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Author Topic: Jan/Feb Holster contest  (Read 2287 times)

luke213(adamsholsters)

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Jan/Feb Holster contest
« on: February 08, 2017, 07:19:23 PM »
Alrighty guys a month has gone by without a contest and some of you might be wondering what is going on;) Well it was planned so this months contest is slightly shorter then past months(my fault snow etc getting in the way this week;). But we're going to do a bigger contest since it's two months combined this month will be a $100 discount off an order.

But for this first one here is the rules. You need to post to get a number assigned once that number is assigned you will not get another number if you post again. So your not increasing your odds by posting more than once though your welcome to continue the conversation with more posts. Those numbers I'll assign in order, IE the first person to post will get #1 and second will get #2 and so on. Once the thread is locked say a day before the end of the month I'll go to a random number generator online and have it pick a number from the posts then I'll put a final post in the thread with the persons forum name announcing they won.

Then once the drawing is complete I'll send you a private message on WTA to get your full name as it will be listed on your order. When you place the order copy a link to the WTA thread so I can make sure that I've got the right person etc. And then I'll take care of applying the discount to the order for you. You'll still be responsible for the balance on the order once I get ready to build it out like I normally do less the $100 discount.

For now I'm not going to put a limit on the time frame you have to use the discount within, but I'd prefer guys use them fairly quickly just so I don't have to keep too many active at once and make things more confusing on my end.

Do keep in mind this doesn't effect where your order falls in my lead time. So once the contest is over, and the person who won places an order it falls into my normal timetable. Also that discount doesn't apply to orders already paid or complete. However if you've got an order still waiting that hasn't been paid for, then I'd be more than willing to apply the discount to that order for you.

So question or discussion for this month is going to be somewhat shooting related, however regional as well. So I want to hear your opinion of the shooting culture in your area, and the types of firearms that are most common.

As an example here would be my response:

Quote
Living in the UP of Michigan for those not familiar is a very cold and snowy winter for half the year. The summers are nice other than the bugs but overall I'll say the climate and remote nature of the UP keeps out allot of the more irritating portion of the population and if they are around we've got enough room you don't have to see them very often;) Culture wise I'd say we're primarily a Hunting culture for guns around here, virtually everyone or 99% of everyone owns at least one firearm for hunting typically a rifle say a 30-30 or 30.06 or something generally for deer. Some guys of course have significantly more firearms and somewhat strangely locally we have a fair large number of higher end collectors of shotguns and the like. Since the area economically is in tough shape and has been for 30+ years with most of the mining closing down and not much else for opportunity. It's somewhat surprising to see that number of very expensive shotguns etc in this particular area. But overall I'd describe our area as primarily hunting, and generally short range at that. Very little long range shooting around here, for instance on my property unless shooting down a road, or power line you'll never shoot game past 100 yards. There are too many trees to take a further shot anywhere around here, and most of the UP is the same way. There is a small IDPA and cowboy action shooting community around here though it's not very large at this point and honestly unless you're a gun guy you would likely never know it existed in this area.

So I'd like to hear what type of culture and some info about your particular area, since while Sarah and I traveled there were a few times with starkly different areas than I was used to that I thought about this question. For instance when living in Arizona for that stretch I really thought to myself "I don't own a long enough range rifle for this terrain":) And now since then a buddy was moving out that way and I told him since he and I think about the same, to bring something long range with a scope. Not because he's going to need it for anything, but the ranges you can shoot are so much further than within heavy woods the want is strong for a longer range firearm;)

Take care!

Luke
MichiganI am the owner/proprietor of www.adamsholsters.com Custom holsters made for you. To contact me please use E-mail rather than Private Messages, luke@adamsholsters.com

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    Kaso

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #1 on: February 08, 2017, 10:03:34 PM »
    So I'd like to hear what type of culture and some info about your particular area...
    For my area, the easy answer would be deer rifles.  This corner of Pennsylvania lives for deer season.  I would say the vast majority of households (in my area, that I know of) use scoped bolt actions in 'real' calibers.  .30-06, 7mm Mag, and the kiddies shoot .243.  This is almost amusing, because with the exception of corn or hay fields, nearly all shots in this area are well under 100 yards, and especially so for those hunters (the majority) who walk the woods.  Yet, I have only met one guy who used to use a .30-30 in the woods, and even that was scoped.  He now uses a 7mm Mag.

