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Author Topic: CCW and Changing Platforms.  (Read 1400 times)

MTK20

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CCW and Changing Platforms.
« on: February 22, 2017, 10:36:24 AM »
We've all heard people say not to switch platforms or carry positions because "it'll getcha kilt in da streetz", but what say y'all? On this forum we seem to not really obey this "rule". I don't think carrying a 1911 and then carrying a Glock the next day is a recipe for death. Even our older members have no qualms about carrying a K frame and then a 1911. Two firearms with completely different battery of arms.
Texas
Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

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    StevenTing

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #1 on: February 22, 2017, 11:13:12 AM »
    For me, I carry the same gun for a length of time, usually 4-6 month stretches.  I do change guns but there's a long time inbetween those changes.  That's mostly because the rest of the firearms are in the safe and I don't take the time to swap them out.

    Utah

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #2 on: February 22, 2017, 12:23:19 PM »
    I carry the guns I have shot enough to know I can use them under stress, and that they are reliable.  But I have no qualms about switching between my Glocks, 1911's and CZ pattern handguns.
    Utah

    RetroGrouch

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #3 on: February 22, 2017, 01:04:25 PM »
    The most complicated manual of arms handgun I carry is a 1911.  Oh the humanity! That thumb safety will get you killed!  Next most complicated is an HK P7.  A squeeze cocker!  You'll never remember to grip it hard enough!  Last is a Kahr P9.  That long trigger pull and reset will slow you down so much the bad guy will shoot you before you get a shot off!


    Seriously, I don't worry about it as the manual of arms and ergonomics are so close on most guns as to make no difference.  I've practiced and used a 1911 so much that my thumb goes right to where the safety should be, and I don't even know when I take the safety off in the draw.
    Arizona

    MTK20

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #4 on: February 22, 2017, 01:52:49 PM »
    George frequently changes guns. 1911, Sig P220, SP101, Glock 23, Beretta 92, etc.

    Wonder what his opinion is on all this.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #5 on: February 22, 2017, 02:12:43 PM »
    Here is my theory of things like this, or at least how I handle it. Most of my carry guns are 1911's, which have a manual safety and a single action trigger. By that method, they are the most complicated guns in my carry rotation to shoot, because I've got to disengage the safety, then fire. Where things like my PF9 are just point and shoot though with a long trigger pull in that case. And most of my guns follow the same basic functions, though I do have obscure stuff like a Taurus PT145 with a manual safety and a super long trigger pull. None the less my figure is that if I teach myself to disengage the safety or try to before shooting anything it solves the problem. IE If I'm shooting my PF9 under stress I try and reach for a safety, if one isn't present then I of course don't hit anything and still can shoot. Same goes for the majority of my guns, now that said I pretty much never actually do that reach, since most of the time I've got the time between realizing I need to draw my gun and trying to fire to realize "hey I'm shooting my PF9 and I now know the whole of the action and mechanism".

    The closest situations I've had are shooting critters when they are running and I've got a window of opportunity to shoot them IE usually squirrels, skunks, etc. In those cases I've used just about every gun in my collection and I've never had a situation where I've had a problem say forgetting to disengage the safety on my 1911's or anything of the sort. Honestly never really noticed the difference in triggers that much on the first round, second etc maybe but it's slight. I think there is something to be said for being familiar with the gun, putting allot of rounds down range and practicing with it that will seriously help to be able to switch platforms.

    Also I think there is a personality component to this as well, most guys on this forum are what people would say are pretty serious gun guys. For less serious gun guys it's going to be that much more difficult to switch platforms because they're familiarity with a single firearm is very limited let alone many. As an example I've taken allot of guys shooting over the years, and often times they are far less experiences shooting handguns than they had let on. Sometimes they are blunt and say they don't know this or that or have never shot a handgun. Either way when they say yeah I own a 1911 or carry a 1911 and that's what I shoot. I've seen the same guys struggle to realize why the gun didn't go bang, only to realize the safety is on. This isn't an unfamiliar platform in that sense, but they themselves are gun guys so to speak. They don't spend hours on forums and the range learning the ins and outs of a particular gun before buying it. And they haven't spent hundreds or thousands of hours with that gun in their hands over the years. So those guys are different, and I'm not disparaging them they have other interests and priorities that don't include as heavy of a dose of firearms as I do.

