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Author Topic: You ain't the only hunter in the woods  (Read 2503 times)

aikorob

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You ain't the only hunter in the woods
« on: November 24, 2014, 03:15:43 PM »
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/11/24/gps-study-tracks-grizzlies-as-follow-hunters/

Thought this was interesting................and a little scary. Most folks situational awareness is out the window immediately following a successful shot--concentrating on tracking the animal, and harvesting the meat. Food for thought
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    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #1 on: November 24, 2014, 03:40:43 PM »
    Around here the issue is primarily wolves, once it gets into hunting season bears are mostly settling down for winter, but the wolves of course aren't. We used to wait 45 minutes to an hour before going out to track a deer to make sure it bled out before running up on it. If you don't they sometimes will jump up and keep running and clot or just die somewhere you can't find them. Now 30 minutes tops, any longer and there won't be anything left but a big wide circle of blood and bits and not much else by the time you get there. Sometimes happens even with the short time, and sometimes they jump and you've got more tracking or trouble with tracking because of it.

    At the end of the day I'm really tired of the wolves, they have killed so much of our deer population combined with the hard winters we've had that there really aren't many deer around. Right now I've got 4 coming in, a big doe, last years fawn, and twins from this year. I'm not shooting any of those 4, mostly the doe is the only one who would be worth taking, and well maybe I'm a softy since they have been hanging around the house for several years. But that said I haven't seen much of anything else at all this year at my house.

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    seanp

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #2 on: November 24, 2014, 04:06:45 PM »
    Every year at least one hunter around here has a tangle with a bear.  Sometimes a grizzly, but more often a black bear.  Usually, if the hunter is alone, that's it for the hunter.
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    JesseL

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #3 on: November 24, 2014, 04:16:28 PM »
    We don't get any of the really cool animals after us here.  :(

    I'm not likely to be bit by anything but snakes, cranky javelina, and the occasional rabid mountain lion.  :-\
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    Mikee5star

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #4 on: November 24, 2014, 04:27:09 PM »
    We don't have any blackies around here, but I have been curious about griz behavior.  Folk lore says that only polar bears track and actively hunt healthy adult humans.  I always keep a big handgun on me while butchering in the field.  Of course the shorty is loaded and close while smoking salmon or jerky.  Ermine to brownies like what is in the smoke house.

    Bears are spooky stealthy even before you take their size, speed and power into consideration.
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    Plebian

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #5 on: November 24, 2014, 05:41:37 PM »
    We don't have any blackies around here, but I have been curious about griz behavior.  Folk lore says that only polar bears track and actively hunt healthy adult humans.  I always keep a big handgun on me while butchering in the field.  Of course the shorty is loaded and close while smoking salmon or jerky.  Ermine to brownies like what is in the smoke house.

    Bears are spooky stealthy even before you take their size, speed and power into consideration.

    I have spent a few summers in Alaska, and I always thought the odd lore of browns not stalking humans as sorta correct but off base. The bear might not be stalking you for fact, but if it is following you seeing you as a food source. Then it kills you 'accidentally' to get food. That really doesn't help you at all. It may have only been interested in that tasty elk/fish, but that doesn't make you any less dead. 
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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #6 on: November 27, 2014, 05:01:04 PM »
    Had coyotes watching us from a treeline about 200 yards away while field dressing deer this season.  We gut them all in the same spot here on the farm so it's like a buffet for the local scavengers.  It was fun to go check all the tracks after it snowed.  Coyotes, foxes, bobcats you name it.  A day or two after you had trouble even seeing where the gut pile had been.
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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #7 on: November 27, 2014, 06:55:37 PM »
    Last deer I got was a 2 hour drag back to the truck after dark.  With a pack of coyotes circling me just out of sight in the trees the whole way.  Lots of clouds, no moon, and in the timber.  So the pistol stayed in my hand while the drag line was over the other shoulder.