    That is my area in general.  My immediate area, the farmers and others in my township, hunt deer as well, but the more frequent target is varmints.  Groundhogs, skunk, possums, coons, groundhogs, stray cats, groundhogs, coyotes, and more groundhogs. :thumbup1  For the small ones, the most popular choice by far is a scoped .17HMR.  For coyotes, whatever is handy, but I hear a .243 is plenty powerful for them.  We do not have a hog problem in this state, thank God.

    Though I do not do it myself, hunting is widely accepted.  Most non hunters don't view hunting as 'good' or 'evil,' it just... is.  It is our way of life.  Beyond hunting, the RKBA is strongly supported, but 'discreetly.'  Lots of guys that own guns, you would never know it. 

    Most local gun owners believe in defense, and a good number (though I would be lying if I quoted percentages) own at least a cheap handgun.  Cheap.  And this leads to another point of the local culture, though not one exclusive to firearms.  People around here are cheapskates.  Even when they don't have to be, it's always: "Which of these is the cheapest?"  Not the 'best,' not the most effective, and not the one that has the features that I want...  No, 'which of these is the cheapest?'

     :facepalm
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    coelacanth

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #2 on: February 08, 2017, 10:40:14 PM »
    Well, as you say, Arizona can easily be the home of the long distance shot.  That said, its a funny place when you start hunting.  Not much besides pronghorn antelope will present itself for a 400-500 yard shot with any regularity. I've seen a lot more deer and elk in dense stands of timber and scrub oak and juniper thickets than I have in cross canyon shots.  Javelina and coyotes cross roads pretty regularly so sometimes you'll get a decent shot before they drift into the vegetation beside the road but its not something you can always count on.  The .270 Winchester is wildly popular here - with good reason - and the .308 is as well.  Lots of folks opt for magnums to begin with but finally settle on standard calibers more often than not.  Cheaper to shoot, less recoil, same result seems to be the line of thinking there.

    Lots of folks are into the AR rifles here and tactical gear is pretty popular but I think many make do with a pump shotgun and a double action revolver in the home defense role.  An acquaintance of mine who's family has ranched here for generations keeps a '98 Krag-Jorgensen in 30/40 and a Colt Peacemaker in 38/40 in the high country line cabin for situations requiring something more than harsh language.  I never asked but got the impression that those guns had been with the family for a long time. 

    Wingshooting is pretty big here so there are a lot of fairly high dollar shotguns in the field in the fall.  We are blessed (?) with a dry climate so keeping those guns in nice condition is a bit easier than back east where cold and damp rule the day for much of the year.  At any rate, its nice to see some guns that would run well into four figures on their price tags actually out earning a living in the game fields from time to time. 
    Arizona"A dying culture invariably exhibits personal rudeness.  Bad manners.  Lack of consideration for others in minor matters.  A loss of politeness, of gentle manners, is more significant than is a riot."
                          Robert A. Heinlein ,   Friday

    Grant

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #3 on: February 08, 2017, 11:22:02 PM »
       Montana at the current moment is a land of clashing values.

       15 years ago thutty-thutty's and Aught Sixes were considered cutting edge technology that no one needed anything else.    Since then we've kinda caught up ;)

        More people own guns that not up here, and it's actually rare for most people to not have 2-4 at least, even "non gun people", simply for the differences in gopher hunting and deer hunting, and Montana has a much higher percentages of people owning handguns,etc. strictly for home defense.

         Most all guns are scoped, simply because we are extremely open.  While close shots are possible and many are taken, there's also many, MANY opportunities for 300+ yard shots.        Standard bolt action .30-06, 7mm magnum, .270 and .300 magnums are probably the most common deer rounds, while .22-250's, .243's are heavily used by beginning hunters and also for coyote hunting.

        Recently there's been a huge influx of AR's and semi-autos of all brands.  For hunting as well as just shooting.    Even ten years ago the old "fudds" trash talked and looked down on all semi-automatics.  Now it's rare to find a person without one.    Montana being one of the more "strong headed" of people, I can honestly say that it is RARE for people who own more than one gun to not have a semi-auto.    I know 70 year old ranchers who have just had a .22 and a .30-30 their whole life who have purchased AR15's and scoped them.     

