Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.

Author Topic: Traveling to Alaska through Canada  (Read 6020 times)

Bud

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585

  • Offline
Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« on: February 03, 2010, 01:16:49 PM »
We ("Her Worship" and I) are planning the year's events and have decided driving to Alaska from northern Illinois will be the big event.

Driving to Utah and to Arizona/Texas are listed as "additional events".

Anyways, I have a CC  permit because of LEOSA of 2004. I know that matters not squat in Canada and I have also figured out that I have to drive through Canada to get to Alaska.

I have driven to Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia twice in the last few years. I have always been impresse by how friendly the Canadian Customs folks are and what stone a**holes the US Border Patrol/ICE people are.

I do not want to casually conceal my firearm and not tell the Canadians that I am carrying a pistiol and shotgun. I have been to the RCMP website and I have been learning that I can transport firearms through Canada if they are not on the restrictive or prohibative lists.

I cannot find out what is on the prohibitive or restricted lists. I would probably just take an S&W 3913 (8 shot mag) and a 5 shot 12 gauge pump.

Anybody have any expereince with this? SEANP, do you know?  Has anybody driven to Alaska lately?
Bud
I believe many of today's social ills and political party bickering could be solved by the simple implementation of legalized dueling.


g.willikers

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 804

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2010, 02:25:27 PM »
From my own outdated experiences, about the only shootin' irons they won't object to are lever action and bolt action rifles.
They didn't even like pump shotguns, for some reason.
And forget auto loaders or handguns.
But that was in the eastern parts of Canada and quite awhile ago.
Maybe the West has different rules.
Trust No One

Outbreak

  • NRA Basic Pistol Instructor
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 11016
  • Outbreak Monkey ^

  • Online
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2010, 02:29:46 PM »
Bud, I'd be careful carrying ANYWHERE outside Illinois if I were you. Since Illinois still doesn't really issue permits, except in your special case, their permits, being virtually nonexistent, are not recognized by any state. Just getting to the border may be tough on its own.
TexasOutbreak

I take my coffee black...like my rifles.

I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

I'm glad that your chains rest lightly upon you. --JesseL

wyatt

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 473

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2010, 02:44:28 PM »
The Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA) is a United States federal law, enacted in 2004, that allows two classes of persons--the "qualified law enforcement officer" and the "qualified retired law enforcement officer" -- to carry a concealed firearm in any jurisdiction in the United States, regardless of any state or local law to the contrary, with certain exceptions.

Thank you very much, President Bush.  :thumbup1

Matthew Mayner

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 3859
  • (Moose42)
    • matthewmayner.wordpress.com

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2010, 02:50:07 PM »
The Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA) is a United States federal law, enacted in 2004, that allows two classes of persons--the "qualified law enforcement officer" and the "qualified retired law enforcement officer" -- to carry a concealed firearm in any jurisdiction in the United States, regardless of any state or local law to the contrary, with certain exceptions.

Thank you very much, President Bush.  :thumbup1

But why they didn't make it for ALL Concealed weapons license holders is beyond me.  Damn politicians. 
IdahoCome check out my blog for more SCI-FI and Fantasy stories. I promise you lots of explosions!

matthewmayner.wordpress.com

g.willikers

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 804

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2010, 02:51:26 PM »
This seems to have all the answers:

http://www.panda.com/canadaguns/
Trust No One

wyatt

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 473

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2010, 02:54:01 PM »
But why they didn't make it for ALL Concealed weapons license holders is beyond me.  Damn politicians. 

I'd guess because the politicians don't trust the people.


Outbreak

  • NRA Basic Pistol Instructor
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 11016
  • Outbreak Monkey ^

  • Online
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2010, 02:54:37 PM »
The Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA) is a United States federal law, enacted in 2004, that allows two classes of persons--the "qualified law enforcement officer" and the "qualified retired law enforcement officer" -- to carry a concealed firearm in any jurisdiction in the United States, regardless of any state or local law to the contrary, with certain exceptions.

