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Author Topic: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?  (Read 5266 times)

THE NORSEMAN

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Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« on: December 26, 2009, 11:42:26 AM »
Ol' Norse here had a disappointing day yesterday.  Took my 700 BDL 30-06 to the range.  Trouble ensued.

1.  About 1/3rd of the time it would not cock when putting the bolt handle down.

2.  Trigger pull was very inconsistent.  Sometimes the 4 pounds I was used to, sometimes as high as a horrid DA revolver pull.

3.  Once, when I put the bolt down it went off as I closed it. :o  That scared me good.  The rules were followed though, so the bullet actually hit the paper target(though nowhere near center).

My theory is due to the temperatures I was in(well below zero) that the factory grease is just to thick and the sear was hanging up in the action slot, since this morning sitting here in my front room it's working flawlessly.  So I figure I'll tear the bolt apart and lube it with a little better lube, then try again.

EDIT:  Tore it down.  Holy heavens they use some thick stuff from the factory.  Changed out to Berryhills Gun Goo(don't have any slipstream to try yet).  But my big problem was the trigger group.  What was Remington thinking?  Grease?  Lots of it on everything in the trigger group.  Gads.  Cleaned up, oiled properly(very sparingly with a couple drops of a light oil), and reassembled.  Trigger pull is much improved in weight, feel, and consistency.  

Given the temps I was in and the symptoms I was having and highly greased condition of the gun I think it was the sear sticking intermittently, as I got a surprising amount of thick dirty grease out of there when I cleaned it.

Will retest and report next weekend if the temps stay down low enough.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2009, 02:17:29 PM by THE NORSEMAN »
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Gundoc

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2009, 08:26:33 PM »
If you had a ton of sticky nasty grease in the firing pin channel it is possible for it to harden enough to make the firing pin stick. That grease would have to be pretty darn hard because that firing pin spring is quite a heavy spring. Check out George's latest video. Hea has the Mossburg 930 out that has been frozen in the snow bank for the last week. It had been lubed up with Slipstream before it was frozen, was still frozen when he shot it and said it functioned flawlessly. You don't have to worry about the active ingredient in Slipstream until it is below -450 F. So I don't think you'll have any problems with it either. The base grease or oil may thicken with the cold but the stuff doing all the work won't let it stick together enough to become a block.

JesseL

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2009, 08:43:10 PM »
Is it a good idea to have the trigger assembly on a bolt action lubed at all?
Arizona

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2009, 09:14:59 PM »

This Mossberg 930 SPX was under snow for about 2 weeks.  Outside, bitter cold temperatures.  I dug it out, threw it into the back of my truck where it stayed until we got to the range.  The 930 was lubed with Slipstream Oil prior to this.   The shotgun ran FLAWLESSLY, even though it was literally too cold to touch with bare hands.   
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GeorgeHill

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2009, 09:16:53 PM »
Is it a good idea to have the trigger assembly on a bolt action lubed at all?
Yes.  Bare metal will freeze together and lock a gun up tight. 
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THE NORSEMAN

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2009, 10:17:34 PM »
Trigger groups just need a very light touch of lightweight lube on the moving parts.  Did I say VERY light?  Almost unnoticeable.  What I had was a light grease all over it from the factory.  When I bedded the rifle right after I got it, I ass/u/med it wasn't lubed excessively.  My bad there.  It was factory lubed with a grease that is apparently very unhappy and immobile below zero.  That explains the inconsistent trigger pull and the safety being a bit sticky.  For now, until I can do it 100 percent properly, I hosed the trigger group out with Hornady 1 shot, and used literally a single drop of synthetic ATF on the end of a paperclip spread out over all the moving parts, pins and friction points in the trigger group.  You should have seen how much grease Remington had in there that wasn't externally visible.  :o   As noted above, trigger pull is much improved.  Very crisp and predictable vs. what it was previously.

With that same lube in the slot the sear moves in in the bottom rear of the action?  You would not have believed how much nastiness came out of there!  I have no doubt now that it was sticking intermittently, which explains the non-cocking, and sticking mid way or so in travel would explain the firing when closing the bolt.  I also note that cycling the bolt now feels much more positive and solid, where before it was kind of mushy.  

All the above is most likely true, but still only a thesis until I can get out at sunrise next weekend when it's hopefully cold as the north pole to try it out.
This may be considered as the true palladium of liberty...
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LittleLebowski

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2009, 01:15:26 PM »
  I think your reasoning is sound.  I also agree with GD in that the firing pin probably stuck due to cold grease and caused your AD. 

  I have not tried Slipstream grease in temps below about 30 degrees but I would probably use light touches of that on the trigger mechanism and leave the firing pin dry or with a bare bit of oil, spread on with a paintbrush or fingertip.


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GeorgeHill

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Re: Remington 700 bolt disassembly and operation?
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2009, 01:28:15 PM »
Fingertip works just fine.  See, that's the great thing about Slipstream... you don't need much.
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