       I will say too that Montanans are not scared to drop cash on guns.   I would say locally the cheap guns don't sell well at ALL.    Kel-tec handguns while they work, are hard to resell.  Cheap shotguns, Hi-points, 80's era Mossberg bolt actions,etc. are hard to trade out of.  People are willing to pay the extra $100-$200 to get a Ruger, Smith or Savage.

     
    Montana"I’d say the worst part of all this is the feeling of betrayal,           but I’m betting the part where they break in here and beat us to death might be worse.”

    Langenator

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #4 on: February 09, 2017, 10:58:20 AM »
    I haven't lived here all that long, so I've only seen a little bit, but here goes:

    This is Aggieland. Semi-rural (thanks to the university) central Texas.  It seems like everyone has their deer lease, and when dove season comes around, most folks do that, too.  Heck, even the (female) evidence tech was chatting with one of the (female) records clerks at the University PD about her deer lease and maybe moving the feeder.  And most folks who have any land kill hogs, because hogs tear everything up.  Although it was a mite surprising to discover that the guy at church goes after them with a suppressed 6.8 SPC AR with a night vision scope.  So even what you might expect to be a bastion of tradition, night surprise you.

    There are plenty of places to shoot, even if you don't have a friend who will let you shoot on his land (plenty of those, too).  Four outdoor ranges, one of which hosts 3-gun, USPSA, and steels matches pretty much every month, and another that hosts shotgun type matches, including sporting clays.  One indoor pistol range, always people shooting there.

    Oh, and the big outdoor range hosted the SASP winter regionals last weekend.

    So, a heavy base of tradition, with a generous dose of the new and latest tech.  (Which is a reasonable enough summary of Texas A&M as well.)
    TexasFortuna Fortis Paratus

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #5 on: February 09, 2017, 03:39:10 PM »
    In my circles the culture seems to revolve around guns with a military background.  M1's, AR's, AK's, SKS's all seem really popular around here.  I am helping a non-gun guy restore a 1903 Springfield Mk 1 right now.  An old work acquaintance, he called me outta the blue asking if I would look at his rifle.

    That said, even the non-gun/anti-gun folks I know here usually have a bolt action rifle.  Usually in 30-06, 270, etc.  Usually grandpa's gun that they inherited.
    Utah

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #6 on: February 10, 2017, 12:10:42 PM »
    In this area, the big game is deer and feral hogs, with everything from .30-30s to .243s to .300 Win Mags getting into the mix.  ARs are becoming more popular, and there's a few of us using oddball rounds like 7mm-08.  Long shots are generally under 200 yards, with very rare opportunities to get out to 300+.  The deer run small, mostly, with a big buck usually still under 200 lbs, and if they are taken for table fare, the preferred hogs are in the 100-200 lbs. range.

    Small game is popular, with just about everybody having a .22 LR for squirrels and rabbits, and you've got to have a shotgun for doves, although dove hunting is more a social occasion than actually hunting.  When I was growing up, there were a number of dedicated quail hunters, but the coyote population boom has made bobwhites a rarity, anymore.  There's a few dedicated turkey hunters, who use specialized shotguns for that.

    Around here, the question is not "Do you own a gun?"  It's more like, "What kinds of guns do you own?"
    Alabama"Stand your ground!  Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!"  Capt. John Parker

    bignate88

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #7 on: February 10, 2017, 05:12:59 PM »
    around me in Illinois hunting revolves around the shotgun seeing as the only things you can hunt with any type of rifle pretty much boils down to coyote, raccoons and squirrels and by in large those are not extremely popular game although i am seeing more coyote hunting with ars laity. most hunting is deer,duck,goose and turkey all done with shotguns by in large semi-autos with a smattering of pump guns.

    outside of hunting you see just about everything with a strong bias toward the polymer pistols and the evil back rifle unsurprisingly
    IllinoisThere’s a story about a turtle and a scorpion. Scorpion is stranded on a river bank. Turtle sees this and asks Scorpion to get on his back and he’ll take him across the river. Scorpion gets on Turtle’s back and they go into the river. When they’re about halfway across, Scorpion stings Turtle. As Turtle is sinking, knowing they’re both going to die, he asks Scorpion "Why did you sting me, we’re both going to die?" and Scorpion says "It’s not my fault; it’s what I am."

    lesptr

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    Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #8 on: February 10, 2017, 05:26:32 PM »
    I live just south of Atlanta and my only reference is what I see at the local outdoor range. On the rifle range, the vast majority of shooters are using AR's. I do see some AK's but in much smaller numbers. There's is also a good many shooting "precision" rifles all the way out to 200 yards .  A couple guys with .50 cals working up loads.