Thank you very much, President Bush.  :thumbup1

Learn something new everyday. Thanks for the explanation, Wyatt. I thought it was an Illinois State law.
TexasOutbreak

I take my coffee black...like my rifles.

I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

I'm glad that your chains rest lightly upon you. --JesseL

Feud

  • Teller of bad jokes.
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 4860

  • Online
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2010, 03:10:45 PM »
But why they didn't make it for ALL Concealed weapons license holders is beyond me.  Damn politicians.  

Maybe they didn't like the idea of the Federal Government telling States what to do...

 ;D

As far as Canada goes, you could always wave Old Glory as you go and declare the land annexed.  It's not like they'll really try to stop you.

Bud

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2010, 04:41:46 PM »
Learn something new everyday. Thanks for the explanation, Wyatt. I thought it was an Illinois State law.

What actually happened is that the Federal Law forced the State of Illinois to comply. They didn't want to but they did finally enact it into law in June of 2005.

I have had absolutely zero problems carrying, even in California or New jersey, both States notoriously against private possession.

I was stopped by a CHP Officer for exceeding the speed limit and I am in the habit of identifying myself as being armed (it's required in some states) and when I did he asked for my ID and CCW. He then asked what i was carrying and I told him a Sig Sauer 1911 he became all excited and wanted to see it. Since he was driving a really hot looking Camaro black and white I let him look at it while sitting in his car checking it out. It was a mutually satisfying "I'll show you mine if you'll show me yours" moment.

I cannot figure out on any of the websites that I have visited what exactly is a prohibited or restricted handgun. It looks to me like I have to an automatic that has a barrel longer than 4 inches that fires less than 10 rounds. An AR-15 is prohibited but a Garand is okay. (say what?)
Bud
I believe many of today's social ills and political party bickering could be solved by the simple implementation of legalized dueling.

Outbreak

  • NRA Basic Pistol Instructor
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 11016
  • Outbreak Monkey ^

  • Online
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2010, 05:04:06 PM »
I cannot figure out on any of the websites that I have visited what exactly is a prohibited or restricted handgun. It looks to me like I have to an automatic that has a barrel longer than 4 inches that fires less than 10 rounds. An AR-15 is prohibited but a Garand is okay. (say what?)

It's all about the "scary look."
TexasOutbreak

I take my coffee black...like my rifles.

I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

I'm glad that your chains rest lightly upon you. --JesseL

g.willikers

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 804

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2010, 05:33:30 PM »
Judging from the info on that website, handguns are either prohibited, due to physical characteristics and/or caliber, or they are restricted, requiring permission and hoop jumping through.
Apparently there are no unrestricted handguns in Canada.
Well, except for the criminals, of course.
Yup, Alaska needs to annex a strip of land from Canada to connect to the lower US.

Maybe you could take a boat from the lower US to Alaska instead of driving through Canada.
There might be some that could take cars, too.
Just a thought.

Hey, lookie here:
http://www.akferry.com/
Trust No One

seanp

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 4630
  • Redneck Canadian

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2010, 05:58:15 PM »
I cannot find out what is on the prohibitive or restricted lists. I would probably just take an S&W 3913 (8 shot mag) and a 5 shot 12 gauge pump.

Anybody have any expereince with this? SEANP, do you know?  Has anybody driven to Alaska lately?

Yep I can answer some of your questions.

As long as it has an 18" barrel the 12g would be the easiest to bring through as it is considered non-restricted.  Just have it trigger locked, unloaded, and out of sight when you bring it in, with the ammunition in a locked container like a tool box.  Fill out your form CAFC 909 at customs and you are good to go.  The shotgun is required to be trigger locked, unloaded, and out of sight "in transport" - also in places like national parks and when left unattended in your vehicle. Non-restricted handling rules are pretty much just common sense.

