Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.

Author Topic: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)  (Read 2487 times)

Grant

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 7843

  • Offline
     You may skip the rambling and go to the big bold "A question" if you like

Okay let me first off say.......I'm an up and coming knife whore..... :facepalm   I'm horrible at sharpening, I am getting better, I'm not outright mangling blades and doing TONS of research, videos and reading to try and get better at it.    I don't USE "big" knives.  My old US-made Schrade 770 muskrat skinner does 99% of my knifework. 

But I LOVE......knives.....big knives, small knives, knives of every type :facepalm   I really don't even have a use but I'm in love if it has a handle and a piece of metal even remotely pointy, stabby or stickery.

  Thus far I have limited myself because of.....lack of actuall usefulness but the recent trip to Smokey Mountain Knife Works reignited that.   At the moment I have:

   BudK Kukri.   Actually a good knife for $20, I could use it in lieu of an axe.
   OKC Air Force Survival Knife on walmart closeout for $25.
   Schrade 770 Muskrat Skinner.   Does 99% of the everyday work.  Love the design I bought 6 US-made ones after trying several of the POS Chinese versions they made.

    Several cheap folders for just general use because I got em for 99 cents apiece, they were factory sharp and I could toss em when I dulled them up.   Also because it was easy to clip on a pocket and pull out when needed.

      During the recent trip to SMKW.......
  I got a Schrade SCH one of their many green and gray box line, standard Tanto, normally around $40 that was $24 on sale.
    Schrade 1520 skinner knife on sale for $14.95.  Average price, but picked one up.    A friend is using one and they must have improved their Chinese steel from what their 770's were using about 10 years ago, it doesn't dull as quickly and seem good quality.

   
   To sum it all up......I have two main points.

  #1.  I bit the bullet and got a Cold Steel 1917 Bowie.   I wanted a "nice" "dress" knife, something smaller than my kukris but bigger than a standard belt knife.   It'll be arriving in about a week.

  A QUESTION
#2.   How do "knife people" actually use their knives?     

My pocket knife works for 99% of my stuff.   

For self-defence, seatbelts,etc. , I carry a somewhat generic nice "clip" knife that I can flip open.   

I also place my kukris in my "large self-defence" class.  if for some reason aliens attack and firearms don't function on their personal shields.
 
   my OKC Air Force knife is good for a "woods" knife or survival knife, as will the large Schrade Tanto type.......

 But......HOW do you use one?   In camping and woodsbumming it happens I......really haven't come across a need for a knife that I haven't ended up using my pocket knife or a compact folding saw.    For small game my pocket knife works better.   For branches,etc. a compact folding saw works best.     

  Outside of stabbing a bear in the face (which an axe would work better) I really haven't been able to find a niche where I can use these large mid-size blades I love.....

 HELP me justify my addiction  :cool   

  In my fervor I'm wanting a myriad of axes, spears, warhammers, knives, short swords and a 1917 Cold Steel Cutlass......

  I think it's because I can get a lot of cool knives for $40-$70 apiece whereas guns run for 4-8 times that  :cool
Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

WeTheArmed.com

  • Advertisement
  • ***

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #1 on: February 24, 2017, 10:11:15 PM »
    Uh, oh. First it's twenty dollar knives, and the next thing you know you've got two dozen hundred dollar knives and are looking at two hundred dollar midtechs. Then suddenly you're into three and four hundred dollar midtechs and are gazing longingly at fullhouse customs.

    Ask me how I know.

    As far as justifying big knives for use, get into bushcrafting and knife combatives. That should do you for a few years or so. You'll learn how to do some cool things with knives, and a pocket knife just won't cut it. Har, har. There are a solid ton of bushcrafting, primitive living skills, and knife fighting channels on Youtube.

    It looks like you've got a few beginner's knives, but non of them are what I'd call hard use blades. Once you've gotten a few nice full tangs and try out some bushcraft skills, it could very well start a nice addiction. One of the reasons I've gotten into knives so much in the last few years is because it's a cheap hobby compared to guns and you can actually use them anywhere, not just a range. Plus, it leads to spending a lot more time outdoors, which is never a bad thing.