    Very glad I practice point shooting often enough to be petty good at it........  A scoped rifle after dark at close quarters would have been nothing but a decent club in that case.
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    coelacanth

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #8 on: November 28, 2014, 01:25:20 AM »
    We don't get any of the really cool animals after us here.  :(

    I'm not likely to be bit by anything but snakes, cranky javelina, and the occasional rabid mountain lion.  :-\
    Don't forget about the black bears that were raiding campgrounds near Payson a couple of years ago.   Once a bear gets a taste of campground s'mores there's no stopping them   .   .   .     :panic
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    Kaso

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #9 on: November 28, 2014, 09:22:45 AM »
    ...and the occasional rabid mountain lion.  :-\
      :shocked I can honestly say that such an animal would frighten me more than anything else on earth.  Speed and stealth of a cat, combined with the inhibitions of rabies...  I would hope at least, that the rabies takes the edge off of their 'cat-ness.'



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    JesseL

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #10 on: November 28, 2014, 10:22:56 AM »
      :shocked I can honestly say that such an animal would frighten me more than anything else on earth.  Speed and stealth of a cat, combined with the inhibitions of rabies...  I would hope at least, that the rabies takes the edge off of their 'cat-ness.'

    http://dcourier.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=106422
    Quote
    Rabid mountain lion in attack mode no match for Chino Valley man and his frying pan
    If someone told you they killed a rabid mountain lion with a frying pan, would you believe it?

    Chino Valley resident Brandon Arnold has such a story, and he has witnesses to prove it.

    Arnold, 24, his girlfriend Tessa Gerdes and seven of their Chino Valley friends, including three children, were camping May 4 at a remote spot on the Tonto National Forest, near the Verde River off Bloody Basin Road, when the story of a lifetime unfolded.

    They were getting ready to make breakfast at about 6:45 a.m. when a large animal jumped out of the bushes onto the back of Arnold's dog Apollo, a 90-pound lab-pit bull mix.

    "It was hard to tell what it was when it jumped out of there covered with grass and smelling like a skunk," Arnold's friend Donald Jones said. "I thought it was somebody's dog, so I was just pissed off somebody brought a mean dog to camp."

    Jones grabbed the neck of both the animals to try to pull them apart.

    That's when they all figured out the other animal wasn't a dog.

    Jones let go real fast.

    "I started screaming at the top of my lungs, 'Holy (bleep), it's a mountain lion!'" Arnold recalled.

    The lion ran into the mesquite bushes and Apollo ran after it while the men frantically looked for the nearest weapon. Jones grabbed a camping table and Arnold grabbed a 14-inch cast-iron skillet heating up on the propane stove. Arnold got to the lion and dog fight first and did what he had to do to save Apollo.

    "The first time I had a clear shot I just swung the pan and hit him right on the head," Arnold said. "It was like a cartoon - he just kind of stopped and I hit him again. He got stiff and fell over."

    He hit it several more times, then another friend shot it a couple of times just to make sure it was dead.

    Figuring only a rabid lion would act like that, they contacted the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The positive rabies results came back Monday.

    Amazingly, no one besides Apollo was scratched, or they'd have to get expensive and painful rabies shots. Apollo already had his rabies shots. He suffered gashes and scratches but they weren't life-threatening. He has to stay in quarantine at home for 45 days.

    "Everybody was lucky," Jones said. "Even the dog was lucky. We'll never win the lottery because we used up all our luck right there."

    The group continued their camping weekend, although they moved to a site with fewer bushes around it.

    They sat down and started talking about what just happened.

    "We all figured when we went back, nobody was going to believe us," Arnold related. "Man, it was the craziest thing I ever experienced."

    Arnold is sheepish about his heroics, saying Apollo is his baby and he didn't want him to die.

    "It was the adrenaline," he said. "I'm not a badass or anything."

    Jones can't wait to tell his grandkids the story.

    "They won't believe me," he said.

    That's an area I spend a lot of time in.
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    Plebian

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    Re: You ain't the only hunter in the woods
    « Reply #11 on: November 28, 2014, 10:51:04 AM »
    Most felines are lightly boned animals. IF you can land a square hit. You can easily break bones/injure organs. That is the reason most of the cat family are not head to head fighters. They ambush, and if the prey is not put out of commission quickly they usually escape to set another ambush.
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