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Author Topic: Sharpening FAQ  (Read 9036 times)

alone

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Sharpening FAQ
« on: November 10, 2008, 08:15:23 PM »
 For those that have not seen this.

Sharpening FAQ

Author:  Joe Talmadge

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.knives/browse_thread/thread/140b7e91fa7663f3?hl=en&ie=UTF-8


Related is :

Steel Guide
From A.G. Russell

http://www.agrussell.com/Steel_Guide/a/73/



-alone



« Last Edit: November 10, 2008, 08:20:50 PM by alone »
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    VT Hunter

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #1 on: November 10, 2008, 08:48:42 PM »
    Hey thanks a lot for posting the FAQ.  That info. will really help me when I sharpen my knife.  I recently bought an Arkansas stone and sharpen my knife all the time and that gave me some great tips.
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    Coronach

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 03:10:41 AM »
    Here's another good one, that references part of the one listed above:

    http://forums.egullet.com/index.php?showtopic=26036
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    m1ashooter

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #3 on: February 21, 2011, 01:15:22 PM »
    For some good sharpening instruction visitwww.allaboutpocketknives.com] [url=http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com]www.allaboutpocketknives.com [/url]
    I have found directions for freehand sharpening as well as mechical methods. I have always had better than average results using a Lansky system and am a fair hand at freehand sharpening with arkansas stones. Japanese waterstones give an outstanding edge but tend to be pricey. ;D

    Eiht

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    Re: Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #4 on: August 10, 2011, 01:59:05 AM »
    I second the Lansky. If you take your time and pay attention you will work to a mirror edge that is sharper than any store bought razor blade. Not to mention once you turn your edge into say a 30° it's super easy to tune up going forward.

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    mwcoleburn

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #5 on: August 10, 2011, 10:32:22 AM »
    I sharpen as part of my business, I use the Razor Sharp system, I get a much better, more durable edge then when I was using stones. There are some great systems out there but I can go from dull to shave with in about 5 minutes, and you get a pretty polished edge.
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    Deathrider1579

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #6 on: August 11, 2011, 04:14:19 PM »
    I sharpen as part of my business, I use the Razor Sharp system, I get a much better, more durable edge then when I was using stones. There are some great systems out there but I can go from dull to shave with in about 5 minutes, and you get a pretty polished edge.

    Which Razor Sharp system do you use? I've been told "The razor sharp system is the best" But there are about 20 of them on their website and no one is ever specific.
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    mwcoleburn

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #7 on: August 11, 2011, 05:28:33 PM »

    http://grizzly.com/products/G5937

    The only downside is the 24hr wait between regritting the wheel. Other than that I love it, very forgiving and I've put edges to shave with on a good 50 knives. Usually get 10-20 depending on how bad they are between regritting. If i start sharpening more than I'm doing now I'll get a second set of wheels to eliminate the downtime.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #8 on: August 25, 2011, 11:47:18 PM »
    On a number of my knives I've gone to a convex edge and have been pretty happy with the results.  Also edges are usually easier to touch up than a typical hollow ground edge which is a plus when you're in the field.  Does the Razor Edge system you use give you a flat or slightly hollow ground bevel?
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
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    mwcoleburn

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #9 on: August 26, 2011, 02:03:56 AM »
    being as you are not sharpening against a flat surface it does get a bit concave with the angle in relation  to the wheel and the position on the wheel determining how much. Ive been very happy with the results but I do plan on getting a stone system for some speciality knives (kerimbit style knives as a PITA)
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #10 on: August 28, 2011, 04:18:20 PM »
    Yup - variable radius curves and and bevel angles that vary from blade tip to choil can give you fits.
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

    Lokidude

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #11 on: August 30, 2011, 08:18:50 PM »
    The Lansky is your friend.  I learned on Arkansas stones, and can still put on a scary edge with them, but the Lansky is quick, effective, and very very consistent.
    Utah

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #12 on: August 31, 2011, 07:33:34 PM »
    As I've mentioned before, I prefer a hand tool like a Dremel or a Foredom with a mandrel set for adalox disks.  You can sharpen just about any blade configuration with them once you learn to do your angles by hand.  Use a coarse disc and then buff with Fabuluster.  You'll have an edge that can shave hair and yet cut coarser material like cardboard aggressively.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #13 on: September 02, 2011, 03:30:47 PM »
    I agree.  There is a "sweet spot" for most edges that is just short of the mirror polish found on samurai blades.  An aggressive edge is your friend more times than not, especially in the kitchen, the shop and the game fields.  Blades designed to be applied with force ( like the aforementioned samurai blades, axes, chisels and the like ) can benefit from the mirror polish but most knife blades are better left with a grabby edge that begins the cut with the first hint of movement.
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

    IMSU

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #14 on: October 29, 2011, 08:37:57 PM »
    By the by, if you've got an Asian market close by (one of the chain ones or a big standalone) you can find Japanese water stones pretty cheaply, in I believe the mid-teens range still, but it might have gone up slightly since I last checked. I've always liked my knives wicked sharp and use the stones to get them that way, but this Razor system looks good for doing a big batch of them!
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    Storyteller

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #15 on: October 31, 2011, 11:46:34 PM »
    Recently I made this comment on another subject but will do it again. I had the chance to spend a beery afternoon with my buddy Ken Onion. I mentioned I was getting a "Work Sharp" system. He could not speak highly enough of the system. Now, having used it for several  months, I can totally agree with him. He used one to keep knives sharpened while skinning many bears at a PVA retreat in Alaska. I just use it at home. But it works. Completely. And is entirley made in the US, Oregon to be exact. :coffee
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Sharpening FAQ
    « Reply #16 on: November 01, 2011, 01:27:32 AM »
    You are about the third or fourth person I've heard speak highly of that gadget.  I may have to check it out. :hmm
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

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