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #2 on: February 24, 2017, 10:20:42 PM »
    Justify the addiction...

    Pictures usually help. This is the next step up from where you are.  >:D











    Grant

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 7843

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #3 on: February 24, 2017, 10:30:43 PM »
      True.   Most of my knife experience has come from skinning, coyotes, deer, cows, elk,etc.   so most of my blades are more suited to that.  (shoulda added that a Schrade 60 folder is also one of my most-used blades).

       

     
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    MTK20

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5340
    • Mind of a philosopher, mouth of a sailor.

    • Online
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #4 on: February 24, 2017, 10:37:14 PM »
    I found a use for mine. In fact, I used my Ontario RTAK 2 so well in camping that I noodles it through some Texas oak when batoning (like I've done a thousand times before), and uh.... She didn't unnoodle when she came out the other side.

    I've never really talked about it before, but I've got a knife addiction as well, although I transitioned to buying handguns and even shooting them sometimes  :-[ .

    CRKT premonition (was my edc, until they discontinued it. Now it's a collectible).

    Cold Steel brand
    AK-47 (personal defense tool, worn everyday)

    Heavy and kukri machete (camping)

    Bushman bowie (amazing hard use camp knife for like 20 bucks)


    Glock
    Field knife and survival knife (both for cheap hard use camp knives, splitting wood and fire craft).


    SOG
    Field pup II (reserved as an LBE knife, on my TAG plate carrier beside my US Palm AK mag carrier)

    Snarl (my seldom worn, but favourite fixed blade/personal defense/ neck knife. It's the one that got me to reconsider wharnecliff blades).

    Mini Vietnam tomahawk ("yard tool" and camp companion)


    Ontario
    RTAK II (fire craft, basically just batonning/chopping blade)

    Ontario 1 (personal defense tool, the first serious folding knife I owned).


    Mora
    Clipper (wonderful do everything knife, but be careful, just like the Glock knives when you wake up in the morning when camping you might find a little rust on it).


    Spyderco
    Tenacious, limited edition blue scale handle (just for collector value).

    Victorinox
    Farmer (my edc knife and constant companion).

    I also have a leatherman juice and squirt.

    I have some others, but these are the ones that come to mind. Hope it helps!

    P.s. regarding sharpening, just get the spyderco sharpener and be done with it.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #5 on: February 24, 2017, 10:42:03 PM »
    Nothing at all wrong with being a deft hand at game processing. But knowing how to improvise tools with nothing but a knife is pretty cool. Making camp chairs, beds, cooking rigs, shelters, etc. Knowing how to build different kinds of fires and for different purposes and being able to make fire with only a single stick and a firesteel is awesome.

    Also, wait until you start getting into different kinds of steels. That's when things get interesting. When you get to the point that you're rocking Crucible supersteels, tool steels, high carbon steels, and spring steels, and know what the wear resistance, toughness, and corrosion resistance is for each kind, then you'll know you've gotten hard core. 

    Adskii

    • Senior Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 791

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #6 on: February 24, 2017, 11:01:40 PM »
    Just wait until you start making them. :D

    I managed to forge weld some steel cable, and now I have grandiose plans for the rest of it. Interspersed with some high carbon "sucker rod" I bet I can make a neat patterned knife.

    I also have a "friend" (same guy who got me into blacksmithing) who now has me hooked on casting molten metal. It starts with a few railroad spikes and ends up with you looking at damascus and mokume gane. As a reward for helping him with some scouts who were casting knives from aluminum bronze (neat stuff) we are going to be casting swords "soon". I love molten metal casting, and the aluminum bronze looks like gold, but can be hard as cast iron. Everyday carry? no. Glorious golden sword with polished black walnut handles? Oh yes.

    MTK20

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5340
    • Mind of a philosopher, mouth of a sailor.

