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Author Topic: Buying Used (stocks edition)  (Read 4070 times)

Gundoc

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Buying Used (stocks edition)
« on: January 07, 2009, 12:07:21 AM »
Stocks are a fairly easy topic. The only options are wood or synthetic. Within that are a lot of choices though. You can do a lot of looking and find used rifles with very nice wood stocks, stocks that are ready to be added to your collection. Of course there are also wood stocks that need a lot of work. There are the same circumstances for the synthetic stocks. The biggestm, difference is they type and finish of that stock. Well let's break down the options. With woodm stocks I would look first at the type of finish on it. You will find two separate types.
(1) An oil finish.
Most older guns will all have an oil finish like the above M1 stock. The type of oil used is the important part. Tung oil is best. It well fully dry and be very weather resistant. The other is Lin Seed oil. All old military arms were finished with Lin Seed oil. Not the best idea but it was still widely used. Lin Seed oil in it's pure form will never fully dry. The problem with this is that moisture can still penetrate. Yes it can warp enough to make a difference but it takes a good amount of moisture. It still protects the stock but just not as well as Tung oil that dries completely. Oil finishes are a two edged sword. They are a great finish with a warm luster but it scratches easily. The great part about oil finishes is that they are the easiest to work with if you wanted to refinish the stock.

(2) RKW finish.

This finish is how the large companies like Remington and Browning get the high gloss shine on their stocks. Here are the big differences, an RKW finish does not soak very far into the wood unlike oil finishes. Oil finishes leave the wood susceptible to scratches while RKW finishes give an exterior armor to the wood that is harder than the hubs of Hades. This makes it very scratch and dent resistant. However, if you want to refinish one of these stocks you need the best stripping compound you can find and a few days of scraping.

So with that in mind your next step is just how many scratches are too many? That's really a question only you can answer. Just keep in mind that there could be a good deal of work to get it to the condition you want it in.

Ok, now for synthetics. There are many different styles from hunter to thumb hole to the do every thing target stocks. Then there are a few finish choices. There is the usual factory black or O.D. green and then you have your dipped camo. That's basically it. Synthetics get scratched but there is no good way to repair that. You simply have a scratched stock. It doesn't compromise that integrity of the stock as long as it is a surface scratch and not a huge gouge. I say that because some poor quality aftermarket synthetic stocks are made of thin fiberglass filled with foam. If you find one of these stocks stay away from them.


The great thing with synthetic is if you get it scratched or just don't like the finish any more just go to


Brownells  or even Wal-Mart and get a can of spray paint and redo the color of it. The paint will fill in most minor scratches or at least make them hard to see. We talked last month about evaluating the time and money you want to put into the metal of your possible used gun purchase. The same goes for the wood. Do you want to bother with the stock at all? Then find one that doesn't need work or one that you can live with the few scratches on it. Do you want to try refinishing the stock on your own? Keep in mind there's a lot of work involved to do that. It can be very satisfying doing it but takes a lot of dedicated time.
 

When it comes to buying used guns there's a lot of questions that only you can answer. I just hope I've given you enough of the right questions to ask yourself. Let me leave you with this piece of advice, take your time, do your homework, and listen to your gut and you will make a purchase your grand kids will enjoy.

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    Khorne

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 11:20:09 PM »
    Thanks for the info!  I got a mosin that has a few scratches on it.  (been around since '42)  As an artist I use lin seed oil, but where can I find that other type?
    UtahIt doesn't cost me to be nice, but nothing gets you nothing and everything's got a little price.
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    Gundoc

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #2 on: February 05, 2009, 11:58:28 PM »
    Thanks for the info!  I got a mosin that has a few scratches on it.  (been around since '42)  As an artist I use lin seed oil, but where can I find that other type?
    Tung oil you can get at the hardware store or walmart in a quick drying version. However it dries so fast that just taking your fingers off the stock from applying it will leave finger prints. Go to Brownells.com and they have a pure tung oil without the drying agents.

    booksmart

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #3 on: July 11, 2013, 12:35:57 AM »
    What about TruOil?

    Gundoc

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #4 on: July 11, 2013, 01:29:16 AM »
    Good stuff.




    Mississippi556

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #5 on: July 11, 2013, 09:28:51 AM »
    If you use linseed oil, make sure to buy BOILED linseed oil.  The regular oil will stay gummy and never dry.  Put the boiled stuff on just a drop or two at a time and rub it deeply into the wood.  Set it aside for several weeks.  Repeat.  Many times.  Maintain the same way. Personally, I prefer it to tung oil only because it seems to have a deeper glow.

    For me TruOil dries too fast.  Really beautiful oil finished stocks are time consuming works of art.
    Mississippi"When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe"  Words of Jesus, Luke 11:21 (ESV).

    Gundoc

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    Re: Buying Used (stocks edition)
    « Reply #6 on: July 11, 2013, 10:05:39 AM »
    If you use linseed oil, make sure to buy BOILED linseed oil.  The regular oil will stay gummy and never dry.
     

    And even then it's not 100% dry/cured. Absolutely get the boiled linseed oil though.

    Quote
    Put the boiled stuff on just a drop or two at a time and rub it deeply into the wood.  Set it aside for several weeks.  Repeat.  Many times.  Maintain the same way.

    That's the process guys. Takes a long time to get a proper oil finish.
    Quote

    Personally, I prefer it to tung oil only because it seems to have a deeper glow.

    I like it for it's hard cure but prefer how easy linseed oil is to work with. Never buy the quick dry tung oil by mistake. It's a finger print disaster.

    Quote
    Really beautiful oil finished stocks are time consuming works of art.

    100% It's an act of love.

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