazine availability is a problem.  You need to either get it converted to take something more common,  or deal with high-priced VEPR magazines.

    You can find BM-59s,  but those are essentially just a more expensive M1A.   

    Then you get into the really crazy collectible stuff like a Sig AMT,  .308 Valmet or Galil, etc.   

    Kansas

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