    In the same thought there are parts of firearms I'm in that boat, if I'm honest high end collectable shotguns not my thing. Can't afford it and it doesn't strike my interest, as such I know very very little about them. It's just not important to me, the same way handguns and manual of arms for various guns aren't important to them. So there is a personality element in my opinion, and a purpose. If your purpose for say owning a 1911 is to plink at the range, well forgetting about the safety being there on the first round isn't a big deal. If your purpose is carrying that gun for your safety and your family, I think it's prudent to spend more time understanding how it works, and learning to use it well.

    Luke
    MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

    ZeroTA

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #6 on: February 22, 2017, 05:30:34 PM »
    I don't see an issue if you're willing to train with both. Once you've developed muscle memory with both, it's not a problem. Your brain can switch back and forth.
    I'm not saying you should use an M1A for home defense, but I'm also not saying you shouldn't.

    tokugawa

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #7 on: February 22, 2017, 06:17:08 PM »
    Your results may vary-
     Running a IPSC course for fun (I was never a serious competitor) I had a hard time switching from a P7 to a 1911.  It is not just the squeeze cocker, or the safety on one and not the other, or that one has a slide release on the frame and the other has it built into the squeeze cocker, or the mag button on the side vs on the heel of the grip, or the different feel of the weapon in the hand- but taken all together, it was not a smooth transition at all.

     My take- with all the variability's we cannot control, does it not make sense to eliminate the few we can control?

    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #8 on: February 22, 2017, 06:30:46 PM »
    I would say from a practical standpoint you're absolutely correct if we want the best performance lacking a better term 100% of the time sticking with the same gun would be the ideal, or slightly lesser the same platform. For myself and again just my 2 cents not talking for anyone else here. For myself I honestly prefer some variety not for any practical reason typically. Some days I wake up and I just want to carry a wheel gun, knowing that I'm not as good of a shot with a wheelgun nor as fast reloading, not have as much ammo on tap. Sometimes there are practical reasons like method of dress or weight that will play a role, sometimes purely time. For instance if my back hurts because I did something stupid I'll often decide to carry a lighter gun which means for me either my Taurus 445 Ti, my PF9, or maybe my P3AT rather than a heavier steel framed gun. But really that's much less often than the need to conceal in some clothing that is less than ideal like dress clothing for church. Sometimes in those cases I'll drop down to the PF9, though more often than not I'll run something like my 3.5in 1911 or Combat Master in those cases too.

    I will say though more so than the gun itself I find position and style of holster to have a much more direct impact on my ability to draw and fire. For instance going to a shoulder rig is super weird for me, though I use them from time to time. When we traveled and I carried in a shoulder rig, I'd also carry a belt rig with a backup or primary gun depending on how you looked at it. Mostly because I knew under stress I always seemed to go for the belt first, whether there was a gun there or not. To a certain degree this effects appendix and crossdraw in the same way. Appendix I don't carry a gun immediately behind it, but with crossdraw I always carry a primary side holster as well. And maybe I'm just weird that way;) I'm sure I could over time train myself out of it, especially if I found myself carrying in a non standard position daily etc. But as it stands that upsets my mojo more than what gun happens to be in the holster. I can typically switch without much issues with IWB/OWB rigs in the same position and various styles of rigs in the same basic position. But if I fiddle too much with cant, and position it does throw me off a fair bit.

