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Author Topic: Thinking about Arizona  (Read 2443 times)

Bud

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Thinking about Arizona
« on: January 22, 2017, 12:49:37 PM »
Mary and I are thinking about buying some land in Arizona. It's primary purpose would be a place to visit several times a year using our motor home for a residence. So, water is the immediate problem. I don't think pure desert would be desirable, maybe foothills.

My brother lives in Maricopa in Pinal County but I suspect that area would be too expensive. Looking for some acreage.

Thoughts? Ideas? Recommendations?
MissouriBud
Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

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    Grant

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #1 on: January 22, 2017, 01:11:17 PM »
      Just outta curiosity: Any particular reason Arizona in particular?    Climate?  visiting in winter months?

       I ask because though Montana doesn't care for out of staters  ;)   Y'all are good folk, and as long as it isn't wintertime, stuff's cheaper than other states, we're not quite as hot, and a lot wider variety of scenery.

     
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    Bud

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #2 on: January 22, 2017, 01:47:11 PM »
    I have had so many orthopedic injuries that a really cold winter really cripples me up. Mary is fast catching up. She broke an ankle a year and a half ago and i broke a lef just one year ago (to stay ahead in the broken bone, my cast is bigger than yours sweepstakes)

    But, you brought up a good point because we both love Montana and Wyoming. Maybe we should discuss this more.

    I have both a straw and a felt western hat so we could go either direction and fit right in.
    MissouriBud
    Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

    ksuguy

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #3 on: January 22, 2017, 02:52:00 PM »
    My grandparents used to spend the winters in Yuma.  They would take the RV down there and park it on a lot with hookups for several months out of the year.   They had a cheap compact car that they would leave down there and use as transportation since it wasn't practical to drive the big RV hauling truck around. 

    It was nice enough place,  and there is an excellent public range outside of town called Adair park.  They have multiple ranges there, my favorite is the 500 meter metallic silohuette range.   It's also a short trip to Los Algodones across the border,  so a lot of people go over there to pick up medication cheap.

    The downside is that because it is nice,  the area is completely overrun by snowbirds for half the year.  That really drove up the prices on lots in town.    However, many people have lots available for rent.   I'd suggest looking into that,  then you can rent one for a couple of months and see how you like it.    Then if it works out, you can look at something more permanent.   
    Kansas

    Bud

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #4 on: January 22, 2017, 04:58:38 PM »
    We have been to AZ several times and already know that we like it. At my age, it would probably be better to buy something now, rather than later<GRIN>
    MissouriBud
    Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

    ksuguy

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #5 on: January 22, 2017, 05:10:57 PM »
    It would probably depend on how often you were going to be there to determine what was most cost effective.  Due to the number of snowbirds buying RV lots,  the price is outrageous.   You'd probably end up spending $40k to get a lot, and that's wedged into one of the foothills developments with everyone else.

    On the other hand, if you could rent the same lot for a few hundred bucks a month and were only going to be there two or three months a year, it might be better.   Of course you could always buy the lot and resell it or rent it out later assuming the demand for real estate down there doesn't detonate in the next few years.   
    Kansas

    Bud

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #6 on: January 22, 2017, 10:42:21 PM »
    we're actually going to look for some acreage
    MissouriBud
    Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

    ksuguy

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #7 on: January 22, 2017, 10:54:49 PM »
    If you can afford it, that's the best way to go.   You might be able to find something reasonably priced outside of town.  The downside of course is that you won't have city water and power, but there are ways of dealing with that.

    I'm somewhat spoiled by Kansas real estate prices (and my inherent cheapness), I see just about everywhere else as "too expensive".
    Kansas

    coelacanth

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #8 on: January 22, 2017, 11:40:06 PM »
    If you're just looking to get away to somewhere warm and sunny for part of the winter, then the desert is exactly where you'd want to be.  If you're going to also use it as a summertime getaway spot then its a little rough to handle the low deserts in an RV unless you have some fairly good shade.  Have you considered renting in some of the thousands of RV parks scattered across the state?  Renting first might let you explore a few different areas before making a final decision about where to buy.  It also has the advantage of having power, water and sewage dump facilities that can make your stay a little more enjoyable - if a bit more pricey as well.  Boondocking can be a lot of fun but it really helps to know the area before you try it. 

