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Author Topic: Training a new shooter  (Read 568 times)

StevenTing

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Training a new shooter
« on: February 22, 2017, 10:35:26 AM »
    This past weekend I took a new shooter through some basic fundamentals on shooting.  He had a 1911 and we put 150 rounds down range.

    What do you guys go through when teaching a new shooter?

    Here's what I did:
    • Demonstrate proper grip.
    • Explain why you want your hand to be close to the bore axis.
    • The difference between Isosceles and Weaver Stance.
    • Fundamentals of trigger Pull.
    • Lining up the sights.
    • How to Load and Unload the firearm.
    • What to do with a jam.
    • How to disassemble the firearm.
    • Practice vs. Self Defense ammo

    What else did I miss?  I'm sure there is something.  It's been a long time since I've taught a new shooter so I didn't have a formal list.
Utah

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    stephendutton

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #1 on: February 22, 2017, 11:03:45 AM »
    I do a fair amount of coaching at my rifle club, though it's all prone small bore target shooting.
    Obviously we start with safety, not letting a new applicant shoot on their first visit while we just explain how things work. Then we go through a program that introduces different aspects one at a time so they can get used to each one in turn. This means they begin with the rifle on a rest with the coach loading for them and shooting groups, leading up to using a sling, proper trigger pull and breathing and shooting at individual targets.
    This used to be an informal process, but when we starting getting pupils from the local high school wanting to do the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme with us it was properly documented and now we give new members a printed training pack so anyone can coach them and know where they are up to.
    This Monday I came across one issue when coaching someone on their first shooting visit. I overlooked making sure they knew which bit of the rear sight to look through and I still have no idea where their first five rounds went.  :shrug
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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #2 on: February 22, 2017, 12:21:15 PM »
    I think you got most of the high points.

    Probably the most tactical Timmy question I'll ever ask, but if you have an appropriate site picture- do we really need to teach stance?

    It seems the shooting culture is getting away from stances because they typically don't happen in real life two way ranges.

    We seem to teach an offshoot amalgamation of both the stances. Just my observations.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #3 on: February 22, 2017, 12:43:14 PM »
    Looks like you have a good curriculum.  Nothing I see that you missed.

    Here is what I do as best I recall.

    I really like to train new shooters for 30 minutes to an hour NOT at the range before we go shooting the first time.  Lots easier for them to pay attention in a climate and noise controlled environment.  I generally do this in my home and set up our second family room as a classroom.  The room has plaster over cinderblock behind brick construction on three of four walls, so a "safe, downrange" is easy to establish.

    1. Safety rules
    2. Establish "downrange" and range rules.
    3. Function review of the firearm in question, starting with how to unload and check the chamber, and including load, unload.
    4. Demonstration and hands-on for grip.
    5. Demonstration and hands-on for stance.
    6. Demonstration and hands on for sight alignment and aiming.
    7. Demonstration and hands on for dry-fire.
    8. Lecture on the importance of dry-fire drills.
    9. Stoppage instructions.

    Send them home with instructions to memorize the rules, establish their on dry-fire/handling "range" at home, and to dry fire at least 250 times before our range trip.

    On range day:

    1. Have the student review the safety rules.
    2. Review the rules of the range.
    3. Close the range and hang targets, usually at 5 yards.
    4. Once the range is open, review gun function, chamber check.
    5. 25-50 dry fire shots on the target
    6. Load five rounds and live fire with discussion between each shot.
    7. Load five rounds and let them free fire.
    8. While they are shooting, load the next mag with four live rounds and one dummy/snap-cap without their knowledge.
    9. Introduce them to flinch.  They almost always jerk the dummy down and left.  Discuss.
    10. Have some fun, soda cans, plastic bottles, etc as the range allows.
    11. Police up brass, leave the range cleaner than you found it.
    12. Disassembly and cleaning once back at home.

    That is generally my pattern.  Never really written it out like this before.  I might have missed something.
    Utah

    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #4 on: February 22, 2017, 02:16:43 PM »
    Depends on the goal of the new shooter, if it's a person who wants to carry and is new then I do things differently than if it's someone who just wants to shoot. If they just want to shoot I make sure they are safe, know how to aim etc, and then try and make it fun as well as safe. In that case I'd skip what to do with a malfunction other than keep it pointed in a safe direction and let me take care of it. So I skim over some of the more advanced stuff if they just want to make noise and shoot some steel or something. But if it's someone who wants to carry etc, I typically run through more advanced stuff or at least explain it to them so that they have an idea of why things are done this way or that. But typically if they get to me they already have some of the basics from a CPL class, seldom do I run into someone with the business without a CPL already but it does happen.