    Luke
    MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

    coelacanth

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #9 on: February 22, 2017, 07:56:52 PM »
    If you can't walk and chew gum at the same time you should probably forego carrying any firearm at all.    :coffee    Does you family own more than one kind of vehicle?  Do you drive all of them?  Seems to me that switching from an F-150 to a Harley Davidson Road King is at least as big a difference as switching from one handgun to another.  God forbid that you should climb aboard the John Deere combine and run it down the road to the other field.   :facepalm   
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #10 on: February 22, 2017, 08:03:04 PM »
    I really can't argue that point.  I carry a 1911 (a full-size custom, or a Pro Carry that you've all seen here before)in an IWB,  or, if The Boss is feeling benevolent, a 4-inch Security Six in a Bianchi X-15 shoulder rig, or a Ruger Vaquero, birdshead version, in a crossdraw holster.

    To date, in over 40 years of CCW, I've drawn exactly one firearm, one time.  It was the Vaquero.  It worked.  No shots fired, nobody got hurt, and other than one LEO who wanted to be an ass, no issues.
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    tokugawa

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #11 on: February 23, 2017, 07:11:46 AM »
    If you can't walk and chew gum at the same time you should probably forego carrying any firearm at all.    :coffee    Does you family own more than one kind of vehicle?  Do you drive all of them?  Seems to me that switching from an F-150 to a Harley Davidson Road King is at least as big a difference as switching from one handgun to another.  God forbid that you should climb aboard the John Deere combine and run it down the road to the other field.   :facepalm   

      Sounds obvious and simple-
      but I think there are factors you may be missing. A definitive shift from obviously different items (a pickup truck to a motorcycle) will key in a whole different set of responses.  But from one car to another, or one motorcycle to another, yes, there can be problems and there has been an effort to standardize controls. - for example, left side shifting was made mandatory on bikes. Go ride that Harley and then jump on a 60's brit bike and see if that right side, one up, three down shift pattern and left side brake does not give a bit of confusion. :)
      Most modern cars have controls much like each other, designed that way for a reason.  Power, prop and carb heat share distinctive odd shaped knobs for identification across many different aircraft.   
     
     I am not talking about a range trip here, but an encounter that is going to involve a massive stress load. People don't work smooth under stress. Even simple things get difficult. I never had the slightest bit of trouble running that P7 and 1911 at the range- only when the time stress of competition was introduced did the problems show up. And they were not huge-half a second wondering why the mag would not drop, but when under attack it would have been a big deal.
     There is going to be a familiarization time with any new object- so once a year switching guns is probably not too bad,as that time overall is relatively low- but switching out on a day to day basis makes the adjustment time ever present.
      The counter argument is people are so familiar with their firearms they do not need an adjustment period-
     add stress to that, and things can change.  One reason old guys are conservative (not in a political sense) is that we have seen how many flavors of mistakes there are.

    armoredman

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #12 on: February 23, 2017, 12:50:34 PM »
    I will carry different sidearms at times for CCW use, but they all have the same basic function, no positive safeties to wipe off, acquire, sight picture, squeeze, etc.

    cpaspr

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #13 on: February 23, 2017, 05:20:08 PM »
    I'm with Armoredman.  No external safeties in use on any of my carry guns.  The only one with an external safety (not currently in rotation) is a Ruger SR9c, and when carried will be carried with the safety off.  And that's not any more dangerous than a Glock.  The only differences between them all are capacity and how the reload works.
    Oregon

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #14 on: February 23, 2017, 07:06:32 PM »
    If it comes from behind my left hipbone, it's a 1911 with a manual safety.  If it comes from my right armpit, it's a D/A .357.  If it comes from in front of my right hipbone, it's a S/A .45 Colt.  For me, it's more about remembering where the gun is than how to run it if I need it. 
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    Grant

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #15 on: February 23, 2017, 07:07:36 PM »
       I switch carry guns to a point.      All of my stuff is DA/SA however with the exception of my 1911.  So same basic function.

        As someone who uses and carries a lot of guns at various times, I'm not worried about changover.   Casual shooters, or people who are "gun people" but carry a different one every day, yet never get range time?   Yes, I believe that could be a problem.

     
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    Robinson

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #16 on: February 23, 2017, 10:48:48 PM »
    Any time I hear/read the term "carry rotation" I wonder what the point of it is.  I think there is a lot to be said for focusing on a single handgun -- devoting your training time to it and being as proficient with it as you can.  That is not to say you should never switch but rotating guns for kicks does not appeal to me.