    There is a lot of variation in the climate and terrain of Arizona depending on where you are.  Flagstaff, on I-40 is at 7000' above sea level and the mountains in the area would be considered sub alpine terrain.   This week they have gotten over two feet of snow in town and are expecting more tomorrow.  The nearby mountains will have snow pack that measures up to eight feet in places by the end of winter and some will last until nearly June before it melts completely.  The air is thin, the days are warm to hot and the nights are cool to frigid depending on the time of year and prevailing weather. 

    A two hour drive south on I-17 will put you in Phoenix and one of the most popular snow bird havens on earth.  At 1200' above sea level it is in the northernmost extent of the great Sonoran desert.  This week Phoenix is experiencing intermittent rain showers and high temps in the upper 50's to low 60's and nighttime lows in the upper 30's to low 40's.  All the natives are bundled up in extreme cold weather gear and all the Canadians are at Walgreen's buying sun tan lotion and beach towels.   :facepalm   

    A two hour or so drive west of Flagstaff on I-40 will put you in Kingman.  Its an interesting little town that kind of splits the difference between Flagstaff and Phoenix in terms of climate and terrain.  It is in the easternmost extent of the great Mohave desert and is fairly close to the Colorado river valley.  Smaller even than Flagstaff and way smaller than Phoenix, it can be explored in its entirety in a day.  It is conveniently close to the Grand Canyon, the Colorado river and even Las Vegas, Nevada is fairly close as well. 

    The nice thing about towns along I-40 is that they are pretty convenient for folks traveling west from Missouri.  If you jog south and pick up I-10, you'll run through the southern part of the state through places like Willcox, Benson, Tucson and Phoenix.  The climate and terrain are quite a bit different from the northern part of the state and more enjoyable during the cooler months of the year. 

    Any of those places mentioned will have numerous RV parks where space can be rented for a day or a week or a month if necessary.  That's not to say that you wouldn't want to buy land there but there's a hell of a lot of Arizona to see and if you just pick a spot at random or because somebody else recommended it you may well miss out on something that suits you better.  Some folks are temperature sensitive - others are not well suited to high altitudes - others still may have adverse allergic reactions to some of our desert flora and fauna.  Its a good idea to poke around a bit before making a final decision about where to set up housekeeping.  God knows, there's plenty of options.

    If you do decide to try boondocking in your RV get yourself some good maps - not only of the roads but also topographic maps.  They will prove helpful in avoiding places you ought not to park.  That dry wash you drove across a mile or so back might keep you from crossing back over it for a week or more if a big storm or series of them comes through.  Ask me how I know.   :facepalm

    As far as buying land is concerned, anything worth having is going to be fairly expensive.  Most of Arizona is federally owned land so the private land we do have is not cheap.  Anything with readily available water is more expensive still.  That's not to say you can't find something worth having at a price you can afford but I wouldn't expect to find it on your first day looking. 

    Places you might not have heard of but could be worthy of consideration:  Safford, Benson, Sierra Vista, Patagonia, St. John's, Springerville, Clint's Well, Payson, Star Valley, Cottonwood, Chino Valley, Parker, Kingman, Fredonia, Page, Casa Grande .    That's not a full listing but they are scattered all around the state and I have spent time in them all and found them all to be pleasant in their own way. 

    Let me know if you have more specific questions. 


    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

    armoredman

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #9 on: January 22, 2017, 11:52:13 PM »
    Maricopa is an itty bitty place, shouldn't be that expensive. Casa Grande is growing all over the place, lots of room, free 300 yard range just south of town, also a members only trap club that has RV parking.
    Please, please, PLEASE just do ONE thing if you come down here....just one, tiny, microscopic little thing...