The pistol is a bit different of a matter.  It must have a barrel longer than 4.1", and be of a caliber other than .25 or .32.  The S&W 3913 is prohibited because of a few millimeters too short a barrel.  A Commander length 1911, a Browning HP, or a HK P7 are examples of reasonably compact pistols that would be ok.  Remember that the mag capacity is what is prohibited, not the pistol capacity.  For example a 13 round mag for a Browning HP is considered to be a prohibited device by itself, whereas a 10 round mag for the same gun is ok.  Pistols are limited to 10 round mags, centerfire semi-auto rifles are limited to 5.  "In transport", the restricted firearm is required to be unloaded, trigger locked, in a locked container with the ammunition in a separate locked container.  What kind of a locking container is not specified.  Some LEO are ok with locked zippers on soft cases, some insist on hard cases.  A locked tool box with the locked, unloaded pistol in a soft case inside is probably the safest bet.  You will also need an ATT (authorization to transport).  I would arrange this long in advance.  Call the CFC at 1-800-731-4000, and if given the choice, speak to the CFO for the province in which you plan on entering.  They should be able to give you a multi-province ATT that will cover you on your trip. *edit*  You will probably have better luck in Alberta, BC, and Saskatchewan (roughly in that order) than the other provinces.  And just to note, the pistol may only lawfully be discharged in an "approved" firing range.

An AR-15 is prohibited but a Garand is okay. (say what?)

Yup.  An AR-15 is actually restricted by name.  But here are two funny parts:  The Garand is also exempt from the 5 round limit for centerfires because of its clip, and although a 30 round USGI AR magazine not modified to only hold 5 rounds is a prohibited device, a LAR 15 mag at ten rounds is fine for AR's...

That's what happens when you have gun laws written by people who know nothing about guns.

If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to answer, and help out if I can.
"Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave."
The Road - Cormac McCarthy

Bud

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2010, 06:16:16 PM »
Yep I can answer some of your questions.

If you have any other questions, I'd be happy to answer, and help out if I can.


Cool, thanks! I will ask for help.

"Her Worship" has decided that driving the same road the ice road truckers drive would be a cool thing to do.



I think the reason we have been married so long is that she continues to amaze and astound me.
Bud
I believe many of today's social ills and political party bickering could be solved by the simple implementation of legalized dueling.


Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.

Thernlund

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 13856

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2010, 06:26:24 PM »
I think you have to have a permit and a good reason to drive that road.


-T.
Arizona  Arm yourself because no one else here will save you.  The odds will betray you, and I will replace you...

Grant

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 6211

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2010, 06:44:00 PM »
  Canada's laws continue to astound me....

And although I won't claim to know their laws by heart, I am truly dumbfounded that the AR-180B is an allowable sporting rifle, while the AR15 is relegated to firing ranges...... :banghead   No way in **** I'm going to Canada under any circumstances.  I'll private-charter an airplane before I soil my boot with Canadian dirt.
Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

Harm

  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 11155

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2010, 06:48:13 PM »
Now thats a little harsh Grant.  There are plenty of good things about canada.  Newfoundlands are some of the best dogs i've ever seen...  Beautiful country, weather, women.  Wouldn't want to live there though, too darn cold.
ArizonaIn Deo Confido

Once more into the fray
Into the last good fight I'll ever know
Live and die on this day
Live and die on this day

GeorgeHill

  • Co-Founder
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 19536
  • The Ogre
    • MadOgre.com

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2010, 06:50:44 PM »
Last time I went to Alaska, I went by way of Seattle and rode the ferry up to AK.   
UtahCo-Founder of WeTheArmed.com
The Ogre from MadOgre.com.

Vires et Honestas
Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.
http://www.madogre.com/

Outbreak

  • NRA Basic Pistol Instructor
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 11016
  • Outbreak Monkey ^

  • Online
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2010, 07:01:07 PM »
Now thats a little harsh Grant.  There are plenty of good things about canada.  Newfoundlands are some of the best dogs i've ever seen...  Beautiful country, weather, women.  Wouldn't want to live there though, too darn cold.