    • Online
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #7 on: February 24, 2017, 11:32:55 PM »
    Nothing at all wrong with being a deft hand at game processing. But knowing how to improvise tools with nothing but a knife is pretty cool. Making camp chairs, beds, cooking rigs, shelters, etc. Knowing how to build different kinds of fires and for different purposes and being able to make fire with only a single stick and a firesteel is awesome.

    Also, wait until you start getting into different kinds of steels. That's when things get interesting. When you get to the point that you're rocking Crucible supersteels, tool steels, high carbon steels, and spring steels, and know what the wear resistance, toughness, and corrosion resistance is for each kind, then you'll know you've gotten hard core. 

    I've gotten to the steel knowledge point  :-[ (granted my knowledge is still limited, just like in all other subjects).

    I must admit though, what is a crucible steel? My knives hang around the 8cr13mov and 1095 range. I've looked into a little tool steel, but I don't like rust. Same goes for the spring steel used in the Glocks.

    Is crucible steel like what the San Mai layered falkniven blades are made of? Those things are like a Bushcrafters wet dream, from what I hear, also stupidly hard to sharpen. I think they scored a 62 on the Rockwell hardness scale?
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    ZeroTA

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 2879
    • Minister of Random Punishments

    • Offline
    Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #8 on: February 24, 2017, 11:48:50 PM »
    I use my knives to actually do stuff on site. I don't hunt, so my needs may be a little different.

    But I run them hard. And tbh it's nothing a utility razor couldn't handle (which I use when I have my tool belt on). But I use my blades to strip wire up to 3/0 (that's your 200 amp service wire), cut plastic lumber straps, cut drain tile, etc. Drain tile is a good test of your blade, it's hard on an edge. OTOH you don't need a particularly sharp blade to cut that, although you do for stripping wires.

    I like tangos/modified tantos and wharncliffes, as the point is good for scoring and the straight edge is good for general cutting. Again, if I had other used my preference might vary.

    And for defensive uses, you can shank a guy with a clip, tanto, or wharncliffe and it won't really make a bit of difference.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm not saying you should use an M1A for home defense, but I'm also not saying you shouldn't.

    coelacanth

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 7138
    • eccentric orbit

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #9 on: February 25, 2017, 01:00:24 AM »
    Well, these guys stole a lot of my thunder - especially Desert Rat.  He and I think a lot alike on most things with blades.  Bushcrafting forces you to concentrate on technique and skill by making do with a minimum of equipment.  You learn pretty quickly what works well and what doesn't when you have to use one tool to make all your other tools.  Bushcrafting knives tend to be the equivalent of a middleweight boxer and the really good knives tend to be like a middleweight boxer that punches well above his weight class.  What makes a good bushcrafter?  Several things combine to make the best ones:
     
     Steel:  Many of the best are 1095 carbon steel.  It is tough, it hardens well, it is easy to sharpen and it takes a wonderful edge.  And it will rust.  If you're going to go with a stainless steel 440C is a good one - especially for larger blades.  If you want something thoroughly modern with performance akin to Mjolnir I'd recommend Elmax.  Whatever you choose has to be hard and tough enough to hold an edge under adverse conditions without being prone to chipping.  A proper heat treatment is critical to this type of performance.

      Handle material:  Lots of knives are pretty.  Some are too much so to actually use.  Regardless how much a knife calls to you from the display case or the maker's display table, if you can't work with that knife for hours on end without developing blisters or hand cramps it doesn't need to come home with you.  Part of the ability to do that is derived from the design but a lot is also due to the handle material.  I have dozens of knives with all manner of handle designs and materials but the very best ones are made from arctic curly birch, linen micarta or stacked leather. 

    Sheath:  It is absolutely essential that the sheath you carry your knife in be capable of keeping the knife securely inside until you choose to withdraw it.  If the sheath cannot be depended on to retain the knife under all conditions, protect the knife( and you ) in all conditions and withstand considerable abuse without losing its ability to function properly - throw it away.  Far, far away.

