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Author Topic: Hydrolysis shoe failure?  (Read 567 times)

luke213(adamsholsters)

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Hydrolysis shoe failure?
« on: August 07, 2016, 07:37:29 PM »
So guys I'm wondering if anyone else has heard this term related to shoes or boots?

Story, I bought Piloti shoes back oh around 2008ish and I loved them, they are a casual racing style shoe. I actually used them quite allot back when I used to do Sim Racing, and I used them on all my trips around the country when we were traveling. Some point around the time we came back home I put them up with some other boots and promptly forgot about them. I figured they were somewhere and I'd find them. They were in good shape, slightly worn soles but perfectly functional. And being mostly leather I figured hey they will be fine. Well a few weeks ago I found them right before we left for a couple days camping. I noticed the soles were a little weird, like hard but I was busy so I pushed it out of my mind. Used them to drive the motorhome for our camping trip. The next day we were getting ready to go do a little hike and I thought hey I'll wear my super comfortable Piloti's. Well the sole was failing badly before I could get to the Jeep. Ended up changing shoes but since then it's been in the back of my mind that A I'd like another pair. And B that I don't want them to fail again the same way.

So down that rabbit hole I came across a large amount of discussion about people with soles on shoes failing apparently via a somewhat natural process in molded polyurethane soles. Which makes me want rubber soles on all my shoes rather than this crap. But I wanted to pass on the info since it will be effecting my buying of boots and shoes going forward, and as well see if you guys have encountered this same thing. Best I know this is the first I've seen it on my shoes and boots but I'll keep an eye out for it going forward.

Luke

EDIT: Here is a posted article about the same thing: http://www.phlmetropolis.com/2011/11/the-case-of-the-crumbling-shoes.php
MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

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    ksuguy

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    Re: Hydrolysis shoe failure?
    « Reply #1 on: August 07, 2016, 09:43:14 PM »
    Great,  hope the extra pair of boots I bought a 2 or 3 years ago don't fall apart.  I got two since they were on sale and I'm still wearing the first pair.   
    Kansas

    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: Hydrolysis shoe failure?
    « Reply #2 on: August 07, 2016, 09:45:10 PM »
    That's sort of my concern. I've got allot of boots and shoes. Not because I need them all but with our weather I switch through the year and allot of them sit half the year when it's not crotch deep snow;)

    Either way interesting thing to be aware of with both boots and shoes.

    Sent from my XT1060 using Tapatalk

    MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

    coelacanth

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    Re: Hydrolysis shoe failure?
    « Reply #3 on: August 07, 2016, 10:53:00 PM »
    Been dealing with that same basic phenomenon for several years.  Working outdoors in Phoenix during the summer is tough on shoes generally but a fair number of the pairs I've worn and worn out over the last five years have exhibited some variation of that problem. 

    The only pairs I've had that long that haven't done so are a pair of Danner's with the Gore-Tex liner and a pair of U.S.A. made Reebok cross trainers.   Three or four others have all failed in some way - New Balance, Nike, Rockport and Skechers if memory serves.  In years past both Clark's and Brooks have also failed in a similar fashion. 

    You can usually repair them once with Shoe Goo or some other adhesive of that type but once the basic material begins to deteriorate nothing helps them. 
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
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