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Author Topic: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.  (Read 11882 times)

THE NORSEMAN

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Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
« Reply #50 on: October 19, 2011, 09:04:47 PM »
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Just remember- Always pre-heat your iron.  ALWAYS.
 Can't say that often enough.

Especially with new ironware.  To test, flick a drop of water in the pan.  If it doesn't instantly hiss, spit, and turn to steam, the pan isn't hot enough to cook with yet.  

If you are having sticking problems, let the pan cool completely after cooking.  This will usually release the majority of the stuck food particles.  Then rinse and wipe out with VERY hot to the touch water.

Don't worry, it'll come around.  Just use it a time or 2 per week, and within a month you should have all the kinks shook out.
This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty. . . . The right of self defence is the first law of nature: in most governments it has been the study of rulers to confine this right within the narrowest limits possible. Wherever standing armies are kept up, and the right of the people to keep and bear arms is, under any colour or pretext whatsoever, prohibited, liberty, if not already annihilated, is on the brink of destruction- St. George Tucker, Blackstone's Commentaries

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    mnw42

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #51 on: November 01, 2011, 12:50:34 AM »
    For really stuck on stuff I you can boil water in the pan.  The action of the water will lift much of the stuck bits off and then  poor it off.  Keep the pan hot, dry it out with a paper towel.  Re-oil it immediately and before it has a chance to cool.

    If it is really bad then the steel wool (not Brillo) comes out.
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    jimbob86

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #52 on: December 08, 2012, 06:10:31 PM »
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    With proper care, durability is unsurpassed.

    Even with improper care, no care at all, or even outright abuse, all is not lost: my very best pan was salvaged from a scrapyard, and had some pretty serious rust issues.  A couple hours of elbow grease, a wire cup on a drill, and a palm sander ...... seasoned it and it gets used daily now.

    So long as it's not cracked or have holes shot in it, it is salvageable.

    Ken Brock

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #53 on: December 08, 2012, 09:37:57 PM »
    I've never been impressed with coated cookware...it has never worked that well for me and tends to eventually gain scratches.

    Cast iron, on the other hand, I can cook with pretty well...

    Cast iron is also very affordable. Made in the USA, 100% cast iron Lodge cookware can even be brought at Wal-Mart for reasonable prices. A trip to the jockey lot yields vintage cookware...

    I recommend a large, deep skillet if you can only have one piece of cast iron cookware. Frying a steak, making gravy, baking a roast in the oven, frying chicken, cooking french fries, making pancakes are just SOME of the varied things you can do with it. You'll want to get a griddle, other pans, and such later, but I consider the large skillet to be the most versatile.

    I use a cast iron pot to deep fry. I have a huge cast iron washpot for making hash and stews in large quantity.

    Here in the South cast iron is passed down just like guns and tools...

    dude! you mentioned the Jockey Lot! I live like 20 minutes from there

    on topic, all I cook with anymore is cast iron

    I initially seasoned mine with flaxseed oil but maintain it with bacon grease or coconut oil
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    Evil Jim

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #54 on: December 08, 2012, 09:47:31 PM »
    Gotta love the Jockey Lot, next time I am home... Caryn and I need to make a run into town.


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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #55 on: January 03, 2016, 11:26:56 AM »
    Always and do mean always when curing or seasoning cast iorn use lard not anything else as this is what has been used for them since first used
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    GeorgeHill

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #56 on: January 03, 2016, 11:33:08 AM »
    Peanut Oil works well too.  Lard is traditionally used because of availability, not superiority.
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    webeable

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #57 on: January 03, 2016, 01:22:58 PM »
    Peanut Oil works well too.  Lard is traditionally used because of availability, not superiority.

    Most veggy oils turn stick where LARD turns to carbon.
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    Gunnguy

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #58 on: January 03, 2016, 10:30:47 PM »
    Read up on a scientific article about using Food Grade Flax Seed Oil to season the cast iron.
    You don't cook with it. Just use it to season the pan and the steps are as follows:

    Prep- Wash the cast iron to remove any grease, oils, debris, or rust.

    1)Take a clean cloth and wipe the cast iron with a light coat of food grade Flax Seed oil.
    2)Wait five minutes and wipe as much excess off as you can.
    3)Heat the cast iron to 500 degrees for six hours.
    4)Let cool for about two hours.

    Repeat steps 1 through 4 until you have done this for 6 to 8 times.

    What this does in causes the oil to embed itself into the cast iron. Changes the structure of the oil to a hard carbonized material.
    When cooking just wipe with a normal cooking oil and use as you usually do.
    Clean with hot water. Wipe dry. Should remain seasoned and rust free for years.
    So far my one Griswold seems to be doing rather well even after just three treatments. Will report later on this and find that article.

     


     Tried it.
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    Gunnguy

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    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

    coelacanth

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #60 on: January 04, 2016, 11:18:24 PM »
    Good article.  Thanks for posting it.   :cool   
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    Gunnguy

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    Re: Cooking with cast iron, pointers and tips.
    « Reply #61 on: January 10, 2016, 03:03:59 AM »
    Your welcome!
    Indiana'The average response time of a 911 call is over 23 minutes, the average response time of a .44 magnum is 1400 feet per second.'

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