    On the pistol range,  most off the folks are shooting a polymer pistol of one flavor or another, but There are a couple of geezer groups that come out with the nice older revolvers and high end 1911's. I like hanging out with them, It's like the movie Grumpy Old Men . They're a blast.
    I have a little of most of the above except the 50 or 1911.
    Georgia

    MTK20

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #9 on: February 10, 2017, 08:15:09 PM »
    At the gun range there is typically the polymer kids of every size and shape. I see some AR's, bolt guns, etc.

    I never seem to see revolvers or 1911's though, which is sad. Remember that I only get out to the range every 6 months or so, though.



    As far as campus gun culture goes, I can speak for what I see at the college campus. In central Texas? Carrying a gun is forbidden. If you have a gun, don't talk about it, because you might have to verbally justify why you carry to any of the educated idiots that you meet. It is a sad state of affairs down there and I fear that Texas gun culture may be changing with every influx of Californian students we get.

    Now in northern Texas, where my university has an AR-15 raffle on the libraries bulletin board and a skeet shooting team, well...  :cool. I'm guessing that if heaven has a college campus, it is filled with pearl snap shirts, farmland, and down to earth professors who proudly proclaim that they carry a 17 shot 9mm to protect their students  :cool.
    Texas
    Do we forget that cops were primarily still using 6 Shot Revolvers well through the mid 80's? It wasn't until after 1986 that most departments then relented and went to autos.
    Capacity wasn't really an issue then... and honestly really it's not even an issue now.
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    Plebian

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #10 on: February 11, 2017, 08:02:23 PM »
    The gun culture in western OK where I grew up is mostly a bird hunting culture. I didn't know of a single individual in my hometown that didn't have a shotgun or 20. Even the hardcore anti-gunners in town had at least one shotgun. Since somehow shotguns didn't count as a gun. They were viewed as something like a golf club. All other hunting is second to turkey, quail and dove hunting. Lots of folks deer hunt, predator hunt and pop p dogs, BUT everyone bird hunted. There were many, many sections of public land to hunt, but most folks hunted private land. ARs, semi-autos and handguns were secondary to bolt rifles, pump shotguns and o/u-s/s shotguns of various types. 

    Middle and eastern OK is completely different. Deer hunting is the main game and bird hunting is secondary. Folks do more just 'casual' shooting at ranges with ARs, handguns etc etc. There are also more gun sport clubs for pistol and rifles as opposed to just skeet clubs in west OK. There is less available public land in the mid/east of OK as well.

    There is also a small sub set of hunters using dogs in OK as well. West OK tends to be running walkers and greyhounds for coyotes with less coon/bobcat/hog hunters. Where eastern OK is almost exclusively coon/hog hunters with various trailhounds. Bird dogs are just everywhere in OK. Since there is a large bird hunting culture. I would say 70%+ of the 'farm' dogs in west OK are bird dogs. The other 30% are cattle dogs or random muts/guard dogs.

    It is also much more accepted to bow hunt in mid/east OK. People in west OK tend to look at you odd if you bow hunt. It was common when I was in high school for folks to ask what tribe you were if they heard you used a bow to hunt. It was still seen as Natives hunted with a bow and 'whites'(lots of tribal folks still considered everyone not Native as white) hunted with guns. That stereotype has less hold now, but it is not uncommon for older folks to still hold it. Bows were also seen as being sneaky/used to poach.