    There's room for some difference of opinion regarding the ideal size of a bushcrafting knife but in my experience the best ones have relatively heavy blades ranging from 5" to 8" long.   The point should not be too thin and exaggerated and it should line up with the middle of the handle and the blade should be a plain edge rather than serrated or even partially serrated.  The tang should extend all the way to the butt of the handle whether its a full tang design or stick tang with a heavy pommel plate.  I prefer a lanyard hole somewhere near the butt of the handle .   

    All that said, I cheat.    :cool    I bring a pocket knife, a folding saw, a belt hatchet, storm matches and a firearm along with me as a matter of course on just about any outdoor excursion that takes me beyond shouting distance from civilization.  Make no mistake, I practice my technique and hone my skill with the big knife but cleaning dove, quail and squirrels with the equivalent of a WWII  Marine Corps Ka-Bar is troublesome at best.   There are simply better tools for the job.   For chopping chores an axe - regardless of its size - beats a knife every time.  If you have to hack your way through jungle type vegetation get a machete - nothing works better for that.  For self defense, always remember - never bring a knife to a gun fight. 
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #10 on: February 25, 2017, 01:01:25 AM »
    I've gotten to the steel knowledge point  :-[ (granted my knowledge is still limited, just like in all other subjects).

    I must admit though, what is a crucible steel? My knives hang around the 8cr13mov and 1095 range. I've looked into a little tool steel, but I don't like rust. Same goes for the spring steel used in the Glocks.

    Is crucible steel like what the San Mai layered falkniven blades are made of? Those things are like a Bushcrafters wet dream, from what I hear, also stupidly hard to sharpen. I think they scored a 62 on the Rockwell hardness scale?

    I'm talking here about Crucible Particle Metallurgy. That's the Crucible powdered supersteels available in all manner of flavors, from the super tough 3V steel to the super edge-holding S110v and S125v. And yeah, some of those are hard to sharpen without the right kind of sharpeners because they run to the high RC scale. S125v can go to RC 65! The highest I personally own is a Bark River Adventurer II in CPM 20CV at RC 62-63. It's a hell of a slicer!



    At the opposite scale of the Crucible lines are their super tough tool steels such as 3V, that sacrifice a certain degree of wear resistance for toughness, and they usually sit at RC 58-60. I've got several in 3V, such as this Bark River Dark Timber Grizzly at right, pictured next to my Tora Blades Kirante Sirupate. Yes, I love them both. :)


    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #11 on: February 25, 2017, 01:09:35 AM »
    Well, these guys stole a lot of my thunder - especially Desert Rat.  He and I think a lot alike on most things with blades.  Bushcrafting forces you to concentrate on technique and skill by making do with a minimum of equipment.  You learn pretty quickly what works well and what doesn't when you have to use one tool to make all your other tools.  Bushcrafting knives tend to be the equivalent of a middleweight boxer and the really good knives tend to be like a middleweight boxer that punches well above his weight class.  What makes a good bushcrafter?  Several things combine to make the best ones:
     
     Steel:  Many of the best are 1095 carbon steel.  It is tough, it hardens well, it is easy to sharpen and it takes a wonderful edge.  And it will rust.  If you're going to go with a stainless steel 440C is a good one - especially for larger blades.  If you want something thoroughly modern with performance akin to Mjolnir I'd recommend Elmax.  Whatever you choose has to be hard and tough enough to hold an edge under adverse conditions without being prone to chipping.  A proper heat treatment is critical to this type of performance.

      Handle material:  Lots of knives are pretty.  Some are too much so to actually use.  Regardless how much a knife calls to you from the display case or the maker's display table, if you can't work with that knife for hours on end without developing blisters or hand cramps it doesn't need to come home with you.  Part of the ability to do that is derived from the design but a lot is also due to the handle material.  I have dozens of knives with all manner of handle designs and materials but the very best ones are made from arctic curly birch, linen micarta or stacked leather. 

