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Author Topic: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective  (Read 2035 times)

coelacanth

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Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2017, 07:24:42 PM »
Yeah, Beretta was actually importing the BM 59 variant.  Those were some cool rifles but a little bit on the overkill side for an urban PD at the time.  This was the era before "SWAT" became a thing. 
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    Penguin

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #26 on: February 22, 2017, 07:49:09 PM »
    The M-14 was available,  if somewhat pricey.    Browning also imported Belgian produced FAL's starting in the 1960's.  You might have had trouble finding an inch pattern gun though. 
    That's about what I figured. The metric guns just aren't for me. They just don't feel right.  Same with AR-15. I don't know what it is I always wanted to like the FAL but it just never felt right until I came across my fist L1A1. Now I can't seem to get enough of them.
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    ksuguy

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #27 on: February 22, 2017, 08:04:52 PM »
    Never really made much of a difference to me.  I do prefer the bigger lug on the inch magazines and the folding cocking handle is nice.   However,  other than that there isn't much difference. 

    Kansas

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #28 on: February 22, 2017, 08:31:00 PM »
    I'd have to go with a Colt Combat Commander (or two) in shoulder rigs.  A New York reload is tons faster than any kind of tactical reload, with or without retention.  If restricted to revolvers, I'd go with two Ruger Speed-Six's with 3-4 inch barrels.

    A Tankerized Garand would do for a serious rifle, with or without the M-14 magazine modification.  En bloc clips are cheap, and easy to keep running.  Would prefer the original .30-06, but wouldn't feel cheated if they were .308 Win.

    A Model 12 Winchester, with a 20-inch tube and a full length mag.  Although, I'd settle for the M-97 "trench broom" that grandpa kept behind the kitchen door.

    And the smallest Seecamp available in an ankle holster, just in case it all went south.
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    stephendutton

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #29 on: February 23, 2017, 02:52:37 AM »
    Would 7.62x39mm ammo have been available in the US at this time? Perhaps a 70s detective could keep an SKS brought back from Vietnam in the back of his car.
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    Langenator

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #30 on: February 23, 2017, 08:21:01 AM »
    Would 7.62x39mm ammo have been available in the US at this time? Perhaps a 70s detective could keep an SKS brought back from Vietnam in the back of his car.

    Maybe a Garand in the trunk of his Grand Torino?

    I would say that there's a better than even chance that your 70s detective is a veteran of military service in the 60s.  Maybe Vietnam, or maybe being an MP at a base in the Deep South (say, Ft Benning, GA or Ft McClellan, AL) which might give him an interesting view on the Civil Rights movement.
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    GaBoy45

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #31 on: February 23, 2017, 02:10:53 PM »
    Had to think on this one...I'd probably roll with a slicked up S&W Model 24 4" loaded with lead wadcutters backwards. Most likely would have a bobbed Detective Special in an ankle holster with a Charter Arms bulldog in an offside rig. Long guns would probably be a shortened rifle sighted Ithaca 37 and an M1 carbine gunsmithed to feed soft point ammo. I think Jim Cirillo and the Stakeout Squad had a good handle on firepower for an urban setting.


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    Grant

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    Re: Arm Yourself: 70s Detective
    « Reply #32 on: February 23, 2017, 08:16:50 PM »
       I think I'd have to pick two: Mainly "because I could".

         I think my primary day to day would be a good solid 4" Ruger Security Six.     As strong as a S&W N-frame with the size of an L-frame.   For off-duty carry a 2.75" snubnose version would be carried often (What I carry right now as a matter of fact).       Both would be loaded with the good ol' fashioned Remington 125 SJHP "manstopper".   I believe that load was first introduced in the very early 1970's?  And could use issued .38 ammo in a pinch.        Backup would probably be a 5 shot smith airweight.

        I think depending on how well it performed and I liked it, I'd pick a Colt 1911, not real picky on the exact model as long as it functioned and shot well with the good ol 200 grain Flying Ashtray from speer.

           Sitting in the trunk of my car would be a Armalite 180 (heck, why not an AR180-full auto even?) High capacity, available to civilians for years with a lot of firepower, plus a folding stock and option for an optic.   

          For a shotgun I think I'd go with an old school Winchester '97, as I like open loading gates, and at that time, MOST had "covered" loading gates in those ol' days.

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