    I would even go further to say it's a good idea to have multiple copies of your carry gun -- one to be your primary carry, another to be a dedicated training gun and perhaps a third to act as a backup in case one of the others needs to be repaired for example.

    When it comes to method and position of carry, I think the optimal choice is to use the method and position you do your dry practice with.  Repetition of proper technique builds proficiency.  Unless of course a person doesn't dry practice from the holster, then I guess the point is moot.

    But if a person wants to change things up due to boredom that's their choice.
    Georgia

    MTK20

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #17 on: February 23, 2017, 11:36:42 PM »
    I typically carry non-external safety guns: revolvers, Glock, Sig Sauer, etc.

    I like Clint Smith's philosophy, though. Perhaps carrying multiple guns, as long as one is familiar with them, is part of becoming accustomed to multiple weapons systems?

    I know the argument has typically been against safety, but maybe familiarising one's self with multiple platforms enhances safety? Even in the hand, without looking, there is night and day difference between the feel and balance of my handguns.

    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    tokugawa

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #18 on: February 24, 2017, 12:14:07 AM »
    This is not a combat in Fallujah scenario. Yet....
     
      Lets talk about something simple. How easy to mix up two guns, identical in every respect, except one has a DA-SA system and the other a decocker? 

     IMO, the whole "carry rotation" is just a style thing, like a new watch or handbag.  Lot's of excellent excuses and rationalizations, but when it come down to it, it is just playing with guns.  (Tok quickly dons his armor and jumps in the nearest trench.) :)

    Robinson

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #19 on: February 24, 2017, 12:16:53 AM »
    I'm not sure Mr. Smith is advocating carrying multiple types so much as advocating familiarizing yourself with them in case you are presented with a situation requiring their use.  I carry a Lightweight Commander 9mm, but I sometimes rent other types at the range such as a Glock 17 or a Sig, whatever -- just to get some trigger and handling time with them.  But I focus on training with my carry gun or one very much like it.

    But I am not an expert and I'm simply explaining what works best for me.
    Georgia

    coelacanth

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #20 on: February 24, 2017, 12:32:22 AM »
       I switch carry guns to a point.      All of my stuff is DA/SA however with the exception of my 1911.  So same basic function.

        As someone who uses and carries a lot of guns at various times, I'm not worried about changover.   Casual shooters, or people who are "gun people" but carry a different one every day, yet never get range time?   Yes, I believe that could be a problem.

     
    I would agree up to a point but what you are describing is more a lack of general proficiency than the idea that you can't successfully switch from one manual of arms to another when the chips are down.  I have been carrying and using S&W double action revolvers and 1911 pattern pistols for the better part of the last forty years as well as bolt and lever action rifles and various shotguns both in the field after game and as personal defense weapons.  You may outdraw me and you may outshoot me but it isn't because I lack the proficiency to operate the weapon or the presence of mind to know the business at hand.


      Sounds obvious and simple-
      but I think there are factors you may be missing. A definitive shift from obviously different items (a pickup truck to a motorcycle) will key in a whole different set of responses.  But from one car to another, or one motorcycle to another, yes, there can be problems and there has been an effort to standardize controls. - for example, left side shifting was made mandatory on bikes. Go ride that Harley and then jump on a 60's brit bike and see if that right side, one up, three down shift pattern and left side brake does not give a bit of confusion. :)
      Most modern cars have controls much like each other, designed that way for a reason.  Power, prop and carb heat share distinctive odd shaped knobs for identification across many different aircraft.   
     
     I am not talking about a range trip here, but an encounter that is going to involve a massive stress load. People don't work smooth under stress. Even simple things get difficult. I never had the slightest bit of trouble running that P7 and 1911 at the range- only when the time stress of competition was introduced did the problems show up. And they were not huge-half a second wondering why the mag would not drop, but when under attack it would have been a big deal.
     There is going to be a familiarization time with any new object- so once a year switching guns is probably not too bad,as that time overall is relatively low- but switching out on a day to day basis makes the adjustment time ever present.
      The counter argument is people are so familiar with their firearms they do not need an adjustment period-
     add stress to that, and things can change.  One reason old guys are conservative (not in a political sense) is that we have seen how many flavors of mistakes there are.