    DRIVE THE SPEED LIMIT!!!!

    I'm sorry, but I was born and raised in AZ, and the one thing the snowbirds bring besides welcome tourism, is traffic jams and slow driving. I have been stuck behind motorhomes going 20 miles under the limit while trying to get to work, and it gets very old after a while.

    AZ is a great place for firearms owners, and we welcome everyone of you with open arms. Lots of neat places in the Valley to see, great eateries from Haus Murphy's to Long Wangs, (not a joke!), to Fibber McGees and Chompies, and interesting places to see like the International Musical Instrument Museum, (you have no idea, the place is gigantic and will blow your mind), not to mention the great ranges like Rio Salad and Ben Avery. :)

    RetroGrouch

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #10 on: January 23, 2017, 02:18:07 AM »
    Yes, please drive the speed limit.  Faster if you are in the fast lane.  Use a GPS to figure out where you are going, preferably in advance.  It will help with going the speed limit.  Most of us came here from someplace where it rains or snows, sometimes at the same time, so if the roads aren't flooding, let's all drive like rain isn't an ice storm.


    I agree with checking out the various parts of the state, as one of the reasons I love it here is there are so many different climates and things to see & do.
    Arizona

    Bud

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #11 on: January 23, 2017, 10:58:29 AM »
    I pretty much exceed the speed limits except here in Missouri and neighboring Arkansas.

    That's because drivers in those two States do not have any clue on how to operate a motor vehicle. Turn signals are optional, making a right exit from the left lane is perfectly acceptable as is driving in the left at any speed you want is the right of all.

    That's because neither State has any requirement for any form of driver education. It takes, on average, four attempts for any new driver to pss the written test and an addition four attempts to pass the driving test here in Missouri.

    Want graphic proof that drivers education should be mandatory? Look at the traffic fatality rates for Missouri and Arkansas.

    I have been to Arizona a number of times. Mary and I did the western motorcycle ride in July of 2005. We went from northern Illinois to Tulsa, Albouquerque to Las Vegas, then Phoenix, Yuma, down I-8 to San Diego and then orth up the Pacific Coast Highway to I-80 in San Franscisco and then home.

    You haven't really felt heat until ride a bike in Arizona in July.

    My brother is in Maricopa but we both like the Prescott area so that's where we will be looking.
    We're also looking in the hill country of west Texas but over the years, we have noticed that Texas is getting really crowded.
    MissouriBud
    Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

    coyotesfan97

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #12 on: January 23, 2017, 12:13:38 PM »
    Prescott is nice but if you're looking to snowbird to avoid snow Prescott is above the snow line here. The Flastaff area about an hour north of Prescott had 24" of snow over the weekend and they're supposed to get 12-18" today. Prescott got snow but not like that.

    The Prescott area in the summer is awesome. Triple digits in Phoenix and 90s there.

    The Camp Verde area might be a place to consider.

    The Prescott gun mangler aka Jesse would definitely be the one to talk to if you're interested in land there.

    ArizonaThe bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.  Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey!  Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

    armoredman

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #13 on: January 24, 2017, 01:14:12 PM »
    Riding bikes in AZ in July? Did that for decades, bicycles as I was growing up down here. :)
    We hope you come down and enjoy your stay.

    coyotesfan97

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #14 on: January 24, 2017, 01:39:22 PM »
    Riding bikes in AZ in July? Did that for decades, bicycles as I was growing up down here. :)
    We hope you come down and enjoy your stay.

    Me too!
    ArizonaThe bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.  Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey!  Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

    Plebian

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #15 on: January 24, 2017, 04:06:27 PM »
    All I ever think about when I hear Arizona is sweating my butt off in the dead of winter in shorts and T shirt while collecting specimens. If Arizona is not hell then it is within spitting distance IMO.