    Sheath:  It is absolutely essential that the sheath you carry your knife in be capable of keeping the knife securely inside until you choose to withdraw it.  If the sheath cannot be depended on to retain the knife under all conditions, protect the knife( and you ) in all conditions and withstand considerable abuse without losing its ability to function properly - throw it away.  Far, far away.

    There's room for some difference of opinion regarding the ideal size of a bushcrafting knife but in my experience the best ones have relatively heavy blades ranging from 5" to 8" long.   The point should not be too thin and exaggerated and it should line up with the middle of the handle and the blade should be a plain edge rather than serrated or even partially serrated.  The tang should extend all the way to the butt of the handle whether its a full tang design or stick tang with a heavy pommel plate.  I prefer a lanyard hole somewhere near the butt of the handle .   

    All that said, I cheat.    :cool    I bring a pocket knife, a folding saw, a belt hatchet, storm matches and a firearm along with me as a matter of course on just about any outdoor excursion that takes me beyond shouting distance from civilization.  Make no mistake, I practice my technique and hone my skill with the big knife but cleaning dove, quail and squirrels with the equivalent of a WWII  Marine Corps Ka-Bar is troublesome at best.   There are simply better tools for the job.   For chopping chores an axe - regardless of its size - beats a knife every time.  If you have to hack your way through jungle type vegetation get a machete - nothing works better for that.  For self defense, always remember - never bring a knife to a gun fight. 

    Yep.  :thumbup1


    Mikee5star

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1632

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #12 on: February 25, 2017, 01:18:22 AM »
    I have the knife addition also.  I don't know steel real well, just what I like and don't like.  I like carbon steel but I have a hard time finding the modern designs/actions in it at my price point.  Rust doesn't scare me, I live near, on and occasionally in salt water.  Everything, just about, will corrode if you mistreat it or ignore it.

    If you decide you want a high dollar custom knife, look at it three times and walk away twice.  After I got over the shiny, I realized that the first one I bought could have been made better by a third grade shop class. 

    For fixed blades decide what you like, what works for you, and then don't buy other designs/shapes/steels.  Unless you are buying for investment or because you want them for wall hangers.

    For my use I prefer a sheepsfoot /Wharncliff blade shapes for day to day use.  Drop or clip point are my second favorites.  I have little or no use for tantos.  I don't carry a fixed blade knife everyday, so my first design consideration is assisted opening folder.  Second I only carry locking folders, and prefer liner locks.  Third, an EDC for me will be between 3-4" blade, smaller and I just as well use a razor utility knife which I always have in my nail belt, and I have not found a larger one that I can carry comfortably. Fourth, what is the handle like? I prefer a thin handle profile with out finger grooves.  Fifth consideration is blade shape.  As long as it is not too swoopy I can make most blade shapes work.  5b is grind, I also prefer a flat grind for every day use and skinning.  The grind can make a good blade shape unuseable, and vise versa.  Sixth is steel type including Rockwell hardness.

    I have found the US made Kershaws to be my go to brand for day to day use.  I am sold on the Speed Safe system for assisted opening, and I carry at least one all the time.  My favorite Kershaw is the Needs Work, sheepsfoot, assisted opening, 3" blade and a slim yet hand filling handle.  The handle materials on most of the Kershaws leave something to be desired, but I can live with cheaper handle materials due to price point. Because of how I abuse them and lose them, I don't carry high dollar knives everyday.  But the cheap ones won't sharpen easily or hold an edge well enough to suit me.  I break or lose one or two a year, so $30-50 is my EDC price point.

    This week I used one or the other of the two I am carrying currently to, sharpen pencils, cut plastic lumber straps, cut 1" and 1 1/2" manila line, tarred # 36 seine hanging cord, scrap stickers off closet rod, trim sheetrock, as a pry bar to install closet doors, and to clean under my finger nails.  I am sure that I am forgetting some uses.   If I can't sharpen a Ticonderoga pencil sharp, the knife is not sharp enough, if it can't stay sharp enough for that, for a week with other normal use it goes in the drawer.