    The carry culture is quite odd here. If you carry into town it is considered polite to cover it. It might just be a t-shirt pulled over a OWB carry of a huge revolver, but it somehow made it polite. If you were 'out of town' then carrying however was perfectly normal. I think this odd idea is from old town ordinances, and that 'open' carrying a pistol was a little drugstore cowboyish.       
    Oklahoma"If all our problems are solved, we'll find new ones to replace them. If we can't find new ones, we'll make new ones."

    GaBoy45

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #11 on: February 15, 2017, 03:02:35 PM »
    I live I central Georgia and work in Macon so the types of firearms run the gamut. I'll try to keep them somewhat organized.

    Hunting: Deer season, dove season, turkey season, and duck season are the big ones around here. The most commonly used calibers are .30-06 and .243 followed by .308 and .270 with .30-30 not far behind. There was a run on .300 Win Mag and 7mm Mag a while back but a lot of those got sold or traded when people realized they were a little overkill for the common sub-100 yd shot most would take. As far as shotguns go, a lot of people save up for Benellis but Beretta is making a huge wave and becoming the number one seller. There are a lot of hog hunters out there and their number one choice is an AR platform with a decent night vision scope.

    For carry or home defense Glock and the M&Ps are number one with 9mm/40 models being about equal. Most of the .40s are previous purchases with 9mm starting to catch up. Pocket .380s are the most carried pistol I'd say with Mossberg pump actions the most popular for HD. Pretty much everyone has an AR of some kind or another with Daniel Defense being one of the most popular by far.

    The culture is one of most people are familiar with firearms of one kind or another and either own at least one or having a relative who owns one.


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    katmandoo

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #12 on: February 16, 2017, 12:41:17 PM »
    Interesting topic, something I didn’t really think about until I started typing this.  Sorry if it is long winded and a bit disorganized. 

    I’m been living in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis/St. Paul) area of MN since ‘96.  The state is an overall mix of far left lunatics (predominately in the TC metro) and moderate Independents with a pockets of libertarians and conservatives.   The lunatics pretty much run the asylum and they’ve been able to push their idiotic progressive policies unhampered except when it comes to gun control.   At first glance, being a relatively rural state, you might think that was due to the large hunting community and for the most part you may be right but  we also have a growing sport shooting community here as well, even inside the liberal metro area.  Cowboy Action, USPSA, IDPA and 3Gun have become amazingly popular in the last few years (you can literally shoot a USPSA match almost every day) and I believe Trap is at (or near) the top of the list for high school sports.  My club added 2 trap ranges last year to support the demand from local high schools. 

    We have a lot of Rod & Gun and private hunting clubs but the new thing here are these high end indoor gun clubs with private membership options, I’ve seen at least 2 open in the last 6 months in the metro area and know of a couple more in the works.  Gorgeous places, private lounge and cigar bar, secure long term gun storage, designated shooting lanes completely separate from the common folk.  Checked one out today over lunch because we were looking at putting a class in there, nice place but the membership would have to come with free ammo or I wouldn’t be able to afford to shoot the rest of the year. 

    I teach carry classes a couple weekends a month.  We have 10 instructors, some only run 2 classes a month, I typically run 4.  Our total monthly average is hitting right around 350-400 students.  It flattened out a bit after the election but I’m still averaging 35-40 students on a weekend and I’d guestimate 25-30% of those students to be new shooters, never touched a gun before.  Probably half of the remaining students are long gun people, hunters, plinkers, etc. with the rest of the students having some handgun experience. 

    Outdoor ranges on the outskirts of the metro typically max out at 100 yards.  My club has a 200m range and I believe that is the longest in the immediate metro area.  You get outside the metro and there are some 300 yard ranges and there is a private 1000m about an hour north of me which has a 3-4yr waiting list.

    I hit the range about once a week and during the colder months when most people are shooting indoors,  handguns are more common, the bulk of which are defensive/carry type guns.   The outdoor ranges have a pretty equal mix of ARs and hunting rifles. 

    Overall it appears the firearm scene is doing quite well in MN. 
    MinnesotaKevin - Stillwater, MN

    "The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes....Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man."

    Thomas Jefferson's "Commonplace Book," 1774-1776, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in Chapter 40 of "On Crimes and Punishment", 1764

    RetroGrouch

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #13 on: February 16, 2017, 03:40:08 PM »
    Coelacanth covered the hunting part of Arizona gun culture, so I think I'll try to cover some other parts of it here in Arizona. 

