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Author Topic: Suppressor design  (Read 11956 times)

Lokidude

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Suppressor design
« on: March 09, 2011, 11:41:51 PM »
It recently dawned on me that the mini-lathe in my basement, with just a few parts, can be returned to it's original metal-cutting configuration. Seeing as I can buy parts and tooling at distributor cost, I figured why not tool up and cut metal? And why not do that with the immediate goal of making a suppressor or three?

My problem now is trying to understand suppressor design, and what makes one work. From the research I've been able to do, I think I want a mono core (looks like a simpler, cleaner design), and I know I'd like to be able to disassemble it for cleaning. Beyond that, school me. Wet vs dry, slant baffle, milled core?

The calibers I'm looking at to start are .22 (probably the first can), .45ACP (because it screams "suppress me") and 7.62.

As far as tooling, right now I have or have access to drill presses, a small lathe, oxy/acetylene and mig welding equipment. I'm planning on acquiring a small vertical mill in the near future, as well.
Utah


Harm

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2011, 12:53:26 AM »
First thing you want to do is work out the legal aspect.  Hate to get all this other work first & then have to halt or worse end up in trouble over it.
ArizonaIn Deo Confido

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MacLean

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2011, 01:32:26 AM »
First thing you want to do is work out the legal aspect.  Hate to get all this other work first & then have to halt or worse end up in trouble over it.

+1

Manufacturing is a good way to loose all your guns, your rights to guns, and your lathe - unless you do the paperwork.
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Outbreak

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2011, 02:11:48 AM »
Silencertalk.com has a silencer-smithing forum. I don't know jack about working with metal, so I've never looked in there, but I know it's there. Probably a good place to start.

Legally, you need to submit a Form 1 with a $200 check, and WAIT till they return it with a Tax Stamp before you can START building any part of your can.

Repeat for each and every can you make.
TexasOutbreak

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JesseL

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2011, 10:29:24 AM »
Something like this can be turned out in just a few hours if you have access to a mill.



http://tml.travellercentral.com/suppressors/index.html

Arizona

Lokidude

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2011, 03:15:56 PM »
I'm up to speed on the "keep Loki outta prison" end of things.  It's the actual design and principles where I'm lacking. I have a copy of the Form 1, courtesy of a DD/SBR/FA builder.  My design questions basically stem from having too much information, and not enough knowledge about what makes particular designs better or worse.
Utah

Outbreak

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2011, 06:51:25 PM »
Well, just based on what I've seen in commercially sold ones, the one Jesse showed looks super heavy. Lots of material there that doesn't need to be. You want open space in there to give the propellant gasses somewhere to go and cool off. Extra metal isn't doing anything except reducing that volume.

As far as shapes go, couldn't tell ya.
TexasOutbreak

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I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

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JesseL

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2011, 07:11:09 PM »
Ah, but given two suppressors of equal internal volume won't the heavier of the two absorb more heat and yield better suppression after an extended string of shots?  :neener

Aside from that, it would be trivial to make it a bit lighter if you so choose. All things considered though, it is going to be hard for a homebuild to beat a good commercial can for weight and quietness.
Arizona

mattitude

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2011, 10:24:01 PM »
The K baffle designs seem to have better performance while the monocore designs are easier to service. 
North CarolinaMedically retired Air Force (17 years, 7 months & 25 days)

Outbreak

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2011, 12:43:14 AM »
Ah, but given two suppressors of equal internal volume won't the heavier of the two absorb more heat and yield better suppression after an extended string of shots?  :neener

Aside from that, it would be trivial to make it a bit lighter if you so choose. All things considered though, it is going to be hard for a homebuild to beat a good commercial can for weight and quietness.

The more hot gasses you can contain while they expand and dissipate heat, the less sound there will be. A hot can is typically quieter than a cold one. That's why suppressor evaluations usually list the first round "pop" separately from the rest of the string.
TexasOutbreak

I take my coffee black...like my rifles.

I absolutely despise Glocks. That's why I only own two.

I'm glad that your chains rest lightly upon you. --JesseL

Splodge Of Doom

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2011, 05:05:05 AM »
I have some ideas for suppressor designs that I haven't got around to making yet.

What machinery/tooling do you have access to?

JesseL

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Re: Suppressor design
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2011, 10:58:50 AM »
The more hot gasses you can contain while they expand and dissipate heat, the less sound there will be. A hot can is typically quieter than a cold one. That's why suppressor evaluations usually list the first round "pop" separately from the rest of the string.

First round pop is from the ignition of flammable stuff (gun oil/grease/power residue) inside the suppressor. After the oxygen inside the suppressor has been consumed by that first pop it doesn't happen anymore.

Hot gasses have more volume than cool gasses, so if you can get them to cool off through contact with a colder suppressor there will be room for more gas.
Arizona


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