    Edited to add pictures:  First is the two I am EDC currently to show shape.  Second shows thickness with a pencil above and a Zippo below for comparison.  Third shows the folders that are or have been in recent EDC rotation.  The CRKT, a flipper, and the Buck, the purple one, are dress/church carry not for work.
    « Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 01:41:27 AM by Mikee5star »
    Alaska

    Grant

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 7843

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #13 on: February 25, 2017, 08:33:34 AM »
    All that said, I cheat.    :cool    I bring a pocket knife, a folding saw, a belt hatchet, storm matches and a firearm along with me as a matter of course on just about any outdoor excursion that takes me beyond shouting distance from civilization.  Make no mistake, I practice my technique and hone my skill with the big knife but cleaning dove, quail and squirrels with the equivalent of a WWII  Marine Corps Ka-Bar is troublesome at best.   There are simply better tools for the job.   For chopping chores an axe - regardless of its size - beats a knife every time.  If you have to hack your way through jungle type vegetation get a machete - nothing works better for that.  For self defense, always remember - never bring a knife to a gun fight. 

     See that's the part why I raised the question.......I've practiced a lot of the uses for a bush knife......I...*cough*....have the unfortunate habit of using the right tool rather than "making do", though that's actually a good thing to learn.   It's just hard for me to not use a small hand axe, compact folding saw and pocket knife rather than bulling through with one big-assed knife  :P   

       I may have to try and curtail that habit since that'll help justify needing more knives......... :D   

      Lotsa good information, sorta leans my in the direction I was looking, sheaths always been important along with a full tang and comfortable handle, just have to look into the various steels a lot more.
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #14 on: February 25, 2017, 10:29:30 AM »
    See that's the part why I raised the question.......I've practiced a lot of the uses for a bush knife......I...*cough*....have the unfortunate habit of using the right tool rather than "making do", though that's actually a good thing to learn.   It's just hard for me to not use a small hand axe, compact folding saw and pocket knife rather than bulling through with one big-assed knife  :P   

       I may have to try and curtail that habit since that'll help justify needing more knives......... :D   

      Lotsa good information, sorta leans my in the direction I was looking, sheaths always been important along with a full tang and comfortable handle, just have to look into the various steels a lot more.

    Knives made from good old 1095 is a good start. Becker Knife and Tool, Esee, TOPS (although I'm usually not a fan of the grinds), and Ontario are all good places to start. Basically the Evil Black Knives. They are affordable, tough as nails, and very customizable. I threw in TOPS, but if you're going to buy a TOPS knife, then I would just start to upgrade to mid-techs or semi-customs like Bark Rivers, Ambush Knives, American Knife Company, Blackjack, L.T. Wright's, Lon Humphrey's, Dark Timbers (if you can find one), etc. Much better bang for your buck, and the handle options are much greater.

    Incidentally, I'm also of the opinion that multiple tools is always the right call. In the field I usually pack a big knife, small knife, folder, and folding saw at the minimum. Sometimes I'll throw a small axe or hatchet in as well. Are they all absolutely necessary? Not especially. But they are fun, and when you've found that perfect tool for the job it makes a day in the woods far more interesting and fun.



    For reference, that's a Tora Blades Ft. William Mk. 1 kukri, Bark River Gunny, Becker BK-7, and Silky Pocketboy folding saw that lives in the utility pouch on the BK-7's sheath.

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #15 on: February 25, 2017, 10:32:20 AM »
    If you decide you want a high dollar custom knife, look at it three times and walk away twice.  After I got over the shiny, I realized that the first one I bought could have been made better by a third grade shop class.

    That is such good advice. I own a couple of knives I wished I'd done this to. Well, more than a couple, probably.

    katmandoo

    • This is gonna take crackerjack timing Wang...
    • Member
    • **
    • Posts: 264

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #16 on: February 25, 2017, 10:50:47 AM »






    Gotta know, who makes it and how do I get one?
    MinnesotaKevin - Stillwater, MN

    "The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes....Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man."