    There are a number of people who carry for protection, and of course you don't see the open carrying down near the Valley of the Sun as often as further north, where culturally it isn't as big a deal.  I always get a laugh out of the breathless news reports of "a man with a gun".  So many people here own and carry a gun.  My wife and I joke that as soon as you come across the Arizona border we give you a gun if you don't have one.  Concealed carry is very popular, judging from the classes and sales of those types of guns and holsters.  Of course, since it is concealed, we don't know, do we?  Also Constitutional carry means you don't need a permit, so that encourages carrying. 

    We are fortunate to have Gunsite located here in Arizona, which although expensive, is very worthwhile.


    We have a lot of places to shoot, some informal out in the desert (or forests up north) and some nice formal ones both indoors and outdoors.  Shooting competitions of all types (not just Cowboy) are popular out here and we have some national champions who actually teach classes at them.

    Class III / NFA items are all legal and popular here, to the point we have retail businesses that specialize in them.

    Arizona may be the best place for a gun nut to live, both legally and culturally.
    Arizona

    Roper1911

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #14 on: February 16, 2017, 10:58:12 PM »
    Piedmont NC has a lot of hunting culture, people around here love, love, love hunting. if you don't have a bird gun, bolt action, and .22 for squirrels and rabbits you get looked at funny. again despite the maximum range for shots around here being about 75 yards, almost everyone uses a 4-12 power scope on a .308, .243, or .270 bolt action rifle. with .308 being the most popular.
    white tail, dove, duck and turkey are the games of choice. but almost every bird hunter I know carries some buckshot or 'rifled' slugs for dealing with the occasional coyote or feral hog (which can hit 4-500lbs in some areas). otherwise we have a reasonably active rifleman type group, especially the NSSC (north state shooting club). as well as a a few 'tactical' type of classes.
    concealed carry is so common you can't swing a dead cat without hitting someone with a pistol, mostly plasticfantastics like glocks, M&P's, ect. but you do see a few sigs and a suprising amount of 1911's and wheel guns.
    we don't have a huge NFA culture here. mostly because we have an Anti-NFA CLEO, decent fellow, but a Fudd through and through. though that's changing some with more SOT's popping recently.

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    booksmart

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #15 on: February 17, 2017, 09:58:35 AM »
    Georgia isss.... Georgia.

    The knife laws are pretty generous.  You can have just about anything, but carrying concealed has the same requirement as firearms.

    The concealed carry requirements are essentially pass a background check and have a picture ID and a pulse.

    For hunting, it's mostly deer & feral hogs, with a little coyote and birding thrown in - it really depends on where you are. If you're in the flatlands south of the fall line (where the foothills end and the peidmont begins, roughly from Macon to Augusta), it'll be mostly feral hogs, a little deer, and pheasant or dove, maybe some turkey.  North of the fall line, it'll be mostly deer & turkey.  Even in the piedmont, I'd be surprised if anyone was taking any real long shots.

    Weatherwise, our winters are vanishing. We've already got pollen counts this year (unheard of in February).  When we do have winter, it's either cold and crisp, or cold and drizzly. Every once in a while, cold and snowy, in which case buy milk, bread, and eggs, and stay away from the roads, 'cuz hardly anyone knows how to drive on it.  Summers are *hot* and humid, with feast or famine for rain.  Spring and fall are beautiful, and make up for the other two.

    GaBoy45

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #16 on: February 17, 2017, 03:15:01 PM »
    Georgia isss.... Georgia.

    The knife laws are pretty generous.  You can have just about anything, but carrying concealed has the same requirement as firearms.

    The concealed carry requirements are essentially pass a background check and have a picture ID and a pulse.

    For hunting, it's mostly deer & feral hogs, with a little coyote and birding thrown in - it really depends on where you are. If you're in the flatlands south of the fall line (where the foothills end and the peidmont begins, roughly from Macon to Augusta), it'll be mostly feral hogs, a little deer, and pheasant or dove, maybe some turkey.  North of the fall line, it'll be mostly deer & turkey.  Even in the piedmont, I'd be surprised if anyone was taking any real long shots.