    I think it is pretty obvious and it is fairly simple.  While it is true that none of us may operate in the manner we hoped for in an emergency, we are all the culmination of or experiences at the moment of truth.  We do our best and let the chips fall where they may.

     I chose the analogy of operating a motorized vehicle on a public highway because that is one thing that nearly all of us do nearly every day that puts us in a potentially life threatening circumstance with other people who are similarly equipped.  A potential accident situation can develop very, very quickly and usually without much warning.  As in a personal defense scenario, situational awareness is the key and proficiency - yes, even expertise may be the difference between surviving the situation and not doing so.  Experience and judgement are also things we all possess to varying degrees and will factor into the outcome as well.  You may be licensed and insured for the operation of everything from a moped to a tandem trailer eighteen wheeler and you are expected to do so in a manner that does not endanger yourself or others on the public streets and highways.  The fact that we, for the most part, are able to do so argues in favor of the ability to master more than one system.  I am personally acquainted with two pilots who simultaneously maintain both fixed wing and rotary wing ratings.   :hmm

    I agree that situational stress is a complicating factor but as I said before, experience and judgement are going to play their part as well.  I don't go armed and in harm's way as a profession but if I did I would be expected to be proficient with both handguns and long arms as well as my chosen back-up weapon in the course of my duties. Simplifying the process can help to a degree but I still maintain that if you are not capable of proficiency you may be in the wrong line of work.  There are, in fact, people who should not carry firearms or even sharp objects on their person.  I may be one of them someday but thankfully today is not that day. 

    For the record, the F -150, the Harley Davidson, the John Deere combine, a GMC two ton truck with a split axle, two different farm tractors, various and sundry implements from plows and cultivators to planters and mowing equipment, were all things I was simultaneously proficient at operating.  Later I added a Triumph motorcycle, a backhoe and end loader, and a second pick-up truck with a three speed column shift.  All  were driven regularly or required to be moved on public highways between two farms in the area.  I am not bragging - simply pointing out that although the controls were different the operating principles remained the same.  Shiny side up - keep it between the ditches - don't run into things. 

    I can't say what works or doesn't work for you, only how I approach the situation.
    « Last Edit: February 24, 2017, 12:42:32 AM by coelacanth »
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
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    Grant

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #21 on: February 24, 2017, 08:37:38 AM »
    I would agree up to a point but what you are describing is more a lack of general proficiency than the idea that you can't successfully switch from one manual of arms to another when the chips are down.  I have been carrying and using S&W double action revolvers and 1911 pattern pistols for the better part of the last forty years as well as bolt and lever action rifles and various shotguns both in the field after game and as personal defense weapons.  You may outdraw me and you may outshoot me but it isn't because I lack the proficiency to operate the weapon or the presence of mind to know the business at hand.

    I guess that's the thing:    I think only in two instances would someone ever "become dead" over changing a manual of arms.
    #1.  A new shooter or low-round-count shooter who doesn't practice enough.
    #2. A non-gun person such as a experienced/good Police officer, or a person who has championed his whole to being a one-gun shooter to become super proficient.     They've spent their whole life with ONE handgun.

        Other than that, I believe what minor slowdowns there are in say pulling a striker fire trigger instead of a DA/SA, are NOT factors or times/speeds large enough to cause a gunfight to go the wrong way.

       
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    LowKey

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #22 on: February 24, 2017, 09:13:17 AM »
    Some people may rotate pistols for fashion reasons/boredom, but others will swap them out due to the type of concealment garments worn especially when due to seasonal changes of wardrobe.   Easy to hide a big pistol when you're wearing a heavy coat but more difficult when wearing shorts and a t-shirt at the 4th of July BBQ.