    Thomas Jefferson's "Commonplace Book," 1774-1776, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in Chapter 40 of "On Crimes and Punishment", 1764

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #17 on: February 25, 2017, 11:06:33 AM »

    Gotta know, who makes it and how do I get one?

    That is a Blackhawk Tatang. Designed by Michael Janich, it's basically a combination of a Filipino barong, Bowie knife, and sub-hilt fighter. Made of 1085 high carbon steel and the swedge is sharpened at the factory. Very cool knife and very affordable, though it comes with probably the worst sheath I've ever gotten in a production knife. You ever play Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2? This is one of the knives you use in the game. Started out like this.



    I did the custom work on it. Stripped, sanded, the jimping rounded, the scales stippled completely, blue-bleach etch, acid etched, and the edge convexed. An afternoon's work and it looks almost custom now. :D





    Added.
    « Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 11:48:33 AM by Desert Rat »

    katmandoo

    • This is gonna take crackerjack timing Wang...
    • Member
    • **
    • Posts: 264

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #18 on: February 25, 2017, 11:45:29 AM »
    That is a Blackhawk Tatang. Designed by Michael Janich, it's basically a combination of a Filipino barong, Bowie knife, and sub-hilt fighter. Made of 1085 high carbon steel and the swedge is sharpened at the factory. Very cool knife and very affordable, though it comes with probably the worst sheath I've ever gotten in a production knife. You ever play Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2? This is one of the knives you use in the game. Started out like this.



    I did the custom work on it. Stripped, sanded, the jimping rounded, the scales stippled completely, blue-bleach etch, acid etched, and the edge convexed. An afternoon's work and it looks almost custom now. :D
    I'm going to have to check it out, you did a very nice job on it.  Very cool.  At first glance I thought might be the TOPS pig hunter which I've been diggin' on for a bit

    https://www.topsknives.com/knives/hunting/wild-pig-hunter



    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    MinnesotaKevin - Stillwater, MN

    "The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes....Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man."

    Thomas Jefferson's "Commonplace Book," 1774-1776, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in Chapter 40 of "On Crimes and Punishment", 1764

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #19 on: February 25, 2017, 11:51:08 AM »
    Thanks. Been modding knives for a long time. This was the third knife I modded, the first being a Becker BK-2 and the second a Becker BK-5. I'd probably do it differently today, but I do like how it turned out.

    katmandoo

    • This is gonna take crackerjack timing Wang...
    • Member
    • **
    • Posts: 264

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #20 on: February 25, 2017, 12:10:16 PM »
    Thanks. Been modding knives for a long time. This was the third knife I modded, the first being a Becker BK-2 and the second a Becker BK-5. I'd probably do it differently today, but I do like how it turned out.
    Well I'm not a fan of Blackhawk but I definitely love what you did with it.  Much better than the original.  I've never done much with my knives but going to need to look at messing with a few now, might even pick up that Blackhawk for fun. 



    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

    MinnesotaKevin - Stillwater, MN

    "The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes....Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man."

    Thomas Jefferson's "Commonplace Book," 1774-1776, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in Chapter 40 of "On Crimes and Punishment", 1764

    Grant

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 7843

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #21 on: February 25, 2017, 01:23:38 PM »
       Incidentally, hoping that on my next trip to Tennessee my fiancée's family's neighbor is home.    He's the guy who founded/produces ESEE knives  :cool   Got to handle some at SMKW, some quality blades.

       
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    MTK20

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 5340
    • Mind of a philosopher, mouth of a sailor.

    • Online
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #22 on: February 25, 2017, 01:49:24 PM »
       Incidentally, hoping that on my next trip to Tennessee my fiancée's family's neighbor is home.    He's the guy who founded/produces ESEE knives  :cool   Got to handle some at SMKW, some quality blades.

     

    I've lusted for an ESEE 3 for a very long time  :cool.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    Desert Rat

    • Contributor
    • ****
    • Posts: 1283

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #23 on: February 25, 2017, 01:58:16 PM »
       Incidentally, hoping that on my next trip to Tennessee my fiancée's family's neighbor is home.    He's the guy who founded/produces ESEE knives  :cool   Got to handle some at SMKW, some quality blades.