    Weatherwise, our winters are vanishing. We've already got pollen counts this year (unheard of in February).  When we do have winter, it's either cold and crisp, or cold and drizzly. Every once in a while, cold and snowy, in which case buy milk, bread, and eggs, and stay away from the roads, 'cuz hardly anyone knows how to drive on it.  Summers are *hot* and humid, with feast or famine for rain.  Spring and fall are beautiful, and make up for the other two.

    It's the length of fall and spring I have a problem with...should be longer.


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    Mikee5star

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #17 on: February 18, 2017, 01:40:43 AM »
    Gun culture here in south central Alaska is weird.  Almost everyone has at least one, even the most anti-everything greeny.  But lots of people look at you strange if you carry in town, except in Anchorage, everyone from here thinks you need a gun if you go to Anchorage.  I carried my G36 the other day at work and it printed as I bent and twisted, and while no one actually said anything I got lots of strange looks.  But most of the guys at work have some sort of handgun semi-concealed in their vehicles.  I know a guy who used to drive around with a Beratta 92 clipped to the top of his steering column covered with a tshirt.  But he did not own a holster to carry on his person.  That said AK has constitutional carry and a license is not required.  Open carry is okay in most of the state.  Not a big deal with most people.  I had another friend who regularly hitch hiked successfully while carrying a Marlin 45-70. 

    There is almost no small game hunting so most hunting guns are big bolt actions usually scoped.  .308 is considered a delicate chick gun for a small woman who can't handle 30.06.  .338 mag is considered normal, usually with a 3-9 but 4-12's and bigger are getting more popular as antler restrictions on moose are more and more common.  There is deer hunting on Kodiak, small Sitka Black Tails about 90 miles by boat or air away, .338 is very common due to the population of BIG bears that live on the island.  7mm Rem Mag is also a very popular caliber and 30.06 is still the "traditional" Alaska cartridge.  I would guess that there are more big calibers, .375 and up, than smaller calibers in folks homes.

    Large caliber handguns are normal .44 mag and up are considered normal open carry for hiking and fishing activities.  10mm for bottom feeders has a huge following mainly among the younger population.  To the point that a local ammo store, now with three stores, started by bringing in Underwood and Buffalo Bore in 10mm and selling it out of his truck all over the road system. 

    For fun shooting, lots of the usual suspects AR's and AK's is all varieties and calibers.  Lots of Glocks, M&Ps, and everything else that is popular.  1911's are very popular as is almost anything in .45ACP. 

    Not much for organized competitive shooting out side of two ranges, that I know of, Snowshoe and Birchwood.  Birchwood has something almost every week.  Snowshoe is more like monthly.

    I have a hard time paying to go to a range as there are at least 6 backyard ranges that I know of in my neighborhood, including ours.  This does not count the people who just step out on the porch and casually shoot at anything.
    Alaska

    RetroGrouch

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #18 on: March 13, 2017, 06:54:31 PM »
    Did we have a winner for this contest?
    Arizona

    luke213(adamsholsters)

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #19 on: March 14, 2017, 03:41:55 PM »
    I believe Steve is going to be doing the announcement but I'll touch base with him as well.

    Take care

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    StevenTing

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #20 on: March 21, 2017, 02:37:35 PM »
    I haven't done the drawing yet but here are the numbers for the individuals.  I will get the actual drawing done tonight.

    1.   Kaso
    2.   coelacanth
    3.   Grant
    4.   Langenator
    5.   sqlbullet
    6.   First Shirt
    7.   Bignate88
    8.   lesptr
    9.   MTK20
    10.   Plebian
    11.   GaBoy45
    12.   Katmandoo
    13.   RetroGrouch
    14.   Roper1911
    15.   Booksmart
    16.   Mikee5star
    Utah

    Mikee5star

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #21 on: March 21, 2017, 03:47:24 PM »
    Dont count me. I won in Dec IIRC.
    Alaska

    StevenTing

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #22 on: March 23, 2017, 12:46:07 PM »
    I will be removing Mike from the line up so it's numbers 1-15. 

    Utah

    StevenTing

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    Re: Jan/Feb Holster contest
    « Reply #23 on: March 23, 2017, 12:50:07 PM »
    Winner is 8. lesptr
    Utah

    StevenTing

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    Utah

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