    Either way I just walk them through the basics and focus hard on range safety and the like. For me that's the absolute most important element.

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    StevenTing

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #5 on: February 22, 2017, 03:40:37 PM »
    In my specific case this past weekend, my shooter is mostly a hunter.  Rifle stuff and shotguns so they know the basics of firearms.  He received his CCW Permit 2 years ago but finally just bought his pistol.  He had not really fired a handgun before.  So I did more of the basics and just wanted to get him comfortable with the recoil and help him build confidence.

    We did most of our stuff at 5 yards. As he got more comfortable, we extended it to 10 yards.  And then for the fun of it, we went out to 25 yards at the end.  Surprisingly, he got 6 out of 7 at that distance on a 15x15 inch target.
    Utah

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #6 on: February 22, 2017, 06:44:50 PM »
    I started a new shooter (as in never fired a gun before in her life) about six months ago.  Topics covered were:
    Safety
    Nomenclature (what are all the parts called)
    Safety
    Basic operations (how and why it works)
    Safety
    Basic techniques (how to load, unload, make it safe)
    Safety
    How to run it (how to hold it, work the trigger, work the slide, work the safety)
    Safety
    How to disassemble, clean and reassemble it, and make sure it still works
    Safety.

    And we may have touched on basic safety, as well.

    Today, I had the pleasure of taking her to one of my favorite gun shops in the area, and helping her pick out her very first ever firearm(s).  She left with a Ruger SR9C, two spare magazines, 100 rounds of FMJ practice ammo, and 50 rounds of JHPs, for social occasions.  The gun shop owner even let her take her new pistol to the range for free, and gave her 50 rounds of practice ammo, so she could make sure it worked before she took it home.  She's got her CCW permit application in, and she's already signed up for the shop's familiarization course (and she's bringing a friend!).

    For some reason, she also bought a Mossberg 590 12-ga. shotgun (18.5 inch bbl, extended tube) because it was on sale.  She asked me to take the shotgun home, and go through it (clean, lube, function-test) and when she's fairly comfortable with the pistol, she wants to start up again with the shotgun. 

    And OTD for less than $600!


    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    MTK20

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #7 on: February 22, 2017, 07:22:35 PM »
    I started a new shooter (as in never fired a gun before in her life) about six months ago.  Topics covered were:
    Safety
    Nomenclature (what are all the parts called)
    Safety
    Basic operations (how and why it works)
    Safety
    Basic techniques (how to load, unload, make it safe)
    Safety
    How to run it (how to hold it, work the trigger, work the slide, work the safety)
    Safety
    How to disassemble, clean and reassemble it, and make sure it still works
    Safety.

    And we may have touched on basic safety, as well.

    Today, I had the pleasure of taking her to one of my favorite gun shops in the area, and helping her pick out her very first ever firearm(s).  She left with a Ruger SR9C, two spare magazines, 100 rounds of FMJ practice ammo, and 50 rounds of JHPs, for social occasions.  The gun shop owner even let her take her new pistol to the range for free, and gave her 50 rounds of practice ammo, so she could make sure it worked before she took it home.  She's got her CCW permit application in, and she's already signed up for the shop's familiarization course (and she's bringing a friend!).

    For some reason, she also bought a Mossberg 590 12-ga. shotgun (18.5 inch bbl, extended tube) because it was on sale.  She asked me to take the shotgun home, and go through it (clean, lube, function-test) and when she's fairly comfortable with the pistol, she wants to start up again with the shotgun. 

    And OTD for less than $600!

    The woman has good taste  :cool. I still have yet to buy myself a 590.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
    Ray Chapman, used to say that the 125-grain Magnum load’s almost magical stopping power was the only reason to load .357 instead of .38 Special +P ammunition into a fighting revolver chambered for the Magnum round. I agree. - Massad Ayoob

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    Re: Training a new shooter
    « Reply #8 on: February 22, 2017, 07:56:04 PM »
    The only reason I had to go with her was because she was leery of being a black female in a gun shop full of old white guys.  That all went away when the first counter person came up and asked me if he could help me.

    I turned to my friend, and said "This young lady has decided that she needs to take an active part in her own protection and self-defense, and we're here to help her find what works best for that purpose."  I swear, the man's eyes lit up!  After that, it was all her!

    I had suggested a Mossberg youth model 20 ga., since that what we use here at home, but she's confident that she can ballast a 12-bore, and I think she can.  The plus side to a 12 ga. is that the choices for home defense ammo are much better.

    Shame you aren't in this area. The Mossberg 590s are going (at this shop, at least) for $249.99, while supplies last.
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

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