       

    Jeff Randall? That's pretty cool. He's also the guy that designed the RAT series of knives for Ontario. There's a whole lotta drama behind that story.

    A tip for the Esee's, if you're going to get one.

    The Esee's are pretty great as is, but they really need some Knife Connection G-10 scales if you're going to do a lot of bushcraft with them. The flat factory micarta scales are nice for EDC and quick jobs, but once you use them for a while the thin handle begins to make your hand sore, especially for carving or chopping wood.

    The good news is that The Knife Connection will sell you just the blade minus the factory micarta, then a set of their awesomely contoured G-10 scales in the color you want, and then a sheath, for a good price. TKC is the way to go, and the owner, Dale, is a nice guy. The TKC G-10 are very well made and comfortable for the Becker line, but they make the Esee's shine. A must have, in my opinion. If I owned more Esee's, they'd all sport TKC scales. As it is, I just have the one, and the little Esee-3 I own is more of an EDC knife, though you can use it for bushcraft in short spurts.



    I really like the alternate version of the Esee-3. If this had been out when I got mine, I'd have gone with it. No choil, thick handle, perfect for small carving chores and all around use; leather sheath. I may get one anyway, I like it that much.


    luke213(adamsholsters)

    • Senior Contributor
    • *****
    • Posts: 3159
      • Adams Holsters

    • Offline
    Re: Myriad of knife ramblings (And a question at the end for real knife guys)
    « Reply #24 on: February 25, 2017, 02:02:45 PM »
    So my theory of knives is that generally they are a catch all tool sometimes especially bigger knives. They can do all the tasks for the most part you'd do with a pocket knife, and an axe but neither as well as a dedicated tool. But they are lighter if you need both rather than all three. So if you're bringing them with you it's nice to carry less rather than more.

    So in my case when I go out in the woods which is pretty much anytime I'm not heading to town and I leave the yard I typically carry a good sized fixed blade. Mostly since this area is remote and if I head away from the river there isn't really anyone around and no one to help if you have trouble. There are a few thousand acres behind our place some private, allot of Wisconsin Electric property and highly unlikely there will be another person out there at any given time. Maybe someone may be at a camp or something but it's just not likely unless it's deer season. So if you get stranded etc, you had better have prepared to some degree and brought some tools with you. So in that case I really like a big fixed blade on my belt and part of that is why I developed my original concealed carry style sheath. And I'll say while it conceals what I like most is at least for me it stays out of my way day to day so I can carry it as well or nearly as well as a gun on my weak side.

     Blade steel, I like 1095 allot, don't mind 1070 but I'm less of a fan. Haven't owned or used allot of super steels though my brother is into them pretty heavily and I have handled and used them some. I need to do more with them because I'm interested in the technology and performance of them. Generally though my theory is 1095 makes a good/great knife when done properly, and can be had for pretty cheap and make a good user knife. It's fairly well known for cheap I really like the Schrade SCHF 1095 knives, they take a beating and I haven't broken one yet. Actually that is what I typically carry for a fixed blade.

    Pocket knives, I carry a Kershaw most all the time I dig the Cryo 2 allot enough so that when I ruined one a few years ago. I tried a bunch of other knives, and ended up buying another Cryo 2 to replace it. I don't love the blade steel it's 8cr13mov which is ok. Edge retention isn't ideal and it's a steel that rolls pretty easily. However it's fairly easy to sharpen as well. I use my pocket knife for light duty stuff. That said it's a stout frame lock and will do heavier tasks in an emergency.

    So I think for a single tool a middle sized fixed blade maybe 5-6in. blade is a good compromise tool. Even better a good sized fixed blade and a good folder with a fine edge. And even better those two tools and a mid sized axe, will do even better or possibly a much larger knife or machete depending on the area etc.

    I will say I like to keep a large fixed blade in the cars too, mostly as a survival tool of sorts if needed but it's just one tool as well.

    Luke
    MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

    Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.