    I think more people are likely to have problems due to a lack of realistic practice drawing from concealment than from swapping back and forth between a limited selection of pistols.      Probably a good idea to spend and hour or two at the range after swapping just to recalibrate. 

    Also, I doubt the revolver guys will have any real problems no matter what revolver ends up in their hand. 


    tokugawa

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #23 on: February 24, 2017, 06:57:52 PM »
    I would agree up to a point but what you are describing is more a lack of general proficiency than the idea that you can't successfully switch from one manual of arms to another when the chips are down.  I have been carrying and using S&W double action revolvers and 1911 pattern pistols for the better part of the last forty years as well as bolt and lever action rifles and various shotguns both in the field after game and as personal defense weapons.  You may outdraw me and you may outshoot me but it isn't because I lack the proficiency to operate the weapon or the presence of mind to know the business at hand.
    I think it is pretty obvious and it is fairly simple.  While it is true that none of us may operate in the manner we hoped for in an emergency, we are all the culmination of or experiences at the moment of truth.  We do our best and let the chips fall where they may.

     I chose the analogy of operating a motorized vehicle on a public highway because that is one thing that nearly all of us do nearly every day that puts us in a potentially life threatening circumstance with other people who are similarly equipped.  A potential accident situation can develop very, very quickly and usually without much warning.  As in a personal defense scenario, situational awareness is the key and proficiency - yes, even expertise may be the difference between surviving the situation and not doing so.  Experience and judgement are also things we all possess to varying degrees and will factor into the outcome as well.  You may be licensed and insured for the operation of everything from a moped to a tandem trailer eighteen wheeler and you are expected to do so in a manner that does not endanger yourself or others on the public streets and highways.  The fact that we, for the most part, are able to do so argues in favor of the ability to master more than one system.  I am personally acquainted with two pilots who simultaneously maintain both fixed wing and rotary wing ratings.   :hmm

    I agree that situational stress is a complicating factor but as I said before, experience and judgement are going to play their part as well.  I don't go armed and in harm's way as a profession but if I did I would be expected to be proficient with both handguns and long arms as well as my chosen back-up weapon in the course of my duties. Simplifying the process can help to a degree but I still maintain that if you are not capable of proficiency you may be in the wrong line of work.  There are, in fact, people who should not carry firearms or even sharp objects on their person.  I may be one of them someday but thankfully today is not that day. 

    For the record, the F -150, the Harley Davidson, the John Deere combine, a GMC two ton truck with a split axle, two different farm tractors, various and sundry implements from plows and cultivators to planters and mowing equipment, were all things I was simultaneously proficient at operating.  Later I added a Triumph motorcycle, a backhoe and end loader, and a second pick-up truck with a three speed column shift.  All  were driven regularly or required to be moved on public highways between two farms in the area.  I am not bragging - simply pointing out that although the controls were different the operating principles remained the same.  Shiny side up - keep it between the ditches - don't run into things. 

    I can't say what works or doesn't work for you, only how I approach the situation.
     
      It is not the diversity of machinery, but the similarity that I see as a disadvantage.  No one will confuse a combine with a car.  Nor the collective with a yoke. But one might be disoriented under stress between two things very similar, yet different in operation.  Each to their own.

    cpaspr

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    Re: CCW and Changing Platforms.
    « Reply #24 on: February 24, 2017, 09:35:34 PM »
    Any time I hear/read the term "carry rotation" I wonder what the point of it is.  <snip>

    Sometimes there might be a snubnosed revolver in my pocket, because that's all I can conceal in the attire I wear at work.  Outside of work, if I'm able to dress differently, such that I have the ability to carry a semi-auto with more capacity, then I'll carry that.  Carry rotation isn't necessarily "I'm tired of carrying that, I think I'll carry this instead."; it's more a selection that I'm familiar with, have acquired sufficient proficiency with, and am able to conceal with what I'm wearing today.  Some are larger, some smaller, and the choice of which is often dictated by the clothes.  Basically, I'll carry the most capacity that will conceal well with what I'm wearing.
    Oregon

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