Go to St Johns sometime and party it up. Our crews frequently stop there on their way across the pond, and something about that place seems to break airplanes pretty frequently, stranding the crews for days or even weeks...no one complains.
TexasOutbreak

I take my coffee black...like my rifles.

I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

I'm glad that your chains rest lightly upon you. --JesseL

Bud

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2010, 07:46:11 PM »
I was delivering RV trailers from the manufacturers in northern Indiana for about 18 months after I retired from the VA in 2007. Because I have a clean record (both criminal and traffic), had a passport and was willing to take large trailkers a long ways, I got picked to go to Canada a lot.

I usuallwent in through North Portal North Dakota. The Border Patrol/ICE jackboots ignored me leaving the country and then I had to stop at the Canadian Customs Office. They asked for my passport, my import documents and that usually took (on average) about 3 1/2 minutes and then we would spend the next ten minutes talking about anything and everything. Once they were assured that I didn't need anything, they waved goodbye to me. On several occassions, they warned mne where the Saskatchewn Pronvincial Police might be hiding.

On every single trip, I was treated extremely well by both officials and by service operators(I was driving a Ford F350 with a 6.0L engine so I broke down. A lot.) and by everyday people.

I freaking love the people in Canada and most of them do not like the laws either.

I saw really neat things, too. I was driving towards Edmonton on Trans Canada 16 passing Elk Island National Park, I was stopped by the Provincial Police at a roadside checkpoint. I thought it was a log book check (and I would have been screwed, I was way out of time) but it wasn't. He apologized to me as did his partner who walked up and then the three sat and drank Pepsi out of my cooler while a bison ("you Yanks call them buffalo") herd of over 7,000 head walked from the north side of the road to the south side.Before leaving and without asking, they gave me memorandum to explain the 90 minute delay in my logbook.

I broke down on TC 16 about 50 miles east of Grand Prairie AL. I called the Ford dealer in Grand Prairie and they sent a flatbed for me and towed me back to the dealer. When I tried to pay for the tow, they refused saying they never charged their customers for tows. I lived almost 2800 miles away and they didn't want any money from on the odd chance that i might think of them next time.

I got a Christmas Card from them last year.

I like Canada. The folks in Quebec are a little bit strange and I had to learn to say, "J'Americain" before asking them anything in English but oh, well.

I have to do something quite similar on the west side of Chicago.

I'll never forget the sight of the entire Canadian Parliment outside their Capitol in Ottawa singing the American National anthem on September 12, 2001 either.

As far as their f***** up laws, check out the laws in my State, Illinois, or New Jersey or better yet, California.

And by the way, coming to America through an American checkpoint really sucks. The ICE people are not hired for their people skills.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2010, 08:19:49 PM by Bud »
Bud
I believe many of today's social ills and political party bickering could be solved by the simple implementation of legalized dueling.

Bud

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2010, 08:18:00 PM »


Hey, lookie here:
http://www.akferry.com/


Holy Icebergs, BatMan! Did you see those fares? Her Worship+me+ the Jeep are about $1500.00 one way (meals and libations not included)
Bud
I believe many of today's social ills and political party bickering could be solved by the simple implementation of legalized dueling.

GeorgeHill

  • Co-Founder
  • WTA Staff
  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 19536
  • The Ogre
    • MadOgre.com

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2010, 10:09:33 PM »
Wow.  The rates went up.  I remember paying 150 bucks.  Wait... that was for a motorcycle.  I don't remember...  :doh
UtahCo-Founder of WeTheArmed.com
The Ogre from MadOgre.com.

Vires et Honestas
Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.
http://www.madogre.com/

M1911a1lvr

  • Senior Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 555

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2010, 01:11:01 AM »
  Canada's laws continue to astound me....