    Flagstaff and Prescott area, where one of my cousins lived, is the only habitable zone in Arizona IMO.

    The biggest plus I found in the state was all the shooting locations since it was basically a desert wasteland.   
    Oklahoma"If all our problems are solved, we'll find new ones to replace them. If we can't find new ones, we'll make new ones."

    armoredman

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #16 on: January 26, 2017, 11:51:47 AM »
    Hmm...but we also have almost zero natural disasters. No tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and our last meteor strike was a few million years ago, (look up Sunset Crater), so it might be hotter several months a year, but it kinda tends to be safer. Unlike many colder states, (been there, done that, you can keep all that dadgum snow), we can also carry what we like for self defense without any state red tape. ;)
    Not sure what specimens you were collecting...we have some fine specimens of local cuisine that are excellent to collect!

    MTK20

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #17 on: January 26, 2017, 12:33:04 PM »
    Hmm...but we also have almost zero natural disasters. No tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides, and our last meteor strike was a few million years ago, (look up Sunset Crater), so it might be hotter several months a year, but it kinda tends to be safer. Unlike many colder states, (been there, done that, you can keep all that dadgum snow), we can also carry what we like for self defense without any state red tape. ;)
    Not sure what specimens you were collecting...we have some fine specimens of local cuisine that are excellent to collect!

    If your state is an oven for 11 months out of the year, can't that be considered a natural disaster?  :neener

    I keed. I keed.
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    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

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    JesseL

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #18 on: January 26, 2017, 12:51:18 PM »
    If your state is an oven for 11 months out of the year, can't that be considered a natural disaster?  :neener

    I keed. I keed.

    That's only the desert half of the state; and even then really only the Phoenix area, Yuma, and Lake Havasu City that get the truly outrageous temperatures.

    Here's downtown Prescott a couple days ago.
    Arizona

    Kaso

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #19 on: January 26, 2017, 12:57:37 PM »

    Here's downtown Prescott a couple days ago.
    You aren't exactly making a good case for the non-desert half's weather. :scrutiny
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    coyotesfan97

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #20 on: January 26, 2017, 01:48:43 PM »
    You aren't exactly making a good case for the non-desert half's weather. :scrutiny

    I think he's making the case the state isn't a sand dune infested desert waistland suitable for a Mad Max remake.  ;)
    ArizonaThe bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.  Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey!  Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

    MTK20

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #21 on: January 26, 2017, 01:52:15 PM »
    I think he's making the case the state isn't a sand dune infested desert waistland suitable for a Mad Max remake.  ;)

    Oh, good heavens! I would never say Arizona was suitable for a Mad Max remake...

    Just a Borderlands movie  :neener.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

    Paradoxically it is those who strive for self-reliance, who remain vigilant and ready to help others.

    JesseL

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #22 on: January 26, 2017, 02:02:03 PM »
    Summer  :cool
    Arizona

    Bud

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #23 on: January 26, 2017, 06:11:21 PM »
    See?

    Jesse introduced Mary and all that when we had dinner with them in 2010? 2011?

    We both think Arizona is heaven on earth. I am reading Paul Horgan's "A Distant Trumpet" right now about the Army's history in the southwest post-Civil War.
    MissouriBud
    Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death! Patrick Henry

    armoredman

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    Re: Thinking about Arizona
    « Reply #24 on: January 27, 2017, 12:52:03 AM »
    If your state is an oven for 11 months out of the year, can't that be considered a natural disaster?  :neener

    I keed. I keed.

    Thbbbpt!!   :P   Honestly, depends on your definition of oven - I was in Chicago in September with 85 degrees and 85% humidity, and I was miserable. I had just left Tucson with 105 degrees and was just fine. That was 1986, BTW, going to Boot Camp. I hate high humidity, and I've heard about places like Goergia, where you can "see the air", it's so humid. Gah.
    It's hot from May to the middle of October. The rest of the year is just fine - 80,000 agree!

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