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NRA Pistol Instructor course

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xsquidgator:

--- Quote from: eskimo jim on April 10, 2009, 09:37:43 AM ---xsquidgator,
I took the Basic Pistol Instructor course several years ago.  the course is more about learning how to teach and organize the class than a marksmanship class or basic pistol class.  Part of the instructor class is the basic pistol class so you will shoot a revolver and a semi-auto.

The only thing I'd say about the instructor class is ask questions and participate in the class.

I'd like to do the rifle instructor class and the reloading class but I don't think they would be very helpful to me.

Jim

--- End quote ---

I just finished the Basic Pistol Instructor course today, 11 hours yesterday and 7 hours today.  What you said is pretty descriptive of my class.  I'm glad I took it b/c know I have access to a good basic course outline to teach, and to know that if I just cover the materials per the instructor's guide it'll be an ok self-contained course.  If I can shell out the $ (depends on what my better half says) I'll be taking Rifle Instructor, Personal Protection Inside the Home Instructor, Personal Protection Outside the Home (student), and Personal Protection Outside the Home (instructor) by the same guy at our club by the end of the summer.  My initial goal was to get certified to teach all of those classes, but I don't know if I'll be getting it done this year or not.  I'm not doing this to make money, other than to break even, I just want to be able to provide a service by teaching these classes.  As limited as it is, the Basic Pistol class and even the First Steps class will suffice for people to get their Florida CWP, so just this class alone was worth the close to $300 it cost.

I do have to give props to the NRA Instructor class for their exercise in costing out what it will take to offer classes under varying conditions.  That was a good exercise, and the other stuff in the class instructor-wise I thought was pretty good. 

eskimo jim:
Xsquidgator,
I became a Pistol instructor a couple of years ago.  I don't go out of my way teaching classes.  I do classes for friends of friends.  I won't get into advertising on the NRA's website for courses, fliers etc until I form a Limited Liability Company to teach it.  I want to insulate my personal assets as much as possible.  If a student gets involved in a self defense shooting, I want to be able to shield myself from as much litigation as possible.  I'd suggest you do the same if you are going to pursue it.

I typically charge a little less than the going rate, teach at the student's home and I have them try a variety of firearms once they show themselves as safe with a .22lr revolver and pistol.  I figure that if they try different handguns they will be able to make an informed decision when they buy their own gear.

Jim

GeorgeHill:
I took the course years and years ago in VA.  I remember my teacher's name.  Michael Jackson. 
The class was boring and I didn't learn anything new or valuable except that the NRA hates calling guns "Weapons".    ::)

xsquidgator:

--- Quote from: GeorgeHill on April 13, 2009, 02:24:49 AM ---I took the course years and years ago in VA.  I remember my teacher's name.  Michael Jackson. 
The class was boring and I didn't learn anything new or valuable except that the NRA hates calling guns "Weapons".    ::)


--- End quote ---

For anything sporting rather than self-defense related, that is still the case.  This was one example my instructor (Russ Coley) gave of 'even if you don't agree with it, if you're teaching the NRA class then you have to teach it the way they want it taught'.  One thing I'm thinking of is to teach a short class tailored to introducing people to handguns and possibly self-defense, and to have that class count as instruction that Florida will count as meeting the educational and firearms proficiency requirement for getting a Florida CWP.  I have to review the Instructor Course guide again but if I recall correctly, you can teach something else and call it anything you want, you just have to include "This is not an NRA-approved course" in the same typeface and size as the course name on the certificate.  (And FL will still accept it). 

Oh, about "weapons".  In order to reinforce the point, the instructor made a class rule, every time someone said the "W" word, that person had to put $1 in the class kitty that was used to buy donuts for the morning of the 2nd day's class.  I didn't slip up myself but we had a couple dozen donuts the 2nd day.  I was feeling a little comedic so I asked the guy behind me "why did we invade Iraq, what were we looking for?"   :clap  Got him!

xsquidgator:

--- Quote from: eskimo jim on April 12, 2009, 09:11:04 PM ---Xsquidgator,
I became a Pistol instructor a couple of years ago.  I don't go out of my way teaching classes.  I do classes for friends of friends.  I won't get into advertising on the NRA's website for courses, fliers etc until I form a Limited Liability Company to teach it.  I want to insulate my personal assets as much as possible.  If a student gets involved in a self defense shooting, I want to be able to shield myself from as much litigation as possible.  I'd suggest you do the same if you are going to pursue it.

I typically charge a little less than the going rate, teach at the student's home and I have them try a variety of firearms once they show themselves as safe with a .22lr revolver and pistol.  I figure that if they try different handguns they will be able to make an informed decision when they buy their own gear.

Jim

--- End quote ---

My wife and I formed a PLLC (same idea as an LLC) already which I plan to use.  She's an independent contractor so all of her income gets paid to the PLLC, and whatever income I earn from doing this will also be paid to our PLLC rather than to me.  Once my instructor credentials arrive, I'll look into the NRA liability insurance and make sure I have that lined up first, you're certainly spot-on there.  One of my club's members and NRA instructors is a lawyer and I'll ask him for an opinion or pay for his services to get an appropriate liability waiver made up too.

I like your idea of offering classes at the student's house.  I was going to do it at my house but I think your idea is better for most cases.  I have a good variety of handguns from 22 on up to show them and use during the range sessions.  I'd like to be able to cost it out so that the course fees paid by the students will at least cover the course materials and my liability insurance, and get back some of the $ the instructor courses are costing me.  Florida is one of the places where apparently there is red-hot interest in getting a CWP and the state currently has a backlog of tens of thousands of applications from what I heard.  In this environment I've heard of NRA Instructors charging $90 a head just for a 4 hour First Steps class.  I'd be thrilled if I can just do friends of friends like you do and make enough to pay for some of the overhead, the real reason I'm doing this is to hopefully be of service to people and expand the number of responsible gun owners.

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