And although I won't claim to know their laws by heart, I am truly dumbfounded that the AR-180B is an allowable sporting rifle, while the AR15 is relegated to firing ranges...... :banghead   No way in **** I'm going to Canada under any circumstances.  I'll private-charter an airplane before I soil my boot with Canadian dirt.

   Hey Grant, By the way I am a French Canadian who holds dual citizenship status here in the states. Your ignorance of what Canada is actually like is interesting. Since most of Canada is in many ways just like any American city. Montreal is like New York, Toronto like Detroit, Ottawa is like DC. Vancouver is in most respects like Seattle. If you also like to watch TV, A lot of TV shows that base them selves in certain cities in the US actually film in Montreal, Toronto or Vancouver, which are often referred to as the Canadian Hollywood cities. Some movies coming out of Hollywood are filmed on location in Canada. Montreal was actually the second choice for the Placement of the UN HQ's building, and The US Armed Forces have been a traditional way for some Canadians to become American citizens. Also contrary to some Americans belief's of Canada, We don't all live in igloos, and we all don't say "A" all the time. Of note, yes Most Canadians hate what our gun laws are, But our women do have the right to bare breasts in the big cities, Can you say that of most American cities. Now in the province of Quebec, Most French-Canadians are not snobs, they would like it if people would just make an effort to try to speak the french language. If you have any further questions you would like to ask feel free to do so.

                                                                                                                           Francois "Frank" P Lefebvre Sr.
                                                                                                                           AKA- M1911a1lvr.
Vermont".45 ACP giving our enemies a chance to die since 1911."
"The M1 Garand is the best battle implement ever designed." Patton.
"The M1911a1 is the best combat pistol ever made."
"God made man, Samuel Colt made them equal."
"Airborne Remember this!, Remember who trained you.
Keep your feet and knees together.
The world is 3/4's water.
The rest is dropzone!......

Avenger29

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 3881
  • It's party time, chumps!

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2010, 01:35:55 AM »
Hey, don't be bustin' on the Canadians...my Silverado was made by them...I'd say they did an OK job...




I don't THINK I'll ever have to face down routers in the streets.

I should hope not. Mobs of rogue woodworking tools would suck to repel.

seanp

  • Senior Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 4630
  • Redneck Canadian

  • Offline
Re: Traveling to Alaska through Canada
« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2010, 06:59:39 AM »
"Her Worship" has decided that driving the same road the ice road truckers drive would be a cool thing to do.

 ;D  That would be fun, but like T says I think that you need a permit, and need to meet certain equipment and insurance requirements to travel that route.  Plus, I think that they only run that in the winter, which frankly would be a miserable time to visit the north - the only direction I want to go in the winter is south.  The farther south the better, up to the equator.  I wouldn't want to winter in most places in Idaho or Montana, for example.  They are just as bad as most of Alberta.  I've never been to Alaska myself, but friends who have say it is spectacular in the summer.  A literally untouched and unencumbered wilderness.

I was driving towards Edmonton on Trans Canada 16 passing Elk Island National Park, I was stopped by the Provincial Police at a roadside checkpoint.

Just curious Bud, do you remember if they were Alberta Sheriffs or RCMP?  The provinces outside of Ontario and Quebec don't have true provincial police forces, they contract the RCMP to perform those duties outside of large municipal areas which have their own police forces.  The RCMP is a federal paramilitary police/intelligence/security organization that has come to be widely criticized for its handling of certain affairs over the last decade, and the Province of Alberta has slowly been building up the staffing of the Alberta Sheriff's Office, some speculate to allow the province to release the RCMP at some point in the future.  This is a move that I am greatly in favor of.  Imagine an organization that is DEA/ATF/FBI that also functions as your State and state police, with virtually no judiciary oversight.  That's the RCMP.  Scary.  Now the officers themselves are mostly fine people, but the potential for institutional abuse is appalling.
"Nobody wants to be here and nobody wants to leave."
The Road - Cormac McCarthy


Help support WeTheArmed.com by visiting our sponsors.